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		<title>The Ultimate Storage Unit Size Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Fri, 26 Feb 2021 16:51:15 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Self Storage]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[choosing a storage unit]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[renting a storage unit]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[self-storage units]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[storage unit]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[storage unit size]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7279</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Choosing the right storage unit size is critical. You want to choose a storage unit that will hold everything you need to store, but you do not want to end up paying for more storage space than you really need. This storage unit size guide will help you determine what size storage unit is most [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/">The Ultimate Storage Unit Size Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Choosing the right storage unit size is critical. You want to choose a storage unit that will hold everything you need to store, but you do not want to end up paying for more storage space than you really need. This storage unit size guide will help you determine what size storage unit is most optimal for storing your things.</p>
<h2>What Size Storage Unit Do You Need?</h2>
<p>Storage unit sizes often fall into several common measurements. But most people may not know how to correctly <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">calculate the square footage needed</a> based on the size or amount of items they&#8217;re storing. Using the storage unit sizing guide below, be sure to consider your future storage space size needs, as well as your current ones.</p>
<h3>Storage Unit Sizing Guide</h3>
<div class="storage-unit-size-table">
<table class="market-table" style="text-align: center; vertical-align: top; border: 1px solid #ddd; padding: 10px;">
<thead>
<tr>
<th class="market-table-header col-1">Unit Size (ft.)</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-2">Total Space (sq. ft.)</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-3">What Can Fit</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">5’ x 5’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">25</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Similar to a walk-in closet, this space fits a few pieces of furniture, six to eight boxes, or seasonal items.</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">5’ x 10’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">50</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Fits most items for a studio or small one-bedroom apartment.</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">10’ x 10’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">100</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Fits items for a one-bedroom apartment or large studio.</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">10’ x 15’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">150</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Stores items for a small two-bedroom apartment or most household furniture or appliances.</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">10’ x 20’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">200</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Perfect for items in a small two-bedroom house or storing a compact vehicle.</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">10’ x 30’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">300</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Ideal for items in a two- or three-bedroom home. It can store a small boat or a standard-sized vehicle.</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">15’ x 20’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">300</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Holds items in a three- or four-bedroom home. It can store boats and vehicles.</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">17’ x 20’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">340</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Fits most household possessions. You can store a compact car or several recreational vehicles (motorcycles, jet skis, ATVs).</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td style="width: 200px;">20’ x 20’</td>
<td style="width: 200px;">400</td>
<td style="text-align: left; width: 700px;">Perfect for items in a small two-bedroom house or storing a compact vehicle.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</div>
<p>&nbsp;<br />
<strong>Wondering how much renting a storage unit will cost? Use our <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">storage unit price guide</a> to see average monthly prices and compare with cheaper options from Neighbor.</strong></p>
<h3>What Size Storage Unit Do I Need for a Studio or Bedroom?</h3>
<p>A 5&#8242; x 15&#8242; sized storage unit or smaller will be perfect for storing the contents of a studio or single bedroom. Many college students find that they can get by with a 5&#8242; x 10&#8242; storage unit. In these units, you can store a single bed (especially if you prop the mattress up against a wall), a desk, and a chair with ease. If you need to store additional furniture, including appliances, you may want to go up to a 10&#8242; x 10&#8242; unit.</p>
<h3>What Size Storage Unit Do I Need for a 1-Bedroom Apartment?</h3>
<p>A 5&#8242; x 15&#8242; storage unit will typically hold the possessions needed to fill a one-bedroom apartment.  If you need to store a great deal of furniture or include appliances, you may want to go up to a 10&#8242; x 10&#8242; storage unit.</p>
<h3>What Size Storage Unit Do I Need for a 2-Bedroom Apartment?</h3>
<p>A 10&#8242; x 10&#8242; storage unit size is ideal for storage for the contents of a two-bedroom apartment. As you go up to a two-bedroom apartment, you may have more possessions to contend with, especially if you&#8217;re going in on storage with a roommate or you have a child whose possessions will also need to be stored. If you need to store a large quantity of items or want to include major appliances, you may want a 10&#8242; x 15&#8242; unit.</p>
<h3>What Size Storage Unit Do I Need for a 3-Bedroom House?</h3>
<p>For a three-bedroom house, you may want a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; storage unit or 10&#8242; x 30&#8242; storage unit, depending on the average size of your furniture and the number of appliances that you may need to store. If you need to store the contents of a house, you may want the larger storage unit size. It will allow you to store items like your lawnmower or outdoor tools along with the indoor contents of your home.</p>
<h3>What Size Storage Unit Do I Need for a 4-Bedroom House?</h3>
<p>A 10&#8242; x 30&#8242; storage unit is ideal for a 4-bedroom house, especially if you have a large amount of furniture in those rooms. Storage for a 4-bedroom house may involve taking more space into consideration.</p>
<h2>What Size Storage Unit Do I Need for a Car?</h2>
<p>If you need to store a vehicle, carefully consider the size of that vehicle before making plans for storage. Before storing a vehicle of any size, make sure you measure it to determine how much storage space you may need. Different vehicles may have unique size needs that do not fit in a standard storage unit.</p>
<h4>Motorcycle</h4>
<p>The average motorcycle is 6 feet long, so you will need a 5&#8242; x 10&#8242; storage unit, at minimum, to store a motorcycle.</p>
<h4>ATVs</h4>
<p>The average ATV measures just over 7 feet long. A 5&#8242; x 10&#8242; storage unit or any unit at least 10 feet in length will store an ATV comfortably. If you&#8217;re storing more than one ATV, consider a larger storage unit.</p>
<h4>Compact Cars</h4>
<p>A compact car measures, on average, 14-15 feet in length. You will need at least a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; storage unit to hold a compact car.</p>
<h4>Mid-Size Cars</h4>
<p>The average mid-size car comes in at around 14.7 feet. In order to store a mid-size car, you will need at least a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; storage unit.</p>
<h4>Full-Size Cars</h4>
<p>The average full-size car can measure up to 16 feet in length, so you will need a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; storage unit, at minimum.</p>
<h4>Full-Size SUVs</h4>
<p>The average SUV measures around 16 feet in length, but it can measure up to 18 feet in length. That means you will need a minimum of a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; storage unit.</p>
<p><strong>Not sure what kind of storage unit to get? Our <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">guide on storage unit types</a> will help you find the perfect unit for your needs.&#8221;</p>
<h2>What Size Storage Unit Do I Need for a Boat?</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7282" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Boat-owner-driving-his-boat-to-a-storage-unit.jpg" alt="Boat owner driving his boat to a storage unit" width="1800" height="1602" /></p>
<p>As you determine the <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/quick-guide-to-boat-storage/">storage unit size you need for a boat</a>, make sure you also consider the other items you might also want to store along with your boat: life jackets, paddles, skis, and other water fun equipment, for example.</p>
<h4>Jet Ski/Personal Watercraft</h4>
<p>A single Jet Ski or other personal watercraft measures just over 10 feet in length. You will need a storage unit that measures at least 5&#8242; x 15&#8242; to store your personal watercraft.</p>
<h4>Kayak or Canoe</h4>
<p>In general, a kayak tends to measure 12 feet in length. A canoe, on the other hand, usually measures around 17 feet. You will need at least a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; storage unit to store a kayak or canoe.</p>
<h4>Dinghy Boats</h4>
<p>Dinghies can measure between 6 and 20 feet. For a smaller dinghy, you can use a 5&#8242; x 10&#8242; storage unit. If you have a larger dinghy, you&#8217;ll need a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; or 10&#8242; x 30&#8242; storage unit.</p>
<h4>Skiff Boats</h4>
<p>Skiffs come in a variety of sizes, but they generally measure approximately 15 feet in length. You will need a storage unit that measures at least 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; to hold your skiff comfortably.</p>
<h4>Fishing Boats</h4>
<p>A personal fishing boat generally measures between 20 and 30 feet in length. Check the length of yours to determine what size storage unit or parking space you will need. On average, that means a minimum of a 10&#8242; x 20&#8242; or a 10&#8242; x 30&#8242; storage unit.</p>
<h4>Deck Boats and Bowrider Boats</h4>
<p>The average deck boat measures up to 23 feet, though they may measure up to 26 feet in length. You may need to look for a 10&#8242; x 30&#8242; storage unit size at a minimum.</p>
<h4>Houseboats</h4>
<p>Houseboats measure between 60 and 70 feet in length. They may require extensive storage space that measures as much as 50&#8242; x 70&#8242;.</p>
<h2>Finding the Right Sized Storage Space With Neighbor</h2>
<p>Renting a perfectly sized storage space is critical for adequately storing all your possessions without paying for more space than you need. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">Neighbor </a>can provide storage solutions of all shapes and sizes at a fraction of the cost you&#8217;d pay at a local self-storage facility. Our storage is located nearby, and it&#8217;s cheaper, safer, and more reliable than traditional storage facilities. No matter what storage unit size you choose to rent on Neighbor, all your stored items are protected by a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/renter-guarantee">$25,000 Renter Guarantee</a> at no extra cost. Whether you need to store a large boat, small vehicle, all your household furniture, or just a few personal items, use Neighbor to find the perfect sized storage unit located near you.</p>
<h4>Storage Guides</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/">Storage Unit Size Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">Average Monthly Storage Unit Costs</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">Types of Storage Units</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">Storage Unit Insurance Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">How to Calculate Square Footage</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
      </a>
   </div>
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/">The Ultimate Storage Unit Size Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
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		</item>
		<item>
		<title>Average Monthly Storage Unit Price Guide (And a Cheaper Alternative)</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Fri, 26 Feb 2021 16:22:12 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Self Storage]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[renting a storage unit]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[storage unit]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[storage unit price]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7273</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>There are a variety of reasons individuals decide to rent a storage unit, but one of the most prominent rental factors is cost. Whether you&#8217;re in the process of moving or downsizing, or you simply have more possessions than you have space for, the first step to determining the storage unit you need is to [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">Average Monthly Storage Unit Price Guide (And a Cheaper Alternative)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>There are a variety of reasons individuals decide to rent a storage unit, but one of the most prominent rental factors is cost. Whether you&#8217;re in the process of moving or downsizing, or you simply have more possessions than you have space for, the first step to determining the storage unit you need is to assess storage rental prices. Costs for renting a storage unit will vary widely based on a variety of factors and features. This guide will provide an overview of the average storage unit price offered by traditional storage facilities and the factors that affect these storage rates.</p>
<h2>How Much Does It Cost to Rent a Storage Unit?</h2>
<p>Storage units are often rented on a monthly basis, and storage rates vary depending on the size and features of the unit. While storage units are typically considered secure, the types available vary widely. For instance, some storage units are indoor units, and others can be accessed from outside. Still, the biggest price factor in similarly sized storage units is climate control. While there are some differences due to location and other factors, you can generally expect your storage unit rental price to fall within these averages:</p>
<ul>
<li>The average storage rental price for a standard storage unit typically ranges from $60-$180 per month.</li>
<li>The average storage rental price for a climate-controlled storage unit typically ranges from $75-$225 per month.</li>
</ul>
<h2>Average Storage Unit Price by Size</h2>
<p>It&#8217;s clear that storage rates vary quite widely, even within the same type of unit. The reason for this is typically size. Storage unit sizes vary by square footage, and prices rise as units get larger. So to get a more accurate comparison, it&#8217;s essential to compare prices among different sizes of units.</p>
<h3>Storage Unit Price Comparison</h3>
<div class="storage-unit-size-table">
<table class="market-table" style="text-align: center; vertical-align: top; width: 550px; border: 1px solid #ddd; padding: 10px;">
<thead>
<tr>
<th class="market-table-header col-1"></th>
<th class="market-table-header col-2">5’ x 5’</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-3">5’ x 10’</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-4">10’ x 10’</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-5">10’ x 15’</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-6">10’ x 20’</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><strong>Average Monthly Price</strong></td>
<td>$60</td>
<td>$70</td>
<td>$110</td>
<td>$130</td>
<td>$180</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>Climate-Controlled Average Monthly Price</strong></td>
<td>$75</td>
<td>$88</td>
<td>$138</td>
<td>$163</td>
<td>$225</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>What Fits</strong></td>
<td style="text-align: left; vertical-align: text-top;">Several boxes or furniture items, seasonal items, or college summer storage.</td>
<td style="text-align: left; vertical-align: text-top;">Studio or small 1-bedroom apartment items.</td>
<td style="text-align: left; vertical-align: text-top;">Small 2-bedroom or larger 1-bedroom apartment items.</td>
<td style="text-align: left; vertical-align: text-top;">Larger or 1-2 bedroom house items, a compact car, or small recreational toys.</td>
<td style="text-align: left; vertical-align: text-top;">3-4 bedroom home items or a standard-sized vehicle.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</div>
<h2>Cost Factors for Storage Units</h2>
<p>To determine the storage unit rate you&#8217;ll actually pay, you&#8217;ll need to take several factors into consideration. Depending on these factors, you may be paying slightly more or a little less than the average storage unit cost.</p>
<h3>Location</h3>
<p>The location of the storage facility could actually drive up your storage unit price. Facilities in urban areas are often more expensive due to high demand. However, you may be able to save money if you&#8217;re willing to drive further to use a storage unit in a less populated area.</p>
<h3>Size of Unit</h3>
<p>While you want to choose a storage unit slightly larger than you think you&#8217;ll need, the storage unit cost will increase considerably with larger-sized units. Take the time to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">calculate the square footage</a> you actually need and purge items you intend to replace.</p>
<h3>Seasonality and Availability</h3>
<p>Self-storage prices are often lower in the winter. 80% of moves in America occur between the months of April and September, driving up demand (and the average storage unit price). However, if you live in an area that isn&#8217;t densely populated with a wealth of available storage units, then you might get a lower rate than average.</p>
<h3>Climate Control</h3>
<p>Some items that could sustain damage in traditional storage conditions can benefit from a climate-controlled storage unit. These units eliminate the dangers of damage due to extreme temperature changes. These units may also include humidity control. However, temperature-controlled storage unit prices are always higher than non-temperature controlled units.</p>
<h3>Facility Type</h3>
<p>The type of storage facility can greatly affect average storage unit prices. For instance, indoor storage may be more expensive than outdoor storage. If you need climate control, then your monthly storage rates will go up. Also, you might pay an additional price for humidity control. Vehicle storage also varies depending on the type of storage and features available (indoor, outdoor, or covered storage).</p>
<p><strong>Not sure what kind of storage unit to get? Use our <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">guide on storage types</a> to help you choose the perfect solution for your needs.</strong></p>
<h3>Duration of Occupancy</h3>
<p>Long-term vs. short-term rental contracts can have an effect on your storage unit price. While many storage facilities typically rent out storage units on a month-to-month basis, some have a minimum rental duration requirement (usually three months). Since rental payments are typically taken care of when you sign on the dotted line, it&#8217;s essential to know the total cost to rent a storage unit upfront with any minimum rental durations factored in.</p>
<h3>Level of Service</h3>
<p>Storage unit pricing can vary between a full-service facility and a self-service storage facility. Full-service storage facilities include pickup, delivery, and often photo documentation of your possessions, but these perks come at a cost. You can expect full-service storage units to have a higher monthly rate than self-storage units.</p>
<h3>Security Deposit and Administration Fees</h3>
<p>Each facility has different practices regarding security deposit amounts and the fees associated with renting a storage unit. These are typically upfront costs, but administration fees can be a monthly charge.</p>
<h3>Insurance</h3>
<p>Most storage facilities require you to protect your possessions with some type of insurance coverage. If you don&#8217;t have renters or homeowners insurance, then you may have the option to purchase insurance through your storage facility. But not all facilities offer it. If you do opt for storage insurance provided by the storage facility, then the cost of insurance premiums will be added to your monthly storage unit price.</p>
<p><strong>Protect your stored belongings using our <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">storage insurance guide</a> for navigating the type of coverage you need.</strong></p>
<h3>Specials or Add-Ons</h3>
<p>You can often get a discounted price if your storage facility offers discounts like getting the first month free. However, when you take advantage of add-ons offered by the facility (like storage bins, packing supplies, padlocks, and labor assistance), you&#8217;ll likely spend more on your final storage unit cost than you bargained for.</p>
<h2>Cheaper Monthly Storage Rates With Neighbor</h2>
<p>We know that cost is a leading factor when shopping for a storage unit. So with average monthly prices and factors for renting a unit from a traditional storage facility now considered, it&#8217;s clear that Neighbor is the better solution for finding cheaper storage units that meet your needs. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">Neighbor </a>is a storage company that connects residents who have extra space with renters who need to use that space. It&#8217;s like Airbnb for storing your belongings.</p>
<p>Renters that move away from traditional storage facilities and leverage peer-to-peer storage solutions like Neighbor can find the type of storage unit they need and often pay 50% less than units in storage facilities. Consider these average prices for renting a storage unit with Neighbor compared to the cost of renting a storage unit through traditional storage facilities.</p>
<h3>Average Storage Unit Prices: Neighbor vs. Traditional Storage</h3>
<div class="average-price-table">
<table class="market-table" style="text-align: center; vertical-align: top; width: 550px; border: 1px solid #ddd; padding: 10px;">
<thead>
<tr>
<th class="market-table-header col-1">Unit Size</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-2">Average Monthly Price<br /> on Neighbor</th>
<th class="market-table-header col-3">Average Monthly Price at<br /> Storage Facilities</th>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><strong>5’ x 5’</strong></td>
<td>$20</td>
<td>$60</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>5’ x 10’</strong></td>
<td>$26</td>
<td>$70</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>5’ x 15’</strong></td>
<td>$50</td>
<td>$90-$100</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>10’ x 10’</strong></td>
<td>$42</td>
<td>$110</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>10’ x 15’</strong></td>
<td>$44</td>
<td>$130</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>10’ x 20’</strong></td>
<td>$72</td>
<td>$180</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>15’ x 15’</strong></td>
<td>$100</td>
<td>$183</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><strong>20’ x 20’</strong></td>
<td>$105</td>
<td>$150</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
</div>
<p>Obviously, when it comes to storing your possessions, the storage unit price isn&#8217;t the only thing you&#8217;re worried about. Neighbor offers a variety of other quality features for renters, as well. Neighbor protects stored items with a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/renter-guarantee">$25,000 Renter Guarantee</a>, but storage facilities may charge as much as $25 for less coverage. For many renters, it&#8217;s easy to find a variety of storage unit types, from indoor rooms to garage spaces conveniently located in secure residential areas. Finding secure space to store your belongings doesn&#8217;t have to cost a fortune. For many, it simply means finding a new solution.</p>
<h4>Storage Guides</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/">Storage Unit Size Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">Average Monthly Storage Unit Costs</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">Types of Storage Units</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">Storage Unit Insurance Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">How to Calculate Square Footage</a></li>
</ul>
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">Average Monthly Storage Unit Price Guide (And a Cheaper Alternative)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Create a Car Emergency Kit</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/car-emergency-kit/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/car-emergency-kit/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 25 Feb 2021 19:00:40 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Lifestyle]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[car tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Life Hacks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winter guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winter tips]]></category>

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		<description><![CDATA[<p>During winter and early spring, it’s important to have the right items on hand in your car emergency kit. You can pick up a basic roadside emergency kit and first aid kit on Amazon or at your favorite local retailer to help you save a little money. But those items may not contain everything you [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/car-emergency-kit/">How to Create a Car Emergency Kit</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>During winter and early spring, it’s important to have the right items on hand in your car emergency kit. You can pick up a basic roadside emergency kit and first aid kit on Amazon or at your favorite local retailer to help you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/save-money-fast/">save a little money</a>. But those items may not contain everything you need for the emergencies that could crop up on your local roads. Are you ready to make sure you have the right emergency supplies on hand in your car? From flat tires to dead batteries, make sure you&#8217;re prepared for every emergency situation with this clear guide to packing together a car emergency kit.</p>
<h2>Step One: Evaluate Your Local Climate</h2>
<p>As you&#8217;re preparing your car survival kit, consider your local climate. Suppose you live in an area that sees heavy snow, ice, and temperatures below freezing throughout the winter months. In that case, your auto emergency kit may need to contain more items to get you through an emergency situation than if you live in a temperate climate. Likewise, if you live in an area where weather emergencies, including hurricanes, are common, you may want to make sure that you have a bug-out bag as part of your car emergency kit. Even<a href="https://www.neighbor.com/car-storage"> if you store your car</a>, keeping a kit of basic emergency items ready will help once you’re ready to drive it again.</p>
<h2>Step Two: Choose a Container for Your Car Emergency Kit (or Kits)</h2>
<p>To create the ultimate survival kit for your car, you need the perfect container (or containers). You don&#8217;t want your emergency kit items rolling around in the car or getting lost under the seat when you need them most. A small first aid kit can tuck under the front seat of your vehicle, while a larger emergency kit can be left in the trunk for easy access. You want a container that:</p>
<ul>
<li>Fits well in your vehicle. Consider where you want to store your car emergency kit and select a container that fits in that location.</li>
<li>Holds the supplies you will need. Keep in mind that not all of your emergency supplies will go in your kit, but most of them will.</li>
<li>Is brightly colored so that you can find it easily.</li>
<li>Has compartments or dividers to make it easier to sort out the items you will need.</li>
</ul>
<p>You may want a box for a first aid kit, your general emergency supplies kit, and a specific kit for winter driving emergencies. Even the biggest <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/the-millennial-minimalist/">minimalist </a>will find immense benefits to ensuring that these supplies are on hand. Also, keeping them neatly stored can help improve your car&#8217;s overall organization.</p>
<h2>Step Three: Start Collecting Supplies for Your Car Emergency Kit</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7153" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Car-owner-checking-the-air-pressure-in-their-tire-while-holding-a-flashlight.jpg" alt="Car owner checking the air pressure in their tire while holding a flashlight" width="1254" height="837" /></p>
<p>Carefully consider the supplies you need for your vehicle. Some things, every vehicle will need all year long; others, you may want to consider adding when the weather is cold. If you&#8217;re planning a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/14-best-places-travel-alone/">big trip</a>, make sure your emergency kit is fully stocked before you hit the road.</p>
<h3>Emergency Supplies for Every Vehicle</h3>
<p>Whether you&#8217;re packing a first roadside emergency kit for a teen who has recently gotten his license or you&#8217;re planning for emergency supplies for a road trip, every vehicle should have these items:</p>
<h4>Jumper Cables</h4>
<p>A dead battery should not leave you stranded with no hope of help. Make sure you have your own jumper cables (and that you know how to use them). If you have an older vehicle or know that you have alternator problems, consider investing in a portable battery charger. You can keep it in your vehicle and use it to jump your vehicle anywhere. You don&#8217;t want to have to hope that someone with booster cables will take pity on you when you have a dead battery!</p>
<h4>A Flashlight</h4>
<p>An emergency in the dark can leave you unable to see what&#8217;s going on around you. An independent flashlight — that is, one not attached to your phone — can make it easier for you to see everything that&#8217;s going on around you. Choose a flashlight that has more than one brightness setting. You may also want to consider a light that has a flashing light option. This can help attract attention or serve to help blind and disorient an attacker in an emergency.</p>
<h4>A Charger for Your Cell Phone</h4>
<p>Your cell phone is one of the most valuable tools you can have on hand in the event of an emergency. From calling AAA to let you into a locked vehicle or handle a flat tire to calling 911 after a serious accident, your cell phone can help get you out of a lot of emergencies. But that&#8217;s not true if it&#8217;s dead. Make sure you have a charging cable and USB charger. You may also want to consider storing an emergency cell phone charger in your emergency kit.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Creating a Car Emergency Kit</h4>
<p>Portable battery chargers will lose their charge with time, especially in cold weather. Consider a solar-powered or crank emergency cell phone charger. It will allow you to charge up your cell phone battery in an emergency.</p></blockquote>
<h4>Duct Tape</h4>
<p>Duct tape can solve a variety of problems, from acting as a tourniquet if you suffer a serious injury to allowing you to make emergency car repairs at the side of the road. Include duct tape as part of your emergency kit.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Creating a Car Emergency Kit:</h4>
<p>Check your duct tape at the end of the summer to make sure that it doesn&#8217;t need replacing. The adhesive can melt and become nearly unusable after the summer months.</p></blockquote>
<h4>A Car Fire Extinguisher</h4>
<p>Even if you drive a newer vehicle, make sure you have a car fire extinguisher on hand. It won&#8217;t help you in the event of a major accident and a big fire. But it could prove invaluable if you suffer a small engine fire. Consider keeping your fire extinguisher under the driver&#8217;s seat or in a seat pocket to make it easily accessible in an emergency.</p>
<h4>A Basic Toolkit</h4>
<p>Make sure you have a basic toolkit in your vehicle that includes a screwdriver, basic automotive tools, a hammer, pliers, a socket set, a wrench, and heavy-duty gloves. While you might not have the skills needed to fix everything that can go wrong with your vehicle on the road, having basic tools on hand could save you a call to roadside assistance. A basic multi-tool can also prove useful.</p>
<h4>Reflective Triangles</h4>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7154" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Reflective-triangle-in-front-of-a-parked-car-with-an-engine-problem.jpg" alt="Reflective triangle in front of a parked car with an engine problem" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>If you have to pull off the road to fix a flat tire or wait for help to arrive, you should turn off your headlights and tail lights to avoid confusing other drivers on the road. You still, however, want your vehicle to be very noticeable. Reflective triangles can make it easier to catch other drivers&#8217; attention and keep you safer. These warning triangles can also notify the police that there is someone at the scene of a vehicle.</p>
<h4>A Seatbelt Cutter and Window Breaker</h4>
<p>If you get stuck in your car after an accident, you want the means to get out — fast! A seatbelt cutter can cut your seatbelt directly, making it easier for you to escape from the vehicle in a fire or if your vehicle falls into the water. Keep a seatbelt cutter down in the driver&#8217;s side door of your vehicle, where you will be able to reach it easily in an emergency.</p>
<p>Likewise, a window breaker is one tool you hope that you never have to use but which you&#8217;ll be very glad you have on hand if an emergency occurs. Keep a window breaker close at hand in your vehicle. You may be able to find a multipurpose tool that will handle both seatbelt cutting and window breaking tasks in an emergency.</p>
<h4>A Spare Tire</h4>
<p>If you have a flat tire, you need a spare tire in your safety kit to allow you to safely repair your vehicle and get it out of the way. Make sure you <a href="https://roadwayready.com/what-should-the-air-pressure-of-my-spare-tire-be/#:~:text=How%20often%20should%20you%20check,not%20be%20there%20for%20you." target="_blank">check your spare tire</a> just as regularly as you do the other tires on your car. Check its tire pressure every other time you rotate your tires and when the weather changes. While roadside assistance and AAA might have the means to re-inflate your tire if needed, they can&#8217;t magically repair a tire that is falling apart.</p>
<h4>A Tire Pressure Gauge</h4>
<p>You walked out to the car late at night, only to find that one wheel is sitting lower than you thought. You put the spare tire on after fixing a flat but discovered that it doesn&#8217;t look quite right. Keeping a tire pressure gauge in with your emergency tools can make it easier to check the tire&#8217;s pressure and determine whether it&#8217;s strong enough to handle the demands you need to make of it.</p>
<h4>An Air Compressor</h4>
<p>If you have room in your vehicle or know you&#8217;re driving around with a tire that could go flat at any moment, an air compressor can help you re-inflate your tires and get on your way.</p>
<h4>A Tow Strap</h4>
<p>If you get stuck, what comes next? A tow strap can help you attach your vehicle to a friend&#8217;s truck, which will allow you to tow your vehicle yourself, rather than waiting for roadside assistance to arrive. Make sure you choose a tow rope rated for your vehicle and that you know how to use effectively.</p>
<h4>A Safety Vest</h4>
<p>If you have to get out of your car to deal with an emergency, you want to make sure that you&#8217;re highly visible. <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/transportationsafety/pedestrian_safety/index.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fmotorvehiclesafety%2Fpedestrian_safety%2Findex.html" target="_blank">Pedestrian safety</a> often isn&#8217;t a top consideration on busy roadways. A reflective safety vest won&#8217;t offer protection from the other vehicles zooming by all around you. But it will make it easier for other drivers to see you and increase the odds that they&#8217;ll be able to avoid you.</p>
<h4>A Rain Poncho</h4>
<p>Make sure you have a rain poncho or raincoat in your vehicle. It does not necessarily have to go directly in your roadside emergency car kit. Still, you should make sure that you store it in an easily accessible location within your vehicle. A rain poncho can help keep the rain off in bad weather or act as a shield if you need to work on your vehicle despite the weather around you.</p>
<h4>Spare Windshield Wipers</h4>
<p>Keep an extra windshield wiper or two in your car emergency kit for bad weather. You never know when bad weather, leaves, or dirt will cause damage to your windshield wiper. If you&#8217;re out driving in the rain, you may discover that you can no longer see clearly enough to drive. A spare windshield wiper in your car emergency kit, on the other hand, can help you get back on the road again quickly.</p>
<h4>Cat Litter</h4>
<p>Not only can cat litter help provide much-needed traction on ice, but it also helps absorb oil from spills. If you have an older vehicle, in particular, you may want to tuck a small container of cat litter into your emergency kit.</p>
<h4>Windshield Washer Fluid</h4>
<p>Washer fluid helps clear away dirt and grit from your windshield. Without it, you cannot clean your windshield from inside the car, which can pose a serious problem — especially if you get stuck behind a vehicle that&#8217;s throwing mud or dirt your way. Keep washer fluid in your emergency kit, and make sure that you check your fluids with every oil change.</p>
<h4>An Emergency Blanket</h4>
<p>An emergency blanket isn&#8217;t just valuable in the cold winter months. A reflective emergency blanket can also serve a variety of other purposes in a roadside emergency. You can use it to signal for help, to warm a passenger in the vehicle, or to provide a layer of protection from the ground as you&#8217;re working. Keeping your clothing off the ground could prove particularly valuable if you suffer a roadside emergency when you&#8217;re on your way to an event, from work meetings to special dates.</p>
<h4>Extra Batteries</h4>
<p>Store a handful of extra batteries for your devices, including your flashlight, in your car emergency kit. Replace those batteries annually since they may not last as long in your vehicle as they would in the house.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Creating a Car Emergency Kit</h4>
<p>Make sure batteries are stored in their own container, away from any metal objects in your emergency kit!</p></blockquote>
<h4>A Fire Starter</h4>
<p>A fire starter can help you set off flares or make it easier for you to start a fire if you end up stranded during the winter. Keep it in a waterproof pouch away from other items in your emergency kit.</p>
<h4>Road Flares</h4>
<p>Road flares light up the night, notify authorities about your accident or emergency, and help draw attention to the scene. Keep a kit specifically designed for roadside use in your car emergency kit.</p>
<h4>Water</h4>
<p>Keep a few spare water bottles tucked in the back of your vehicle in case of an emergency. Not only can it serve as an emergency coolant if you suffer a coolant leak (though you should refill your tank with antifreeze as soon as possible no matter the time of year), it can make it easier for you to wait for roadside assistance or emergency personnel to arrive.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Creating a Car Emergency Kit</h4>
<p>Never pour cold or air-temperature water into a hot vehicle. If you do need to add antifreeze or water, wait for the car to cool down first.</p></blockquote>
<h3>What to Keep in Your Auto First Aid Kit</h3>
<p>A basic first aid kit is critical to any vehicle — especially if you have kids or engage in any type of athletic activity. Your first aid kit can be the ultimate step in emergency preparedness. Of course, any first aid kit contains the basics: band-aids, gauze, towelettes, gloves, and antiseptic. In your ultimate roadside emergency car kit, however, you may want to include a few other items.</p>
<h4>Ace Bandages</h4>
<p>You never know when you will need an Ace bandage, or elastic bandage. Whether you sprain an ankle while out hiking or need to create a compression bandage after an auto accident, an elastic bandage can serve your purpose.</p>
<h4>Extra Medications</h4>
<p>If you need to take medications (especially emergency medications) regularly, you may want to make sure that you have some in your auto emergency kit. You may also want to consider items like Benadryl or a spare epi-pen if you have allergies.</p>
<h4>Saline</h4>
<p>Saline can help irrigate a wound or refresh dry contacts. It&#8217;s an extremely valuable item to have on hand.</p>
<h4>Petroleum Jelly</h4>
<p>This versatile item can prove extremely valuable in a variety of situations, from preventing medical tape or gauze from sticking to a wound to soothing chapped lips in winter.</p>
<h4>An Emergency Tourniquet</h4>
<p>Having an emergency tourniquet on hand can help stop extreme bleeding. Make sure you&#8217;re proficient in its use and know when and how to employ a tourniquet.</p>
<h4>A Spare Medical Mask</h4>
<p>If you need to offer treatment to someone else, a medical mask can help prevent you from sharing germs with them. It&#8217;s not just a COVID-19 essential!</p>
<h4>A CPR Mask</h4>
<p>These masks can make it easier to <a href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/first-aid/cpr/" target="_blank">administer CPR</a> without sharing germs.</p>
<h3>What to Add to Your Vehicle Emergency Kit in Winter</h3>
<p><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">When winter arrives</a>, check over the emergency supplies in your vehicle and make sure you have the right tools on hand for changing weather. Some drivers choose to keep winter emergency supplies in their cars all year long. Even if you feel that you&#8217;re always prepared, make sure you go over your supplies and check them before the first freeze arrives.</p>
<h4>A Spare Coat</h4>
<p>Sometimes, you may hop in your vehicle for what you assume will be a short trip without grabbing your coat. You may not even intend to go inside when you reach your destination: you might plan to go through a drive-through to pick up dinner, for example, or simply plan to drop the kids off at school before you head for home again. Unfortunately, emergencies rarely choose a convenient time to arrive. Keep a spare coat on hand so that you can stay warm while you deal with a problem with your vehicle, address an accident, or wait for help to arrive.</p>
<h4>An Extra Warm Blanket</h4>
<p>While an emergency blanket can help keep you warm by reflecting heat, it doesn&#8217;t feel particularly warm and cozy. Also, if you have only a single emergency blanket stored in your car, you and your passengers may have to huddle up close to get everyone underneath. Keeping an extra warm blanket in the trunk or tucked into your emergency kit can make it easier for everyone to stay warm.</p>
<h4>An Ice Scraper</h4>
<p>During winter, your windshield can ice over before you know it. You may know that you need an ice scraper or some type of spray available first thing in the morning before the sun has a chance to burn off the frost on your vehicle. But as winter arrives, you should also consider scraping ice off of your windshield if you leave work late or even spend more time than anticipated shopping after dark. Make sure there&#8217;s an ice scraper in your vehicle so that if you do end up with a frosty windshield, you can easily scrape it away.</p>
<h4>Food</h4>
<p>You don&#8217;t necessarily need enough food stored in your car to put together a gourmet meal. But you certainly want to make sure that you have enough food on hand to cover you for a few hours, especially if you end up stranded. Granola bars, crackers, protein bars, or trail mix are all great choices. If you&#8217;re planning to leave your emergency kit in the car year-round, you may want to make sure that your trail mix doesn&#8217;t have chocolate, as it can melt and turn everything in the bag to mush.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Creating a Car Emergency Kit</h4>
<p>Store food in a plastic container. This will help keep out bugs and pests, especially as the weather warms up again. It will also help prevent those pests from being attracted to the other items in your emergency kit.</p></blockquote>
<p>Emergency preparedness is vital, especially <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/12-best-scenic-drives-around-los-angeles/">out on the road</a>. By taking the time to prepare your vehicle emergency kit ahead of time, you&#8217;ll find that you&#8217;re much better prepared for anything that might happen. From accidents to flat tires, make sure you&#8217;re fully prepared for whatever may come your way by packing your emergency kit with these key items.</p>
<h2>Additional Winterization Resources</h2>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/car-emergency-kit/">How to Create a Car Emergency Kit</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Do You Need Storage Unit Insurance and How to Choose the Right Coverage</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Wed, 24 Feb 2021 23:28:08 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Self Storage]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[self-storage units]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[storage units]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7253</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>When it comes to storage unit insurance, there are many areas to navigate. What does storage insurance cover? Do I need insurance for my storage unit? Is it included with my storage unit or do I need to shop for it on my own? This guide will help answer all those questions and walk you [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">Do You Need Storage Unit Insurance and How to Choose the Right Coverage</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>When it comes to storage unit insurance, there are many areas to navigate. What does storage insurance cover? Do I need insurance for my storage unit? Is it included with my storage unit or do I need to shop for it on my own? This guide will help answer all those questions and walk you through everything you need to know about storage insurance, including Neighbor’s Renter Guarantee which provides protection at no additional cost.</p>
<h3>Jump to a section&#8230;</h3>
<p><a href="#overview">How Does Storage Insurance Work?<br />
</a><a href="#cost">How Much Does Storage Unit Insurance Cost?<br />
</a><a href="#types">What Other Types of Insurance Cover a Storage Unit?<br />
</a><a href="#coverage">What is covered under storage insurance?<br />
</a><a href="#facility">Should you use storage unit insurance provided by a storage facility?<br />
</a><a href="#neighbor">Neighbor&#8217;s Free Renter Guarantee<br />
</a></p>
<div id="overview"></div>
<h2>How does storage insurance work?</h2>
<p>When it comes to protecting items stored away in a unit, a storage insurance policy is what will grant coverage if something happens to your property no matter where you might be. Some storage facilities may require it in order to reserve a unit and they may or may not offer storage insurance you can opt into if you don’t already have coverage, but not all facilities guarantee this offer.</p>
<p>If you own your home, your homeowners insurance might provide coverage or even your renter’s policy if you’re a renter. In most cases, your existing coverage may extend to the contents you keep within a storage unit.</p>
<div id="types"></div>
<h2>How much does storage unit insurance cost?</h2>
<p>If you don’t use any existing homeowners or renters policy to cover your storage unit, storage facilities may offer a storage insurance policy deductible ranging between $100 to $500 to cover between $2,500 to $5,000 worth of property.</p>
<p>As it applies when determining insurance pricing, the cost to acquire storage insurance will be dependent on how large your storage unit is and how valuable the property you’re storing is worth.</p>
<p><strong>Use this helpful <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">guide for choosing a storage unit type</a> that fits your needs before determining the level of insurance coverage you&#8217;ll need.</strong></p>
<div id="types"></div>
<h2>What other types of insurance cover a storage unit?</h2>
<p>In many instances, your existing insurance policies can likely extend coverage to protect your items in a storage unit. However, it’s important to check your existing insurance policy carefully to confirm if it will provide the level of storage unit insurance needed. If it doesn’t cover personal items kept in a storage unit or doesn’t provide enough coverage, you may want to consider changing your existing policy or seek out a separate storage insurance policy.</p>
<p><strong>Homeowners insurance policy coverage: </strong>Most homeowners insurance likely acts as “storage unit insurance” depending on what items are being stored. Be sure to check your “off-premises coverage” section on your existing homeowners insurance policy to confirm if your personal property and valuables intended for storage will have the protection you need. In terms of protection, it’s likely that any items stolen or damaged in your storage unit won’t have the same amount of coverage as they would if stored they were stored in your home. In many cases, more valuable items such as firearms, jewelry, antiques, art, collectibles, and other highly expensive items may have limited coverage or not be included in under your existing policy at all.</p>
<p><strong>Renters insurance coverage:</strong> Most renters insurance policies provide coverage that protects items in a storage unit. However, with renters insurance, the coverage limit may be significantly lower than what you actually need and you’ll want to either update your existing renters policy to increase coverage or opt into coverage provided by a facility if it’s available. Similar to the limitations often found with homeowners insurance coverage, your existing renters insurance policy may not include more valuable or rare items stored.</p>
<p><strong>Auto insurance policy coverage:</strong> Existing car insurance policies are your best bet for car storage insurance needs and there are many different types of coverage to choose from when opting for an auto insurance policy, depending on how you intend on using your vehicle. Driving-related type coverage aside, you may only need comprehensive coverage if you’re storing a car for more than 30-days to protect against any damaging events outside of your control such as weather disasters, vandalism, fire, theft, etc. If you reduce your current auto insurance policy down to comprehensive-only coverage, you may also benefit in getting a lowered premium cost as well. The financial status of the car will likely dictate if comprehensive-only coverage will be enough to protect your vehicle in storage without needing collision coverage as well.</p>
<p><strong>Boat insurance policy coverage:</strong> When storing your boat during the off-season, you’ll still want to make sure it’s protected against theft, disasters, or unforeseen damages. Ending your existing boat insurance policy while storing your watercraft is not recommended and existing homeowners insurance might extend coverage to your boat, but it’s likely not enough and may not apply at all if stored off-premises. Depending on the financial status of your boat, updating your current policy to opt into winter-only coverage may be available to protect your boat while stored during the off-season and save on costs to maintain coverage. However, year-round coverage may be the only option to ensure your boat stays protected if it’s financed.</p>
<div id="coverage"></div>
<h2>What is covered under storage insurance?</h2>
<p>Take a look at your existing policy to assess what types of damage are typically covered. For example, some insurance policies may not cover flood or water damage. Others may not cover specific types of natural disasters. Make sure you know what coverage your policy offers and how it applies to your storage unit.</p>
<p><strong>Coverage for water or smoke damage:</strong> Damages caused by water or smoke are most commonly excluded from storage unit insurance coverage, depending on the policy you have. For example, renters insurance often covers fire damage, but not water damage. If you choose storage insurance provided by the facility or a third-party provider, be sure to verify the extent of water or smoke damage that can be covered and weigh in the total value of the items you’re going to be storing with the threshold provided in the policy.<br />
Storage facility insurance coverage for extreme weather or natural disasters – Most storage insurance policies through renters, homeowners, or a third-party usually cover damages caused by natural disasters, but you likely won’t find a policy protecting against a specific type of disaster. If you&#8217;re using your homeowners insurance or renters insurance to cover your storage unit contents, for example, the off-premises coverage will typically cover fire, tornadoes, and lighting, but may not include floods or earthquakes. Be sure to check your current coverage policy with serious consideration to the types of natural disasters that are most prone to occurring in the area you’ll be storing your items.</p>
<p><strong>Coverage for pests or mold:</strong> Most storage insurance policies don’t cover instances of damages caused by mold, mildew, or pests. Read over your policy thoroughly before you sign on or ask your storage unit provider what their policies are in addressing mold prevention and pest control.</p>
<p><strong>Coverage for lost or stolen items:</strong> If property kept in a storage unit gets lost or stolen, it’s highly unlikely that a storage insurance policy provided by the facility itself will cover any damages. This is especially the case if the storage facility has security cameras and features in place, which makes them less likely to be found liable for recovering those damages. Existing homeowners or renters insurance can be your best protection in the case of lost or stolen property from your storage unit, but that will solely depend on what your policy provides for “off-premises” protection.</p>
<p><strong>Coverage for highly valuable items:</strong> For valuables such as art, jewelry, furs, collectibles, and such, any storage insurance policy will likely only cover damages up to a certain limit. Double check to see what this threshold is and where it currently stands in your existing policy, then consider adding a floater to expand your coverage so these items are protected from any damages in full.</p>
<div id="facility"></div>
<h2>Should you use storage unit insurance provided by a storage facility?</h2>
<p>Insurance provided directly by storage facilities have their own limitations to what’s covered, what’s not, and up to a certain amount, but this also applies to most homeowners and renters insurance policies as well, but in different ways.</p>
<p>For example, a policy provided by a storage facility would automatically cover damages to appliances, furniture, or electronics just as your homeowners or renters insurance policy would, but this coverage may be up to an amount much lower than what your existing homeowners or renters policy provides. On the other hand, your homeowners policy may not provide enough protection for storing a large boat or RV, so vehicle insurance or finding third-party insurance may be the better option.</p>
<p>When it comes to deciding what storage insurance policy is best for you, <strong>always read over your existing homeowners or renters insurance policy thoroughly</strong> before opting into a policy provided by a storage facility. Consider the total value of what you’re going to be storing and compare that against the level of coverage a policy provides. In some cases, you can add a floater to your existing policy to include more expensive items, but not without a higher cost.</p>
<div id="neighbor"></div>
<h2>Storage unit protection with Neighbor’s Renter Guarantee</h2>
<p>Storage unit insurance is vital to protecting the possessions you store off-site, away from your home. Fortunately, <strong>Neighbor provides storage protection with a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/renter-guarantee">$25,000 Renter Guarantee</a> at no additional cost</strong>. In addition to helping you find the available storage units that fit your needs, location, and price point, Neighbor will protect your possessions or make it easier to replace them without the hassles and fine print you get with typical insurance providers.</p>
<h4>Storage Guides</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/">Storage Unit Size Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">Average Monthly Storage Unit Costs</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">Types of Storage Units</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">Storage Unit Insurance Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">How to Calculate Square Footage</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">Do You Need Storage Unit Insurance and How to Choose the Right Coverage</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Renting a Storage Unit and How to Choose the Right Type</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Wed, 24 Feb 2021 19:15:34 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Self Storage]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[renting a storage unit]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[self-storage units]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[storage units]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7248</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Renting a storage unit is a common practice whether you own or rent your home. In fact, 10% of households use rental storage options, and it&#8217;s estimated that the storage industry generates $39 billion each year. There are a variety of reasons you may decide to rent a storage unit. But determining what type of [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">Renting a Storage Unit and How to Choose the Right Type</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Renting a storage unit is a common practice whether you own or rent your home. In fact, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/self-storage-industry-statistics/#:~:text=Almost%2010%25%20of%20households%20in,is%20paying%20for%20a%20unit!">10% of households use rental storage</a> options, and it&#8217;s estimated that <a href="https://www.businessofbusiness.com/articles/the-self-storage-industry-is-in-trouble-this-data-shows-why/" target="_blank">the storage industry generates $39 billion </a>each year. There are a variety of reasons you may decide to rent a storage unit. But determining what type of unit meets your needs might be a challenge. If this is your first experience renting a storage unit, you might be surprised to find there are a variety of facilities and units to choose from. To find the best type of storage unit for your situation, read this guide. It will help you learn about specific unit options with consideration to what you&#8217;re storing and how long you expect to keep your belongings in storage.</p>
<h2>Types of Storage Facilities</h2>
<p>Before choosing the type of storage unit you need, it&#8217;s a good idea to decide what type of storage facility you&#8217;re most comfortable with. There are two main types of storage facilities, and both have a variety of options for renters. Compare the benefits of full-service storage vs. self-storage to decide what type of facility best suits your style for renting a storage unit.</p>
<h3><strong>Full-Service Storage</strong></h3>
<p>Full-service storage takes a lot of the work off your hands and can be a valuable asset if you don&#8217;t have the resources to move your own belongings. A full-service storage facility will pick up your belongings and take care of all the details of storing them for you. You can schedule pick-up and drop-off times. Also, many of these facilities create an inventory of your belongings with photos. With this option, you&#8217;ll likely be able to take care of all your storage details and access your inventory list from your smartphone.</p>
<h3><strong>Self-Storage</strong></h3>
<p>Self-storage puts you in charge of moving, documenting, and storing your belongings in a secure rental unit. This is the most widely available and most popular method of storage. A self-storage unit provides you with an affordable space to store your belongings if you don&#8217;t mind taking care of all the work. When you choose a self-storage facility, you&#8217;re responsible for delivering, documenting, and picking up your own belongings.</p>
<p><em><strong>Need a self-storage solution without the high cost? Find <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/self-storage">cheap self-storage units</a> near you.</strong></em></p>
<h3>How to choose between full-service vs. self-storage units</h3>
<p>Most often, your personal situation will dictate your storage choices. Self-storage provides the most affordable option and the ability to do everything at your own convenience. For most individuals with easy access to a vehicle, this is the obvious choice. Still, for some people, the benefits of full-service storage go a long way. Residents in urban areas often depend on public transportation and live in high-rise buildings that require the use of elevators or stairwells when moving belongings. In these situations, the convenience of full-service storage can quickly make it worth the added cost.</p>
<h2>Types of Storage Units</h2>
<p>After you&#8217;ve settled on your choice of full-service or self-storage, it&#8217;s time to consider the type of unit that will best protect your possessions and suit your needs. Not surprisingly, there are many options to cover the various types of belongings that spend time in storage. These are the most common types of storage units available:</p>
<h3>Climate-Controlled Storage Units</h3>
<p>While all indoor units are climate controlled to a degree, they don&#8217;t promise the use of heat or A/C — or any guaranteed temperature range. Climate-controlled units are insulated. They also guarantee that temperatures will be above freezing and below 80-90 degrees. Some units also offer humidity control. While indoor storage is sufficient for most items, you might want to consider the added protection of climate control if you’re renting a storage unit for sensitive items like:</p>
<ul>
<li>Fine art</li>
<li>Musical instruments</li>
<li>Antiques</li>
<li>Wood furniture</li>
<li>Electronics</li>
<li>Important documents</li>
</ul>
<p><em><strong>Need a temperature-controlled storage solution? Check out <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/climate-controlled-storage">climate controlled storage units</a> near you.</strong></em></p>
<h3>Indoor Storage Units</h3>
<p>Indoor storage units are located within a building without direct access from the outdoors. While you can&#8217;t drive right up to an indoor unit, they often provide more protection from the elements. Indoor storage units offer some climate control, the advantage of not worrying about the weather, and no exposure to outside elements when you open the door.</p>
<h3>Outdoor Storage Units</h3>
<p>Outdoor storage units are still located within a building, but they offer direct access from outside. Instead of needing to enter a building to access your unit, you can drive your car right up to the door. This provides convenience when you&#8217;re moving a lot of stuff or paying movers by the hour. However, outdoor storage units may have limited climate control. Also, opening the door exposes your belongings to outdoor weather and the elements, making your possessions more vulnerable to dampness and dust.</p>
<h3>Portable Storage Containers</h3>
<p>Also known as mobile storage, this option provides you with a storage container at your home or business. This is a common option for individuals who are in the process of moving and wish to put some belongings in storage for a short time. Portable storage containers are stored at a commercial warehouse after loading and only allow limited access to your belongings while in storage.</p>
<h3>Warehouse/Commercial Storage</h3>
<p>Typically meant for commercial use, warehouse storage is suited to the large-size storage needs of various businesses. These commercial storage units usually have loading docks to provide ample space and easy transport for large items. Due to the large amount of space required, warehouse storage units might not be as easily accessible as other types of storage units, forcing individuals to travel further to access stored items.</p>
<p><em><strong>Need a commercial-sized storage solution? Find available <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/warehouse-storage">warehouse storage units</a> near you.</strong> </em></p>
<h2>Types of Vehicle Storage</h2>
<p>When you need to store a vehicle for more than a day or two, you need to find a place that&#8217;s secure and will be properly monitored. Depending on how you need to care for your car, you may seek options that provide protection from the elements. These are the three main types of vehicle storage:</p>
<h3>Indoor Vehicle Storage</h3>
<p>This option provides the most protection and means your vehicle will be parked in a completely enclosed building. One indoor option — enclosed vehicle storage — provides a single unit that will essentially act as a personal garage, while the more common vehicle storage option places your vehicle in a large building with other vehicles.</p>
<h3>Outdoor Vehicle Storage</h3>
<p>This is the least expensive type of car storage. It&#8217;s essentially a parking space in an open area where you can safely leave your car. However, this type of storage leaves your car completely vulnerable to the elements. Potential security risks may also be an issue.</p>
<h3>Covered Vehicle Storage</h3>
<p>A form of outdoor storage, covered vehicle storage provides a roof-covered space where you&#8217;ll park your vehicle alongside other vehicles. Some of these structures have three walls, and others have less protection. Still, this option provides a roof to offer protection against the worst of nature&#8217;s elements.</p>
<p><em><strong>Need an affordable solution to store a vehicle? Check out nearby <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/car-storage">car storage units</a>, larger <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rv-storage">RV storage units</a>, available <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/garages">garage spaces</a>, vacant <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/driveway-parking">driveway parking</a>, and more.</strong></em></p>
<h2>Factors to Consider When Renting a Storage Unit</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7250" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Open-indoor-storage-unit-filled-with-boxes-and-tools.jpg" alt="Open indoor storage unit filled with boxes and tools" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<h3>Storing Duration</h3>
<p>Most storage facilities rent from month to month, but some may have minimum renting periods. The cost of storage adds up over time. It&#8217;s also essential to consider that your possessions are more vulnerable to the elements when stored for long periods of time.</p>
<h3>Size of the Unit</h3>
<p>The square footage and ceiling height of storage units can vary widely. Upon <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">measuring total square footage</a>, you generally want to rent a unit that provides a little more space than you think you&#8217;ll need. This gives you a buffer for potential miscalculations and just in case you decide to add more items to the unit. However, larger units are more expensive, so you want to avoid getting a unit significantly larger than the space you need.</p>
<h3>Cost of the Unit</h3>
<p>It&#8217;s essential to consider cost in your decision, and pricing among storage units varies widely. After all, there&#8217;s no point in securing a storage unit you can&#8217;t afford. Weigh the costs of storage against the features that are most important to you, and always make sure you factor in any fees, insurance costs, and potential consequences of late or missed payments.</p>
<h3>Storage Features and Amenities</h3>
<p>Indoor storage doesn&#8217;t necessarily mean climate controlled, and a climate-controlled storage unit doesn&#8217;t guarantee humidity control. Don&#8217;t assume you get features that aren&#8217;t in your rental contract when you&#8217;re renting a storage unit.</p>
<p>Also, consider storage features that meet your needs regarding accessibility before you make a commitment. Some facilities have 24-hour access, while others have limited access.</p>
<h3>Storage Insurance</h3>
<p>If your possessions aren&#8217;t covered by homeowners insurance, renters insurance, or another type of coverage, you&#8217;ll want to learn about the insurance options that may be provided by the facility and if their policy meets your coverage needs. Possessions in storage should always be protected with sufficient insurance coverage for replacement.</p>
<p><strong>Need help navigating insurance coverage? Use our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">storage insurance guide</a> to help you ensure your items are protected.</strong></p>
<h3>Security</h3>
<p>Storage facilities have different levels of security and surveillance on the premises. Determine if the level of security on the premises meets your standards for your property.</p>
<h3>Facility Maintenance</h3>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The space where you’re considering renting a storage unit should provide sufficient protection from damage. Ask the facility manager how they approach pest control, smoke damage, and mold prevention.</span></p>
<h3>Customer Reviews</h3>
<p>Previous customers can tell you a lot about how a company conducts business. Search out recent reviews to see if other customers are satisfied with the facility you intend to use.</p>
<h2>Renting Storage Space With Neighbor</h2>
<p>Finding and renting a storage unit that meets your needs is too often an overwhelming process that&#8217;s more difficult and more pricey than expected. With this in mind, Neighbor is your modern solution to self-storage. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">Neighbor </a>is a revolutionary company that connects residents who have extra storage space with the renters who need storage units. Neighbor provides local storage solutions that are up to 50% cheaper, 14x safer, and more reliable than traditional storage facilities. A variety of storage types and storage locations are available, and renters are provided with a $25,000 renter&#8217;s guarantee.</p>
<h4>Storage Guides</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/">Storage Unit Size Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">Average Monthly Storage Unit Costs</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">Types of Storage Units</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">Storage Unit Insurance Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">How to Calculate Square Footage</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">Renting a Storage Unit and How to Choose the Right Type</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Reupholster a Chair — The Complete Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-reupholster-chair-complete-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-reupholster-chair-complete-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 23 Feb 2021 19:00:02 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Frugal Living]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[furniture]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[lifestyle tips]]></category>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7141</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>There are a variety of reasons you may want to reupholster a chair. Maybe you found a great thrift store purchase that has great bones but just doesn&#8217;t fit your unique sense of style as you plan to move into your first apartment. Perhaps you pulled a chair out of storage, only to discover that [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-reupholster-chair-complete-guide/">How to Reupholster a Chair — The Complete Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>There are a variety of reasons you may want to reupholster a chair. Maybe you found a great thrift store purchase that has great bones but just doesn&#8217;t fit your unique sense of style as you plan to move into your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/first-apartment-checklist-top-11-apartment-essentials/">first apartment</a>. Perhaps you pulled a chair out of <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/are-storage-units-a-good-investment-during-a-recession/">storage</a>, only to discover that it needed to be cleaned up before you could use it. Check out this step by step tutorial to learn how to reupholster a chair.</p>
<h2>Step One: Gather your materials.</h2>
<p>Before you start your reupholstering project and give your chair new life, make sure you have the right materials on hand. As you prep for how to reupholster a chair, you may need:</p>
<ul>
<li>Pliers</li>
<li>A staple gun and staples</li>
<li>New fabric</li>
<li>Upholstery-strength thread in a matching color (your standard thread may not be adequate for this project)</li>
<li>Foam</li>
<li>Temporary fabric pen or pencil (or chalk)</li>
<li>Scissors</li>
<li>Straight pins</li>
<li>Sewing machine (or a plan to hand sew your new upholstery)</li>
<li>A flathead screwdriver</li>
<li>Upholstery tacks</li>
<li>Batting, if needed</li>
</ul>
<h2>Step Two: Take extensive photos of the original chair.</h2>
<p>Once you&#8217;ve searched for &#8220;How to reupholster a chair,&#8221; you might think you&#8217;re ready to start stripping fabric off of the old one. There&#8217;s one step, however, that you need to take first. No, you&#8217;re not in love with the old fabric. You may not like the look of the chair at all. Before you get started, however, take extensive pictures of the existing chair.</p>
<p>Not only will you want them for your later before and after display, but you may also need those photos to help establish exactly where the seat cushion goes or exactly how those buttons were sewn into the fabric. Those photos will make it easy for you to look back at the original and determine what to do next. Make sure you remove the dust cover and turn the chair upside down to get a full look at all the details of the chair’s underside, too.</p>
<h2>Step Three: Carefully disassemble the chair and remove the old fabric.</h2>
<p>You may need to take several pieces off the chair, including the arms or the feet at the bottom, to reveal the chair&#8217;s bones as you consider how to reupholster it. Do not tear the old fabric since this will make an easy template for you to use for your new fabric.</p>
<p>As you take your fabric apart, mark each piece’s current location on the chair with your chalk or a fabric pen. Make sure you mark any legs or other features of the furniture since you may need to make holes for them to pass through.</p>
<p>Take note of the process as you take the fabric off. The last piece you remove will be the first piece you put back on when you put your chair back together. Consider numbering the pieces as you take them off so that you can easily put them back on in the same order. Then, you won&#8217;t find yourself looking for &#8220;How to put a chair back together&#8221; instead of just &#8220;How to reupholster a chair.&#8221;</p>
<p>You should also save any of the findings as you take your chair apart. You may, for example, need to keep track of buttons, tape strips, and other important items that come off of the chair. Then you can easily recover or refresh them and put them back on.</p>
<h2>Step Four: Take a look at the batting.</h2>
<p>While you have your old chair uncovered, take a look at the batting along the back and seat. Is it old, stained, or worn down? Can you see signs that it might be time to replace the batting? As part of the chair reupholstering process, you may need to put in new batting.</p>
<p>If so, carefully remove the old batting from the chair. Save the old batting to use as a pattern for the new pieces.</p>
<h2>Step Five: Examine your springs and webbing.</h2>
<p>Take a look at the springs and webbing on the chair while you have them exposed. Do they need to be replaced or repaired? If so, now is the time to take care of that part of the project. Make sure they are still structurally sound, too. It&#8217;s not just a question of how to reupholster a chair. It&#8217;s also making sure your chair is safe and functional.</p>
<h2>Step Six: Fix up the frame and legs, if desired.</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7144" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Painting-the-frame-of-a-chair.jpg" alt="Painting the frame of a chair" width="1254" height="837" /></p>
<p>If you&#8217;re planning to <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/8-tricks-for-repairing-re_b_5574803" target="_blank">update the wooden parts of your chair</a> while you&#8217;re handling your updates, it&#8217;s best to do it while the fabric is removed. First, sand down the legs. Then, prime them. Wait for the primer to dry, then paint the chair. Allow it to dry completely before you move forward with the rest of your project. Repairing an old chair can take more time if you need to make repairs to the frame and legs, but it&#8217;s well worth the effort when you have a great piece of furniture in hand! Take advantage of the extra time to do more research into how to choose the right fabric.</p>
<h2>Step Seven: Replace the batting on the chair.</h2>
<p>Cut out a new piece of batting in the same size and pattern as the old one. Spread it across the chair back first and staple it into place. Then, cover the seat in the same way. At this stage, if you want to create a new look for your chair or make it a little more comfortable, you may want to add a little additional batting. This is a great look at how to reupholster your chair in a place that won&#8217;t show later!</p>
<h2>Step Eight: Create your new pattern.</h2>
<p>Lay the original upholstery pieces down on the new fabric. Pay attention to all the details, including:</p>
<ul>
<li>The grain of the fabric</li>
<li>The placement of any patterns or motifs in the new fabric</li>
<li>The direction of the pattern</li>
</ul>
<p>Make sure the old and new fabric match to have your newly reupholstered chair look its best. Once you&#8217;ve laid it in place, sketch around the old upholstery with your chalk or, conversely, pin it in place and simply cut around the pins. Leave an additional 2-3 inches around the outside of the pattern so that you have room to staple the new fabric in place.</p>
<p>Transfer your notes from your old fabric to your new fabric, including any notes about the direction the fabric should go and which piece is which. Make these notes on the wrong side of the fabric so that you don&#8217;t leave any visible markings on the new piece.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Reupholster a Chair:</h4>
<p>Paying attention to the grain of the fabric isn’t just good for its aesthetic. If you orient the fabric so the grain runs from back to front (the direction people will rub the fabric as they sit down and stand up), the fabric will last longer.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step Nine: Attach the new upholstery to the chair.</h2>
<p>Place each piece of fabric on the chair in the reverse order that you took the old fabric off. This is where those notes really come in handy! Before you start stapling your pieces in place, take the time to pin them onto the chair and make sure that they fit properly. In some cases, you may need to trim excess fabric for a trimmer, more streamlined fit.</p>
<p>Staple the fabric into place. Use plenty of staples to make sure that your fabric is firmly attached. If you&#8217;re considering how to reupholster a chair for long-term use, those staples are one of the key elements of its structure.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Reupholster a Chair</h4>
<p>If you notice that the fabric moves or has become wrinkled, then you may need to tighten the fit and try again. You can always remove your staples with a flathead screwdriver and try again.</p></blockquote>
<p>Note that the chair seat may be a separate piece from the back and sides of the chair. You may need to put the seat back in place after adding the new upholstery fabric.</p>
<p>Once you have stapled the fabric in place, cut away any excess fabric if needed to fix the fit of the chair seat.</p>
<h2>Step Ten: Add any details back to the chair.</h2>
<p>Take a look at the details you removed from the old chair. These include the welting, the big buttons, and any other details. Refer back to your pictures if you have any questions about placement or details.</p>
<p>For the welting, start by using the old pieces as a guide. Cut two-inch-wide bias strips that go around the seat apron, then join them with diagonal seams. Fold the bias strip around the cord. Finally, sew it in place.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Reupholster a Chair</h4>
<p>You can sew this on your sewing machine using a zipper foot to streamline the process or sew by hand. It will be much faster if you use your sewing machine.</p></blockquote>
<p>Tack strips can, at this stage, be used to create a cleaner appearance and a better edge on the sides of your chair.</p>
<p>Start by stapling the fabric for the upholstery loosely in place. Keeping the fabric taut, fold the edge under, and hammer the tack strip in.</p>
<p>Finally, put any buttons or other accents back in place on your fabric.</p>
<h2>Step Eleven: Reattach the rest of the chair.</h2>
<p>Did you take off the arms of the chair or remove other pieces? Now is the time to put them back together. Make sure to reuse the existing screw holes so that you can keep your chair in great shape.</p>
<p>Reupholstering is a great DIY project that can help you completely makeover an existing piece of furniture. With this tutorial, you can upgrade your home decor and provide those extra special touches that will have the chair looking its best. You can also use this process to reupholster a headboard or a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">couch </a>if you&#8217;re ready to tackle your next upholstery project!</p>
<h2>Additional Cleaning and Repairing Resources</h2>
<ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-car-seats-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean Car Seats</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-mattress-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean a Mattress</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-fish-tank/">How to Clean a Fish Tank</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/clean-wood-furniture/">How to Clean Wood Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/outdoor-furniture-cleaning/">How to Clean your Outdoor Patio and Lawn Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/spring-cleaning-list/">Spring Cleaning List</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-reupholster-chair-complete-guide/">How to Reupholster a Chair — The Complete Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>65% of 2021 Weddings Were Postponed In 2020 Due to COVID-19</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/65-of-2021-weddings-were-postponed-in-2020-due-to-covid-19/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/65-of-2021-weddings-were-postponed-in-2020-due-to-covid-19/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 23 Feb 2021 12:00:03 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7214</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>How is COVID-19 affecting 2021 weddings? This survey sheds light from postponements to canceled events to trimmed down guest lists. Check out our results on the state of weddings amid the ongoing pandemic.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/65-of-2021-weddings-were-postponed-in-2020-due-to-covid-19/">65% of 2021 Weddings Were Postponed In 2020 Due to COVID-19</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>There’s no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic has turned the wedding industry on its head.</p>
<p>From limits on venues and public gatherings to mask mandates, lockdowns, and travel restrictions, brides and grooms have been navigating a sea of uncertainty, all while trying to make big decisions about their big days.</p>
<p>We wanted to learn more about the effects of the pandemic on weddings in 2020, 2021, and beyond — so we surveyed engaged couples to learn about their plans, concerns, and hopes. Some of what we learned wasn’t all that surprising — like that most people planning a wedding in 2021 are concerned about their guests contracted COVID-19 — but there were some surprises in the data, too — like that a 75% majority of people are worried their 2021 wedding will only be remembered as a “pandemic wedding.”</p>
<p><span id="more-7214"></span></p>
<p>Here are some of the key things we found you can jump to:</p>
<ul>
<li><a href="#1">65% said their 2021 wedding was postponed from 2020.</a></li>
<li><a href="#2">51% said they aren&#8217;t getting married at their ideal venue.</a></li>
<li><a href="#3">72% are inviting fewer people and 65% have considered not inviting guests they consider at-risk.</a></li>
<li><a href="#4">70% are worried about guests contracting COVID at their wedding.</a></li>
<li><a href="#5">43% are less excited for their wedding day and 60% are worried their wedding won&#8217;t be fun.</a></li>
<li><a href="#6">73% are worried their wedding will be remembered as a &#8220;Pandemic Wedding&#8221; including 49% who strongly agreed with that statement.</a></li>
<li><a href="#7">26% are canceling events like engagement parties and bridal showers and 30% aren&#8217;t planning a honeymoon.</a></li>
</ul>
<div id="1"></div>
<h2>65% of 2021 Weddings Were Rescheduled After Being Postponed in 2020</h2>
<p>Barring any more pandemic-related delays, 2021 could be a <em>huge</em> year for weddings. 65% of people getting married in 2021 said they originally planned for a 2020 wedding, but rescheduled due to the pandemic.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7216 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/01-Postponed-Weddings-2020.png" alt="65% of 2021 Weddings Were Rescheduled After Being Postponed in 2020" width="1789" height="520" /></p>
<p>What’s even more surprising about the number of postponed weddings taking place this year is how they might have affected the usual “peak” season for weddings.</p>
<p>Typically, the season with the most weddings is fall, with October being peak time for tying the knot. But this year, the season with the most weddings is late winter to early spring.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7217 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/02-2020-vs-2021-Wedding-Month-Distribution.png" alt="2020 vs 2021 wedding month distribution" width="1789" height="1170" /></p>
<p>That seems to be driven by all the rescheduled weddings, many of which are taking place during the “off season.” 42% of those who postponed their weddings are now planning to get married (or have recently tied the knot) from January to April, compared to just 30% of people who chose those dates who originally planned to marry in 2021.</p>
<div id="2"></div>
<h2>More Than Half of Respondents Aren’t Getting Married at Their Ideal Venue</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7218 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/03-Ideal-Wedding-Venue.png" alt="More Than Half of Respondents Aren’t Getting Married at Their Ideal Venue" width="1789" height="648" /></p>
<p>51% of people getting married in 2021 said they had to forgo saying their “I do’s” at the venue of their dreams. This is likely due to constantly changing local restrictions on crowd sizes and public gatherings, as well as ongoing restrictions on travel in much of the world.</p>
<div id="3"></div>
<h2>Most People Are Limiting or Reducing Their Guest Lists</h2>
<p>It should come as no surprise when restrictions on group gatherings are such a common social distancing procedure. But most people getting married in 2021 said the pandemic has affected their guest list.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7219 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/04-Wedding-Invite-Impace-of-COVID.png" alt="Most People Are Limiting or Reducing Their Guest Lists" width="1789" height="779" /></p>
<p>72% said they’re inviting fewer people to their wedding. And 65% said they’ve considered not inviting guests who they consider at-risk, like elderly family members.</p>
<div id="4"></div>
<h2>Overall, People Think Weddings Will Be Less Fun This Year</h2>
<p>Normally, all the stress of planning a wedding pays off when the special day arrives and the bride and groom can party to celebrate their love. This year, though, the stress of planning a wedding in a pandemic is clearly taking a toll.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7220 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/05-How-COVID-is-Effecting-2021-Weddings.png" alt="Overall, People Think Weddings Will Be Less Fun This Year" width="1789" height="916" /></p>
<p>43% of people said they’re less excited for their wedding day because of the pandemic. 60% said they’re worried their wedding will be less fun.</p>
<p>And they’re not only thinking about themselves — people are also worried about how others will view their weddings. 73% said they’re worried that their big day will be remembered as a “pandemic wedding;” nearly half of people are extremely worried about that. And surprisingly, men are more worried than women in this regard — 77% of men don’t want their wedding to be remembered as a “pandemic wedding,” compared to 68% of women.</p>
<div id="5"></div>
<h2>Many Wedding-Related Events Are Being Canceled in 2021</h2>
<p>26% of people getting married in 2021 said they’re canceling events like engagement parties and bridal showers. Bachelor and bachelorette parties are also being skipped, but women are more likely to give that up than men — 30% of women said they’re not having a bachelorette party, while only 13% of men said they’re not having a bachelor party.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7221 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/06-Wedding-Related-Events-Canceled.png" alt="Many Wedding-Related Events Are Being Canceled in 2021" width="1789" height="991" /></p>
<p>30% of couples getting married this year aren’t planning a honeymoon, likely because of ongoing travel restrictions. More than half of them plan to save the money they would have spent on a honeymoon, or use it for everyday expenses.</p>
<div id="6"></div>
<h2>The Pandemic Might Show Up at Weddings In More Light-Hearted Ways</h2>
<p>Surprisingly, not everyone planning a 2021 wedding wants to avoid the pandemic and its effects. 29% of respondents said they plan to have pandemic-related decorations or use the pandemic as a theme for their wedding.<em><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7222 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/07-Pandemic-is-Changing-2021-Weddings-Themes.png" alt="The Pandemic Might Show Up at Weddings In More Light-Hearted Ways" width="1789" height="1535" /></em></p>
<div id="7"></div>
<h2>Overall, Couples Are Struggling to Balance Pandemic Safety and Their Dream Weddings</h2>
<p>One of the most overarching themes that emerged from this data is that COVID-19 is still a major concern for brides and grooms in 2021.</p>
<p>70% said they’re worried about their guests contracting COVID-19. That number increased as respondents got older, showing that the pandemic is less of a concern for young people than it is for those over 35.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7223 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/08-Couples-Worried-Guests-Will-Contract-COVID.png" alt="Overall, Couples Are Struggling to Balance Pandemic Safety and Their Dream Weddings" width="1789" height="1493" /></p>
<p>Additionally, 70% of respondents said it’s important to them that guests get the COVID-19 vaccine if they’re able to.</p>
<p>There is some good news amid all the worry, however. Only 8% of survey respondents said that they and their partner disagree about COVID safety procedures at their wedding.</p>
<p>And, with all the precautions brides and grooms say they’re taking this year, we’re glad to see many people are acting <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/">so neighborly</a> — setting aside some aspects of their dream weddings to make sure their guests stay as safe as possible.</p>
<h2>Methodology</h2>
<p>Using Pollfish.com, we surveyed 1,017 people on Feb. 1, 2021, who said they are currently engaged or have gotten married in 2021. Their ages ranged from 18 to 54, broken down like this:</p>
<ul>
<li>Ages 18-24: 15.14% of respondents;</li>
<li>Ages 25-34: 30.38% of respondents;</li>
<li>Ages 35-44: 41% of respondents;</li>
<li>Ages 45-54: 13.47% of respondents.</li>
</ul>
<p>Survey respondents were all from the United States, and came from 45 states and the District of Columbia.</p>
<p>57.33% of respondents were male. 42.67% were female.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/65-of-2021-weddings-were-postponed-in-2020-due-to-covid-19/">65% of 2021 Weddings Were Postponed In 2020 Due to COVID-19</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Store Onions and Keep Them Fresh</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-onions-and-keep-them-fresh/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-onions-and-keep-them-fresh/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 18 Feb 2021 19:00:52 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Lifestyle]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Frugal Living]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to store]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Life Hacks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7135</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Onions are great to add to a variety of meals to increase flavor and enhance the taste. Whether you grow onions or buy them from the grocery store, it&#8217;s important to know how to store onions properly so they last. When stored properly, some onions can last for months. Even onion types with the highest [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-onions-and-keep-them-fresh/">How to Store Onions and Keep Them Fresh</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Onions are great to add to a variety of meals to increase flavor and enhance the taste. Whether you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/make-raised-garden-bed/">grow onions</a> or buy them from the grocery store, it&#8217;s important to know how to store onions properly so they last. When stored properly, some onions can last for months. Even onion types with the highest moisture content can stay fresh for weeks if they&#8217;re stored the right way. Use these storage tips to help extend the shelf life of your onions.</p>
<h2>Storing Sweet Onions</h2>
<p>While some onions last for months, sweet onions have a high moisture content. This means they&#8217;re more likely to spoil quickly because they&#8217;re prone to mold and sprouting. If you know you won&#8217;t be using sweet onions quickly, make a short-term plan on how to store them. Wrap each one in a paper towel and store them in the refrigerator. Sweet onions will only keep a few weeks with this method, so plan to use them soon.</p>
<h2>Storing Dry Bulb Onions</h2>
<p>Those strong onions that you harvest late in the fall have the potential to last for months when you keep them in a dark, dry place. In fact, the compound that makes you cry when you cut onions helps preserve them. Bulb onions have the longest shelf life of all onions and are the best type to grow for storage or buy in bulk. Like potatoes and some other root vegetables, onions should be stored in a cool, dry place. Onions also need ample ventilation, so it&#8217;s important to avoid leaving them in plastic bags.</p>
<p>Clean pantyhose provide the perfect storage container for dry bulb onions. Cut off the legs of a pair of pantyhose. Drop an onion into the foot of one of the legs and tie a knot to secure it in place. Keep adding onions and tying knots until both legs are full. Using this tactic with a mesh bag or netting works similarly. Hang the pantyhose in a cool, dry place for storage that lasts up to 8 months. When you need an onion, cut a slit in one of the tied-off sections.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Store Onions</h4>
<p>Don&#8217;t store onions near other produce. Other fruits and vegetables can absorb the flavor.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Storing Cut Onions</h2>
<p>If you&#8217;ve been <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/survey-quarantine-brought-families-closer-together/">cooking more than usual</a>, you may find the need to store leftover onions. Most recipes call for cut or diced onions. However, it&#8217;s common to only use part of an onion, or less than you expected. Even when you slice onions for onion rings, they stack up quickly. In the past, it was a common idea that cut onions are a magnet for bacteria. This isn&#8217;t true. It&#8217;s perfectly safe to store cut onions as long as you put them in the fridge in an airtight container. Whether your onion leftovers are sliced, diced, or cut in half, you simply need to place them in a sealed container and put them in the refrigerator. Diced and sliced onions last <a href="https://www.ams.usda.gov/sites/default/files/media/A-A-20193D_Onions_Bulb_RTU.pdf" target="_blank">seven to ten days in the fridge</a>. Whole onions last 10-14 days when refrigerated.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Store Onions</h4>
<p>Cooked onions need to be stored in the refrigerator, as well. They can be stored for up to five days in a sealed container.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Storing Green Onions</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7137" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Storing-spring-onions-in-water-to-keep-them-fresh.jpg" alt="Storing spring onions in water to keep them fresh" width="836" height="1254" /></p>
<p>Scallions, or green onions, are used in a variety of recipes, but it&#8217;s often difficult to use them all at once. Keeping green onions fresh can be even more difficult than other onion types. Unfortunately, the green part can quickly grow limp and slimy if it’s not stored correctly. Instead of storing scallions in the package you purchased them in, try one of these methods.</p>
<h3>Store Them in a Jar</h3>
<p>Like most onions, green onions don&#8217;t necessarily need to be stored in the refrigerator. Instead, place them in a heavy-bottomed jar that&#8217;s tall enough to keep the stalks from flopping over. Add just enough cold or room temperature water to cover the roots (an inch or two) and place the jar on your window sill. Add water or change the water every few days as needed.</p>
<h3>Place Them in the Refrigerator</h3>
<p>If you don&#8217;t have a suitable window sill for your scallions, you can put them far in the refrigerator. If you use this method, then place a plastic bag over the green tips to keep humidity in. The bag doesn&#8217;t need to be sealed tightly, but it should be cinched tightly enough to keep moisture in. This can be accomplished with a partly sealed Ziploc bag or a rubber band place where the bag meets the top of the jar.</p>
<h3>Use a Damp Paper Towel</h3>
<p>Since a jar can be easily knocked over, a paper towel can provide a suitable replacement. Dampen (don&#8217;t soak) the paper towel and wrap the green onions. Place the wrapped onions in a plastic bag or storage container to preserve moisture. It&#8217;s not necessary for the bag to be sealed tight, but you need to dampen the paper towel when it begins to dry out.</p>
<h2>Can I Freeze Onions for Storage?</h2>
<p>Yes. However, frozen onions won&#8217;t thaw with the same texture as raw onions, so they&#8217;re best used in recipes that call for cooked onions.</p>
<p>If you want to learn how to store onions by freezing them, peel and cut them first. The <a href="https://www.onions-usa.org/all-about-onions/how-tos/" target="_blank">freezing process will cause onions to lose their firm texture</a>, so cutting them after thawing would be difficult. Determine how your onions will be used, then cut, slice, or dice them accordingly. To freeze them, spread the cut or chopped onions in a single layer on a baking sheet and flash freeze them. Once frozen, place onions in a freezer bag, eliminate the excess air, and seal it.</p>
<p>Other long term storage options for onions include dehydration and even <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/the-ultimate-guide-to-water-bath-canning/">canning </a>or pickling.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Store Onions</h4>
<p>If you have an abundance of onions to freeze, work in batches. Onions have a strong odor while freezing, and the foods in your fridge and freezer are likely to absorb the smell and taste if you work for long periods of time. Once frozen, however, the onions will lose their overpowering smell.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Know When You Should Throw Out Onions</h2>
<p>Storing onions for as long as possible makes perfect sense. Buying in bulk and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-to-los-angeles-urban-farming-and-starting-an-urban-garden/">growing your own onions</a> can also help you save money. However, you need to know when they&#8217;re no longer safe. It&#8217;s important to check on your onions frequently, even when they&#8217;re in a dry, dark place. When one becomes spoiled, it can contaminate the surrounding ones and spoil the whole bunch (just like apples). So, how can you tell your onions are going bad?</p>
<p>Discoloration is one of the first signs your onions are spoiled. Look for brown, gray, or black spots. Fuzzy growths are also a bad sign. These spots are mold growth. Luckily, this is easy to see and the most common type of spoilage in onions. A different type of spoilage causes the appearance of slime and your onions to grow soft and mushy. Microorganisms cause this. Discard onions that show signs of spoilage.</p>
<h2>Choosing Onions That Store Well</h2>
<p>Many cooks enjoy growing onions or buy them in bulk so that they&#8217;ll always be available. It&#8217;s no wonder, as onions seem to work with practically anything and it&#8217;s easy to keep them on hand once you know how to store onions. You can enjoy them in salads, stirfry, mixed veggies, and a variety of soups and stews. While it&#8217;s true that properly stored onions can last for months, not all onions have the same storage properties. If you plan to buy onions in bulk or grow them for winter storage, look for these types:</p>
<h3>Yellow Onions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Bridger</li>
<li>Copeland</li>
<li>Copra</li>
<li>Ebenezer</li>
<li>Patterson</li>
<li>Pontiac</li>
<li>Stuttgarter</li>
<li>Sweet Sandwich</li>
<li>Talon</li>
<li>Yellow Globe</li>
<li>Yellow Sweet Spanish</li>
</ul>
<h3>Red Onions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Red Bull</li>
<li>Creole</li>
<li>Burgermaster</li>
<li>Red Wind</li>
<li>Wethersfield</li>
<li>Red Zeppelin</li>
</ul>
<h3>White Onions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Southport White Globe</li>
<li>Stuttgarter Heirloom</li>
<li>White Sweet Spanish</li>
</ul>
<p>Onions are a favorite vegetable that enhances a variety of dishes. Since they store well, buying in bulk and growing onions is a great solution for having your favorite foods on hand all the time and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/save-money-fast/">save money</a>. Taking the time to learn about the types of onions and how to store onions properly can help you with this process. Whether you freeze, refrigerate, or dry store your onions, keep them on hand to create all your favorite meals.</p>
<h2>Additional Cleaning and Home Advice Resources</h2>
<ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-car-seats-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean Car Seats</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-mattress-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean a Mattress</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-fish-tank/">How to Clean a Fish Tank</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/clean-wood-furniture/">How to Clean Wood Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/outdoor-furniture-cleaning/">How to Clean your Outdoor Patio and Lawn Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/spring-cleaning-list/">Spring Cleaning List</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-onions-and-keep-them-fresh/">How to Store Onions and Keep Them Fresh</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Things to Buy for a New House &#038; New Home Checklist for First-Time Homebuyers</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/things-to-buy-for-a-new-house-new-home-checklist-for-first-time-homebuyers/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/things-to-buy-for-a-new-house-new-home-checklist-for-first-time-homebuyers/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 16 Feb 2021 19:00:15 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Organization]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving checklist]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[new house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7070</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Whether you&#8217;re a first-time homebuyer or you&#8217;re moving to a new area, moving into a new home is an exciting time. If you&#8217;re a homeowner dealing with the chaos of moving, you may you won&#8217;t have to worry about new purchases if you get everything packed and loaded. Similarly, if you&#8217;re buying your first home, [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/things-to-buy-for-a-new-house-new-home-checklist-for-first-time-homebuyers/">Things to Buy for a New House &#038; New Home Checklist for First-Time Homebuyers</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Whether you&#8217;re a first-time homebuyer or you&#8217;re moving to a new area, moving into a new home is an exciting time. If you&#8217;re a homeowner dealing with the chaos of moving, you may you won&#8217;t have to worry about new purchases if you get everything packed and loaded. Similarly, if you&#8217;re buying your first home, you may be prepared with many home items received at a wedding party or what you hope to receive at <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/throw-housewarming-party/">your upcoming housewarming party</a>. Still, a new home may not have some of the essentials you need. Use this checklist of things to buy for a new house to get prepared.</p>
<h2>What Should I Replace When I Move?</h2>
<p>When moving, it&#8217;s a good idea to toss or donate items that can be easily replaced or are difficult and expensive to move.</p>
<p>There are several items you might not want to pack up and take to your new home. Deciding which items you&#8217;ll purchase new can help you create a packing plan before you move. Consider trashing or donating items that fall in these categories:</p>
<h3>Easy to Replace Items</h3>
<p>There are many items you might not want to take to your new home that are easy to replace. For instance, dirty items like trashcans, toilet brushes and plungers, area rugs, brooms, mops, and shower curtains are easier and healthier to trash and replace. Aging kitchenware like worn utensils and stained or cracked Tupperware are good options for replacement, as well. Get rid of worn towels and bed linens, too. Your new home will feel fresh with these replacements.</p>
<h3>Expensive to Move Items</h3>
<p>Cheap furniture can be expensive to move. If yours is aging or damaged, replacement might be a better option.</p>
<h3>Broken or Worn Out Items</h3>
<p>Large items like mattresses and furniture can be difficult to move and take up a considerable amount of space in the moving truck. Get rid of items that you would likely replace in the near future. Mattresses should be replaced after eight years — or earlier if yours is moldy, sagging, or badly stained. Broken furniture can cause injuries and should be replaced when possible.</p>
<h3>Perishable Items</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re traveling a long distance, you&#8217;re not likely to attempt to bring the contents of your fridge. Even if you&#8217;re only moving across town, attempting to keep perishable food chilled isn&#8217;t worth the risk.</p>
<h2>Things to Buy for a New House</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7073" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/New-homeowner-buying-essential-cleaning-supplies.jpg" alt="New homeowner buying essential cleaning supplies" width="1254" height="837" /></p>
<p>If you&#8217;re buying a brand new house and you&#8217;re already armed with a wealth of supplies, you&#8217;re one step ahead. However, there are some new things you&#8217;ll need for your new home for everyday needs and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-organization-guide/">organization</a>. Not everything from your current home fits the items in your new place. Besides, replaceable items should be fresh in your sparkling new home. If you&#8217;re buying a home for the first time, you can catch up. While everything might not be essential for the first night in your new home, you&#8217;ll need these necessities pretty quickly.</p>
<h3>Safety Essentials for Your New Home</h3>
<p>Things to buy for a new house don&#8217;t always fall into the traditional categories of furniture and home decor. These items are essential to keep you and your family safe in your new home:</p>
<ul>
<li>Insurance: Talk to your insurance agent before the move to ensure you have the coverage you need to protect your new home and the possessions inside. While your home insurance might be rolled into your loan, you may be interested in additional coverage like an umbrella policy. Preparing ahead will help ensure you don&#8217;t forget this essential coverage.</li>
<li>Fire Extinguishers: Even if you keep safety items updated in your current home, it can be easy to forget that your new home may not be equipped with fire extinguishers.</li>
<li>New Locks: No matter how much you trust the previous owners of your home, you don&#8217;t have any idea how many people have keys (family members, repairmen, renters, or contractors) to access your new home. The best solution is to have the locks changed as soon as possible.</li>
<li>Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Your new home isn&#8217;t exactly like your current home and may be larger. Purchase these essential alarms before you move in, and install them as soon as possible. Make sure you <a href="https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/Staying-safe/Safety-equipment/Smoke-alarms/Installing-and-maintaining-smoke-alarms" target="_blank">install smoke alarms</a> in each bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on each level of the house. Ensure you install smoke alarms in all the recommended areas and consider interconnecting them so all smoke alarms go off when one is triggered.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Everyday Essentials</h3>
<p>Not everything from your home is something you want to pack up and bring to your pristine new abode. Think about it: you don&#8217;t want to pack that old toilet brush, right? Dirty and potentially germy items should top your list of things to buy for a new house. Certain items in your current home also won&#8217;t fit or match your new home. Others should automatically be replaced. Add these everyday essentials to your new home checklist to make your new home fresh:</p>
<h4>Fixtures</h4>
<ul>
<li>Window Treatments: The windows in your new home most likely aren&#8217;t the same size as those in your current home. Besides, your home is new, and your decor should be new and different as well. Whether you prefer blinds, curtains, or other decorative shades, you&#8217;ll want to get these installed quickly. You don&#8217;t want to completely eliminate your privacy on your first day in your new home, and you can be sure your neighbors will appreciate your modesty.</li>
<li>Shower Curtain: You&#8217;re not likely to drag the old one with you, but it can be easy to forget this essential item. After a long day of loading and unloading a moving truck, your shower will be little help without a shower curtain liner.</li>
</ul>
<h4>Supplies</h4>
<ul>
<li>Toilet Brush and Plunger: This may top your list of things to buy for a new house. You don&#8217;t want to pack these germy items along with your belongings and bring them into your new home. Purchase some new ones before or shortly after the move. You might want to shop for a new toilet seat while you&#8217;re at it.</li>
<li>Garbage Cans and Liners: Getting rid of potentially germy items that are easy to replace is one way to start fresh. New garbage cans indoors and out can help with the fresh new feeling in your new home. Besides, this is just one more thing you don&#8217;t want taking up space in the moving truck.</li>
<li>Light Bulbs: The light bulbs might have been working when you viewed your new home, but you can never predict when one will go out. The types of bulbs that fit into different fixtures can vary widely, so you&#8217;ll probably want to purchase an assortment.</li>
<li>Hangers: Closet space may be one of the things you love about your new home, but you can&#8217;t use it if you don&#8217;t have hangers. Hangers can be unwieldy to pack, so it might be worth it to buy new ones instead of packing the ones you already own.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Cleaning Supplies</h3>
<p>Your new home looks great now, but it will get dirty if you give it a few days without essential cleaning supplies. Instead of packing potentially leaky bottles of soaps and cleaners, purchase your favorite cleaners soon after the move. While you&#8217;re at it, stock up on all the essentials you need for keeping your new home neat and tidy:</p>
<ul>
<li>Kitchen Sponges, Dish Cloths, and Dish Towels: Your pristine kitchen deserves new gear to keep it that way. Purchase new sponges, cleaning clothes, dish essentials, and scouring pads for your new kitchen.</li>
<li>Mop and Broom: Your old mop and broom are definitely not items you want taking up space and trailing germs and dirt along for the move. Add a new mop and broom (and maybe even a vacuum cleaner) to your cleaning supplies new home list and toss the old ones before packing the truck.</li>
<li>Laundry Supplies: Take inventory of the supplies in your laundry room and determine how many items are too worn or broken to be worth taking and loading in the moving truck. Items you may want to replace include your ironing board, iron, aging or damaged hampers, plastic laundry baskets, and storage bins or baskets.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Upgrades</h3>
<p>A move can be a great time to consider the things it&#8217;s time to replace. For instance, your mattress and pillows weren&#8217;t designed to last forever. Consider replacing items that are large and difficult to move or any items you would replace within a year. These things to buy for a new house are easily overlooked, but they are necessities:</p>
<ul>
<li>Mattress and Boxsprings: Most mattresses have <a href="https://www.nbcnews.com/better/pop-culture/here-s-how-often-you-should-replace-everything-your-bedroom-ncna844686" target="_blank">outlived their lifespan in 10 years</a>. If yours is nearing a decade, it&#8217;s probably a good idea to replace it. Since you&#8217;ll need a boxspring that belongs with your new mattress, toss it, too.</li>
<li>Bedding: If your sheets are old, faded, or stained, it&#8217;s time for a new set. If you&#8217;ve had them longer than a year or two, it&#8217;s time for a replacement anyway.</li>
<li>Toilet Seat: Before you sit in your pristine new bathroom, you may want a new toilet seat.</li>
<li>Towels: Aging, rough, or threadbare towels should be replaced during the move. Besides, you really need a matching set for your new home.</li>
<li>Dining Set: The family kitchen table sees a lot of wear. If yours is aging, worn, or damaged, it&#8217;s time for a replacement. These items are difficult to pack neatly in a moving truck, and you can purchase a new set that fits neatly in your new dining room.</li>
<li>Dishes: If your dishes are mismatched, worn, and relatively inexpensive, consider replacing them and taking one more fragile item off your moving list.</li>
<li>Rugs: All rugs see a lot of foot traffic, which means dirt, dust, and germs. Additionally, your new home has a different layout and color scheme that most likely won&#8217;t support your aging rugs.</li>
</ul>
<h2>New Home Checklist for First-Time Homebuyers</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7074" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Homeowner-hanging-curtains-in-her-new-home.jpg" alt="Homeowner hanging curtains in her new home" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>As a new homeowner, trying to determine all the things to buy for a new house can be overwhelming. Once you have a list of essential furniture, it&#8217;s easy to think you&#8217;ll have everything you need. Unfortunately, there&#8217;s a lot more to furnishing a home than furniture.</p>
<p>Necessities are the items most people don&#8217;t think about until they&#8217;re unavailable, and your home needs a lot of them. Luckily, an online visit to Amazon can help you get most of the items you forgot delivered directly to your new home. This room-by-room new house checklist can help you make sure you have the things you need when you need them in your new home.</p>
<h3>Things to Buy for a New House Before the Move</h3>
<p>Your home may be move-in ready, but there are a few things to take care of before you arrive.</p>
<ul>
<li>Insurance: If you&#8217;re paying a mortgage, your home insurance might be rolled into your loan. Still, you might need additional coverage like flood insurance if you&#8217;re in a high-risk area or umbrella insurance to ensure all your new possessions are covered.</li>
<li>Utilities: You don&#8217;t want to spend the first night in your new home without heat, lights, or water. Call all the utility companies for your new home, and make sure everything is turned on when you arrive. Water, electricity, internet, and gas should be on <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">your pre-move checklist</a>.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Essentials</h3>
<p>No matter where you store them, you&#8217;ll need these items for your new home:</p>
<ul>
<li>Medical Supplies: Fever reducers, band-aids, and a first aid kit will get you started.</li>
<li>Cleaning Supplies: Purchase glass cleaner, a multi-purpose surface cleaner, a bleach-based cleaner, toilet cleaner, and a tub cleaner.</li>
<li>Tools: A basic toolset with a hammer, screwdrivers, and wire cutters will be necessary to complete routine household repairs.</li>
<li>Basics: Light bulbs, a mop, a broom, a dustpan, and paper towels are all household items you&#8217;ll need right away.</li>
<li>Extension Cords: They&#8217;re easy to forget but hard to live without. You&#8217;ll probably want at least two extension cords.</li>
<li>Surge Protectors: Your expensive electronics will thank you.</li>
<li>Router and Modem: Today&#8217;s home essentials include the internet.</li>
<li>Ethernet Cables: Like extension cords, these are good to have around.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Things to Buy for a New House: The Kitchen</h3>
<p>Your kitchen houses everything it takes to feed you and your family. It might require the biggest checklist of any room in your new home. Besides, you&#8217;ll likely want items that match <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/kitchen-colors/">your new kitchen color schemes</a>.</p>
<h4>Tableware</h4>
<ul>
<li>Silverware: You can&#8217;t eat with those plastic hybrid sporks for long. Purchase a set of tableware that suits the size of your family.</li>
<li>Dishes: Getting these in a complete set will help you avoid forgetting any essentials.</li>
</ul>
<h4>Cooking Supplies</h4>
<ul>
<li>Kitchen Knives: Consider starting with a chef&#8217;s knife, a bread knife, and a paring knife.</li>
<li>Cooking Tools/Utensils: Start with the basics, including tongs, spatula, ladles, whisk, and a utensil holder to keep everything tidy.</li>
<li>Pots and Pans: Essentials here require you to shop by size and type. Consider sizes that are useful for a variety of dishes like a 12-inch skillet, a 3-quart saucepot, a large stockpot, and a 1-quart saucepot.</li>
<li>Bakeware: Consider a starter set of bakeware that includes a 9&#215;13 baking pan, 2 8 inch round pans, and a cookie sheet.</li>
<li>Measuring Cups and Spoons: Glass measuring cups are inexpensive and will last forever if you don&#8217;t drop them. Add a cheap set of plastic measuring cups and spoons to the mix, and you&#8217;re ready for all your favorite recipes.</li>
</ul>
<h4>Additional Kitchen Supplies</h4>
<ul>
<li>Storage Containers: You don&#8217;t have to buy Tupperware, but you do need a set of sealable storage containers.</li>
<li>Small Appliances: You won&#8217;t be at home without the things you use every day, like a coffee maker, blender, toaster, and microwave.</li>
<li>Can Opener: Even if you have an automatic can opener sitting on the counter, purchase a cheap handheld one for emergencies.</li>
<li>Kitchen Essentials: The things that every kitchen has but are easy to forget fall into this category. Purchase ice trays, plastic wrap and tin foil, oven mitts, sponges, dishcloths, dish towels and dish soap, a drying rack, a trash bin, a cutting board, and mixing bowls.</li>
<li>Pantry and Refrigerator Staples: Your first trip to the grocery store will be an experience you won&#8217;t soon forget. Get ahead by purchasing items like flour, sugar, ketchup, mustard, coffee, and anything else you know you&#8217;ll need on a regular basis.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip About Things to Buy for a New House:</h4>
<p>Purchasing dishes and silverware in sets can save money. Make sure you have enough by purchasing a set large enough to include two to four guests.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Things to Buy for a New House: The Living Room</h3>
<p>The room where you&#8217;ll spend the most time requires a few necessities to make it comfortable.</p>
<ul>
<li>Seating: You&#8217;ve probably considered some great furniture for your new home and maybe even included the cost in your loan. You&#8217;ll want to have a couch, chairs, and maybe a loveseat.</li>
<li>Lighting: Older homes may not have ceiling lights, so you may need some lamps.</li>
<li>Shelving and Wall Decor: At the very least, you&#8217;ll want a TV stand and a bookshelf. Floating shelves make a great option for functional decorating.</li>
<li>Television: Your new home will still need entertainment.</li>
<li>Coffee Table and End Tables: Often, you can save money by purchasing these items in a set.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Things to Buy for a New House: Each Bedroom</h3>
<p>Each bedroom will need to be equipped with furniture and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/bedroom-organization/">other necessities to keep things tidy and comfortable</a>.</p>
<ul>
<li>Bed Frame: You know you need a bed, but the frame can be surprisingly easy to overlook when you&#8217;re swooning over mattress choices.</li>
<li>Mattress: Choose mattresses that will fit nicely in your new bedrooms and will last for several years.</li>
<li>Box Springs: Sometimes, you can purchase these in a set with the mattress. If not, ask the furniture store clerk for assistance in getting a perfect match.</li>
<li>Bedding: You&#8217;ll need sheets, pillowcases, and comforters in each bedroom. If kids are involved, let them choose their favorite colors and designs.</li>
<li>Dressers: Most homes don&#8217;t have built-in dressers. You&#8217;ll have to purchase these for each bedroom before the move.</li>
<li>Curtains: Bedrooms are the rooms that should have window treatments and window coverings right away.</li>
<li>Alarm Clock: Don’t start mornings in your new home with a ritual of being late!</li>
<li>Hangers: Your new closets need accessories to keep your clothes neatly in place.</li>
<li>Shoe Rack: Keep your new bedroom clean with a tidy place for your shoe collection.</li>
<li>Additional Storage: Bins, shelves, space saver bags, drawer organizers will help you keep your possessions neatly tucked away.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Things to Buy for a New House: Each Bathroom</h3>
<p>Your bathroom is full of essential items that you need to use every day.</p>
<ul>
<li>Toilet Paper: This should be at the top of your list of things to buy for a new house.</li>
<li>Shower Curtain, Rod, and Rings: Even if you&#8217;re patting yourself on the back for remembering to buy new shower curtain liners, those essential rods and rings are easy to overlook.</li>
<li>Shower Caddy: While you&#8217;re picking this up, you might as well grab the toiletries you need to go in it.</li>
<li>Toothbrush Holder: Consider this the caddy for your sink. Grab some toothbrushes for every member of your home and your favorite toothpaste while you&#8217;re at it.</li>
<li>Bath Mat: You don&#8217;t want to drip all over your new floor, and you probably need a cute matching bathroom set, anyway.</li>
<li>Toilet Brush: You&#8217;ll need it sooner than you want to think about.</li>
<li>Plunger: This is another item that should top new home checklists.</li>
<li>Trash Can: You&#8217;ll need a few of these, so grab one for the kitchen and bedrooms while you&#8217;re at it. Also, grab some trash bags.</li>
<li>Towels and Wash Cloths: Buying these in sets can help you save.</li>
<li>Drain Snake: You can&#8217;t plan for unexpected emergencies, so it&#8217;s best to have this tool on hand.</li>
<li>Toilet Seat: You may want a new cover for each of your new toilets.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Things to Buy for a New House: The Entryway</h3>
<p>This often overlooked area has an important job of corralling items that would otherwise be cluttering your new home. Outfit your entryway with these essentials:</p>
<ul>
<li>Coat Rack: Avoid draping coats and hats on your new furniture.</li>
<li>Key Hooks: If you get used to using this right away, you might never lose your keys in your new home.</li>
<li>Mail Organizer: Every flat surface in your new home will thank you.</li>
<li>Welcome Mat: You want your guests to feel welcome and to wipe their feet.</li>
<li>Shoe Tray: Even if you don&#8217;t always take your shoes off when you enter your home, you&#8217;ll need a place to stow the drippy muddy ones.</li>
</ul>
<p>Preparing a list of all the new things to buy for a new house can be exhausting, but it will be worth it when your new house is furnished with all the new items you need. Using a new home checklist will help you get ahead and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/interior-designing-all-you-need-to-know-to-become-an-expert/">enjoy furnishing and decorating your new home</a> when you arrive.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/things-to-buy-for-a-new-house-new-home-checklist-for-first-time-homebuyers/">Things to Buy for a New House &#038; New Home Checklist for First-Time Homebuyers</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Store Batteries: A Comprehensive Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-batteries-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-batteries-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 11 Feb 2021 19:00:53 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Organization]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to store]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Life Hacks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Personal Organization]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7063</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Proper battery storage is critical for keeping your batteries performing at peak efficiency. Choosing to store batteries the right way can make a big difference in reducing corrosion, preventing leakage, and avoiding self-discharge. With these tips, your batteries will always be ready for a long moving day, emergencies, and keeping your electronics powered. Tips for [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-batteries-guide/">How to Store Batteries: A Comprehensive Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Proper battery storage is critical for keeping your batteries performing at peak efficiency. Choosing to store batteries the right way can make a big difference in reducing corrosion, preventing leakage, and avoiding self-discharge. With these tips, your batteries will always be ready for <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-to-another-county/">a long moving day</a>, emergencies, and keeping your electronics powered.</p>
<h2>Tips for Storing Batteries</h2>
<p>Follow these tips for how to store your batteries to protect both them and your devices — and to help increase your overall organization.</p>
<h3>Tip #1: Store Batteries at Room Temperature</h3>
<p>Room temperature battery storage can help extend the batteries’ lifespan. As you plan how to store batteries, make sure you take temperature into consideration. Years ago, popular wisdom suggested that you should store batteries in the fridge or freezer to expand their lifespan. More recent research, however, indicates that batteries do best in a cool, but not cold, dry location. If you&#8217;re planning to place batteries in a storage facility, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/climate-controlled-storage">consider a climate-controlled storage option</a>. This will help keep your batteries safer. Extreme temperatures, including both high and low temperatures, can significantly affect overall battery life.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Store Batteries:</h4>
<p>For more robust batteries <a href="https://www.caranddriver.com/features/a26873586/car-battery-disconnecting/#sidepanel" target="_blank">like car batteries</a>, opt for climate-controlled storage instead of an outdoor shed.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Tip #2: Remove the Batteries From Your Devices</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7065" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Person-taking-old-batteries-out-of-a-remote.jpg" alt="Person taking old batteries out of a remote" width="1195" height="878" /></p>
<p>When planning how to store batteries, always remove them from your devices. If you&#8217;re storing rechargeable batteries, you should not store them in the battery charger, either. Instead, place them in the original container or in a plastic box, away from any metal objects. Ideally, you should store lithium-ion batteries at around 30%-50% capacity. Try not to store li-ion batteries with a full charge whenever possible, as this could decrease their shelf life.</p>
<h3>Tip #3: Store One-Time Use Batteries in Their Original Packaging If You Can</h3>
<p>When storing batteries, you’ll want to store single-use batteries in their original packaging. These containers are specifically designed to keep the batteries&#8217; positive and negative ends from coming into contact with one another. If you buy new batteries, keep those batteries in their original packaging for as long as possible.</p>
<p>If you don&#8217;t have the original packaging as you plan out your battery storage, find a small box or container just for battery storage. Store batteries with all the positive ends pointing in the same direction. Do not simply throw all of your batteries into a plastic bag.</p>
<h3>Tip #4: Do Not Store New Batteries With Old Batteries</h3>
<p>Most of the time, you will remove old batteries from the device they&#8217;re in and toss them when you&#8217;re done with them. Sometimes, however, you may take those old batteries out before they&#8217;ve completely lived their lives. Maybe you no longer want to use a specific device. Perhaps you know that you need to store a specific device long-term, and you do not want to store the batteries with it.</p>
<p>When you take those old batteries out of the device and plan how to store the batteries, place them in their own location. Do not store them with new batteries. Storing different types of batteries together can lead to grabbing one new battery and one old battery from the box, which can decrease charge or lower battery life.</p>
<h3>Tip #5: Keep Batteries of the Same Type Together</h3>
<p>You may have AA batteries, AAA batteries, D batteries, C batteries, 9 volts, and a host of others. You may also have batteries designed for specific appliances or a spare car battery in case your car goes dead over the course of the winter. So you need to know how to store batteries safely when you have multiple types on hand.</p>
<p>But as you consider how to store batteries of different types, try to store batteries of the same type together, rather than storing different types of batteries in one place. Do not store AA batteries with C or D batteries. Mixing them together and risking cross-contact could destroy battery life. It could also lead to increased corrosion or leakage, which could cause problems for your device. You may need more than one battery storage box, especially if you have multiple types of batteries that can no longer be stored in their original packaging.</p>
<h3>Tip #6: Store Batteries Out of Reach of Children</h3>
<p>If you have small children in your home, the decision about how to store batteries can become even more difficult. Small children might try to swallow batteries, especially small button batteries and lithium-ion batteries. Unfortunately, these batteries can pose a serious danger to children when swallowed. Batteries can burn through the esophagus, leaving children with severe or even lifelong damage.</p>
<p>If you have <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-improvements-before-baby-arrives/">infants or small children at home</a>, make sure all small button batteries are fully secured in the devices that use them. Look for screw doors. Make sure each one has a well-fitted screw that will help hold the battery door in place. If you have devices that use those batteries but which will allow easy access to the battery, consider storing those devices out of reach, too. Try storing batteries in high cabinets or keeping them behind a locked door.</p>
<h3>Tip #7: Make Sure Your Batteries Are Stored in a Dry Place</h3>
<p>Dampness can significantly impact battery life, especially if the batteries remain in that setting for an extended period of time. Even high humidity can decrease your charge level more rapidly, decreasing battery life and leaving you without the means to keep your devices running.<br />
Store batteries away from areas that often get wet or where high humidity is normal. For example, you might not want to store your batteries in the bathroom or under the kitchen sink, where moisture can quickly end up in your storage area.</p>
<h3>Tip #8: Always Store Batteries in Some Type of Container</h3>
<p>When you consider how to store your batteries, make sure that you do not simply allow loose batteries to roll around in a drawer. Ideally, you want to store your batteries in a vapor-proof container, where they will be protected from moisture. One of the most important facets of how to store your batteries, however, is ensuring that they&#8217;re protected. You don&#8217;t want them to roll up against a jar of paper clips or other metal objects. That could inadvertently create a circuit and decrease your batteries&#8217; lifespan.</p>
<h3>Tip #9: Recycle Your Old Batteries</h3>
<p>Non-rechargeable batteries, which have only a single use, should be removed from devices once they have used up their charge. If you leave them in the device, even if they no longer have a charge, they can corrode or suffer discharge. This can quickly damage your devices. Over time, even rechargeable batteries may no longer hold their charge as well as they did in the beginning.</p>
<p>Once your batteries reach this point, recycle them. Do not simply throw them away. Your local cell phone store may offer a trade-in option for your phone battery. If you replace your car battery, you may need to pay a core charge if you don&#8217;t recycle the old one. Many stores will return the core charge fee once you return an old battery.</p>
<p>For AA batteries, AAA batteries, and other standard size batteries, you may want to wait until local hazardous materials recycling dates or check with local home improvement stores. Home Depot, for example, offers a battery recycling program that will put your old batteries to good use.</p>
<p>If you&#8217;re unsure how to store batteries in your home or how to make the most of your existing space, try looking into additional storage tips or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-organization-guide/">overall home organization tips</a>. These resources can help give you a better understanding of how to safely store all types of items in your home.</p>
<h2>Additional Cleaning and Organizing Resources:</h2>
<ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-car-seats-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean Car Seats</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-mattress-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean a Mattress</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-fish-tank/">How to Clean a Fish Tank</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/clean-wood-furniture/">How to Clean Wood Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/outdoor-furniture-cleaning/">How to Clean your Outdoor Patio and Lawn Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/spring-cleaning-list/">Spring Cleaning List</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-batteries-guide/">How to Store Batteries: A Comprehensive Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Use Ratchet Straps</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-use-ratchet-straps/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-use-ratchet-straps/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 09 Feb 2021 19:00:57 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to use tools]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving guide]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7059</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Ratchet straps, also known as tie-down straps, make cargo control in a truck bed or other large vehicle much easier. They&#8217;re one of the best tools in your arsenal when managing a DIY move or moving possessions to storage. However, to transport your cargo safely and effectively, you must know how to use ratchet straps [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-use-ratchet-straps/">How to Use Ratchet Straps</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Ratchet straps, also known as tie-down straps, make cargo control in a truck bed or other large vehicle much easier. They&#8217;re one of the best tools in your arsenal when <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/">managing a DIY move</a> or moving possessions to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">storage</a>. However, to transport your cargo safely and effectively, you must know how to use ratchet straps effectively.</p>
<h2>What Are Ratchet Straps?</h2>
<p>Ratchet tie-down straps are webbings outfitted with hardware that can be used to tighten the webbing and hold cargo firmly in place in a vehicle. They come in a wide range of end fittings and ratchet styles, but they all work together in much the same way. You connect two straps, usually made of high-quality polyester webbing material, through a ratchet assembly. The ratchet allows you to pass the webbing, or straps, through the hardware to get a tighter, firmer fit as you secure cargo.</p>
<p>These are commonly used to transport large items in a truck bed, but they can also be used to secure cargo on a flatbed or other, smaller vehicle. Whether you&#8217;re trying to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">move a mattress</a> on your own or you have a truck filled with items as you manage a major move, tie-down straps can increase safety during your journey.</p>
<h2>How to Use Ratchet Straps</h2>
<p>Follow these steps to learn how to use ratchet straps or tie-down straps effectively.</p>
<h3>Step One: Locate the instructions for your tie-down straps to learn how to use your specific ratchet straps.</h3>
<p>Some straps have unique configurations. You may want to check the instructions to be sure that yours are set up properly as you learn how to use ratchet straps for the first time. You should also check the straps&#8217; working load limit and break strength.</p>
<p>Does the weight of your cargo exceed the weight offered by your straps? If so, then you may want to choose different straps for your load. Each component, from the webbing to the end fittings, has its own break strength (the maximum amount of weight it can stand before breaking). If you exceed the limit of the weakest piece, your ratchet straps may break during transport, causing damage to your items or even potentially causing an accident.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Use Ratchet Straps:</h4>
<p>In general, the <a href="https://www.fieldandstream.com/three-factors-in-choosing-ratchet-strap-tie-down/" target="_blank">working load limit is 1/3 of the break strength of the weakest component</a> in your strap.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Step Two: Wrap the tie-down straps around your cargo.</h3>
<p>This is one of the most important facets of how to use ratchet straps properly. Secure it loosely at either end using the attached s-hooks. Make sure that the strap is not twisted as you place it around your cargo. Most trucks will have fasteners along the bed to provide a place to hook your tie-down straps. You may also find fasteners on your roof rack or around a flatbed, depending on what you&#8217;re transporting. Make sure that the end fasteners are secured firmly in a location that will not break during transport.</p>
<h3>Step Three: Open the ratchet.</h3>
<p>This will give you access to the axle, also known as the take-up spool. You may need to use the release handle on top of the ratchet to open it. As you figure out how to use tie-down straps, you may need to experiment with the ratchet configuration.</p>
<h3>Step Four: Feed the strap into the ratchet if you&#8217;re putting together your straps for the first time.</h3>
<p>The strap should go into the mandrel, or the slot located at the bottom of the ratchet. You may want to refer back to your instructions for the exact configuration if you&#8217;re figuring out how to use ratchet straps and putting your straps together for the first time.</p>
<h3>Step Five: Pull the strap until taut.</h3>
<p>You don&#8217;t need to leave a great deal of slack in the strap as you feed it through the mandrel. However, you do not have to worry about fully tightening the strap during this process. That&#8217;s what the ratchet is for!</p>
<h3>Step Six: Tighten the ratchet straps.</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7061" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Person-tightening-ratchet-straps-after-theyve-been-secured.jpg" alt="Person tightening ratchet straps after they've been secured" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Make sure the strap is flat. Also, securely place it around the cargo before you start tightening the ratchet. Check to make sure that your cargo is located at the ideal point in your vehicle, where it won&#8217;t shift around during transport. If you cannot fully secure your cargo, you may need more than one set of straps, or you may need to use other strategies to secure your cargo.</p>
<p>Then, move the ratchet lever in a pumping motion to tighten the straps further around the cargo.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Use Ratchet Straps:</h4>
<p>You do not need to over-tighten your ratchet straps! Remember, your goal is just to keep your cargo stable during transport, so make sure you do not try to tighten them excessively. This could make the process more difficult.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Step Seven: Lock the ratchet into the closed position.</h3>
<p>Check to make sure that your ratchet cannot simply pull loose. If you have a great deal of slack in your straps or you discover that the cargo can move more easily than anticipated, you may need to check the tension in your straps and re-tighten as needed.</p>
<h3>Step Eight: Tie down the loose ends of the straps, if needed.</h3>
<p>Depending on where you&#8217;re transporting your goods, you may want to tie down the loose ends of the straps to ensure that they do not flap around and cause a distraction during transport. You can tie them down to the fasteners on your vehicle or tuck them into themselves. If the ends are long enough, then you can even tie them up to keep them out of the way.</p>
<h3>Step Nine: Transport your items.</h3>
<p>With additional cargo in your vehicle, you may need to drive more slowly and carefully than usual. Make sure to check your vehicle&#8217;s maximum load limit. Do not overload your vehicle.</p>
<p>If you will be transporting your vehicle over a long distance, make sure you check your tie-down straps periodically to ensure that they are still in place and still tight. If needed, tighten the straps again, making sure that the ratchet is locked in the closed position before resuming transport.</p>
<h2>How Do I Loosen a Ratchet Strap?</h2>
<p>Once you arrive at your destination, you&#8217;ll need to take the tie-down straps back off of your cargo and remove them from your vehicle. This means that not only do you need to know how to use ratchet straps, but you also need to know how to loosen them again.</p>
<h3>Step One: Pull and hold the release tab.</h3>
<p>The release tab, also known as the release lever, will help release pressure on the strap. Open the ratchet fully while pressing the lever, which will allow the strap to move more freely.</p>
<h3>Step Two: Pull the strap loose.</h3>
<p>Depending on how you prefer to store your ratchet straps and what you&#8217;re transporting, you may want to either pull the strap completely free of the ratchet device, or you may want to simply loosen it enough that you can remove the s-hooks from the fasteners on your vehicle.</p>
<h3>Step Three: Remove the ratchet straps from the vehicle and cargo.</h3>
<p>Make sure to exercise caution when removing the ratchet straps from your cargo. If you&#8217;ve been relying on the straps to hold your cargo in place, it could fall off once you&#8217;re no longer holding it in place. They&#8217;re also more likely to fall if:</p>
<ul>
<li>You&#8217;ve placed your item on a roof rack rather than in the bed of a truck.</li>
<li>You have several precariously-balanced items loaded into the truck bed all at the same time.</li>
</ul>
<p>If you need to leave the straps in place, make sure you&#8217;re aware of where they are. Shift them to a location where you will be unlikely to trip over them while unloading cargo. If you do leave your ratchet straps loosely tied, you may want to notify anyone else who is helping you move your cargo about the potential trip hazard.</p>
<h3>Step Four: Close and lock the ratchet buckle.</h3>
<p>Do not leave the ratchet buckle open when the strap is not in use. Leaving the buckle open can cause the heavy-duty straps to wear down faster, decreasing their overall lifespan and the security of your cargo.</p>
<h2>How Should I Store Ratchet Straps When I&#8217;m Not Using Them?</h2>
<p>Ratchet straps need to be stored in a dry location, out of direct sunlight. That means not tossing the straps straight into a truck bed and leaving them there until the next time you use them! Some safer storage options may include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Tucking them in the cab of the truck</li>
<li>Keeping them in a toolbox on the back of the truck</li>
<li>Leaving them in storage until the next time you need them</li>
<li>Keeping them hung up in the garage or in a toolbox where you can easily access them if needed</li>
</ul>
<p>Ratchet straps are a valuable tool in the arsenal of anyone who needs to move heavy-duty cargo. Whether you&#8217;re moving an ATV, a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">couch</a>, or a washing machine, the high-quality polyester webbing of your ratchet straps, combined with the ratcheting function of the winch, makes it easier for you to secure your cargo and ensure a safe move. Do not move heavy or wobbly cargo without strapping it in place, since it can cause serious accidents if it tumbles from your vehicle.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-use-ratchet-straps/">How to Use Ratchet Straps</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>The Neighbor Next 25: The 25 Most Up-and-Coming Cities in America</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/25-up-and-coming-cities-in-america/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/25-up-and-coming-cities-in-america/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 09 Feb 2021 15:00:46 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7098</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>These 25 cities may not be the best places to live right now, but we think they will be soon. These are the Neighbor Next 25.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/25-up-and-coming-cities-in-america/">The Neighbor Next 25: The 25 Most Up-and-Coming Cities in America</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>There are a lot of sites that will tell you which U.S. cities are the best places to live right now.</p>
<p>But we wanted to go a step further than that. We wanted to get ahead of the curve.</p>
<p>We didn’t want to know the 25 best cities to live in <em>right now</em>. We wanted to know the <em>Next 25</em>.</p>
<p><span id="more-7098"></span></p>
<p>Which cities are right on the cusp of becoming the best places to live? Or, which cities are already great, but continuing to get bigger and better?</p>
<p>That’s how the Neighbor Next 25 was born.</p>
<p>We’re confident in saying that these 25 cities are the <em>most</em> up-and-coming places to live in the U.S. We studied a number of factors that show which cities are growing and improving (and weathering the ongoing coronavirus pandemic without major economic turmoil) and we landed on these 25. If you’re looking for the “next big thing” in places to live, look no further.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7110 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Neighbor-Next-25_Master-List.png" alt="The Neighbor Next 25: The 25 Most Up-and-Coming Cities in America" width="1789" height="2958" /></p>
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>Related: </strong><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/">The 25 Most Neighborly Cities in America</a></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<h2>These are the Next 25 Up-and-Coming American Cities</h2>
<p>Let&#8217;s dive into the cities that made the 2021 Neighbor Next 25!</p>
<p>The No.1 most up-and-coming U.S. city is&#8230;</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7100 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/01-Salisbury.png" alt="Salisbury, MD" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3>1. Salisbury, MD</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>49/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>Unranked in 2013 to 17th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+1.1%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+10.9%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+24.9%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.6 homes per resident</p>
<p>Salisbury, Maryland, the largest city in the state&#8217;s Eastern Shore region, is our No. 1 up-and-coming city!</p>
<p>Salisbury got a major boost from its well-being index scores — it didn’t even make the top 200 cities in 2013, but was ranked 17th just five years later. That’s a city that’s investing in the well-being of its residents at a high rate.</p>
<p>While Salisbury, like most of the U.S., saw an increase in unemployment in 2020, it was just over 1%, much less than the national increase of more than 6%. We think that indicates that Salisbury is economically stable and is handling the global pandemic with more resiliency than the average city.</p>
<p>It’s clear that people are already catching on — Salisbury has seen a significant boost in its population in recent years. But new housing builds are outpacing population growth, which means housing is still affordable here for new and existing residents alike.</p>
<p>Salisbury provides arts, museums, a regional airport, and a number of surrounding state forests and wildlife areas where residents can pursue virtually limitless recreational activities. Norfolk, VA, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia are all accessible within a day’s drive or train journey, which puts big-city amenities well within reach of this relatively small metro area.</p>
<p>Those are just some of the reasons Salisbury, MD has much to offer new residents, and deserves its top spot on the Neighbor Next 25.</p>
<p><strong><br />
<img class="aligncenter wp-image-7101 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/02-Cape-Coral.png" alt="Cape Coral, FL" width="1789" height="482" /></strong></p>
<h3>2. Cape Coral, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>47/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>149th in 2013 to 6th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.9%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+24.2%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+27%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<p>The Gulf city of Cape Coral, FL, has a lot to offer those who might want to call it home in the future.</p>
<p>What landed it solidly in the No. 2 spot in our rankings was the fact that its spot on the Well-Being Index increased 143 places, to land it in the top 10 cities for well-being in 2018.</p>
<p>In addition to that, Cape Coral is growing. It saw nearly a 25% population increase in the last decade, but new housing construction is keeping pace, with a 27% increase in permits filed in the last year, which should help ensure that housing in the city stays affordable.</p>
<p>In addition to warm and sunny weather almost year-round, Cape Coral is known for its beaches, canals, golf courses, and family entertainment.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7102 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/03-Myrtle-Beach.png" alt="Myrtle Beach, SC" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3> 3. Myrtle Beach, SC</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>36/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>164th in 2013 to 36th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.4%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+31.3%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+14.8%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.6 homes per resident</p>
<p>Myrtle Beach is one of the less diverse cities in our rankings, but its increase in the Well-Being Index made up for that — it moved from 164th in 2018 to just outside of the top third of healthy cities five years later.</p>
<p>People are clearly catching on — Myrtle Beach has seen more than a 30% increase in its population since 2010. While housing growth is solid at a nearly 15%over the last year, this is a city that’s growing in people faster than it’s growing in residences, so you might expect the cost of living here to increase somewhat in the coming years.<strong> </strong></p>
<p>Still, Myrtle Beach’s sunny weather, beaches and boardwalks, golf courses, amusement parks and more make it a destination we think is only going to increase in popularity, whether you’re single or moving with a family.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7103 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/04-Jacksonville.png" alt="Jacksonville, FL" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3>4. Jacksonville, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>54/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>159th in 2013 to 48th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.5%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+15.6%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+4.1%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<p>Coming in at No. 4 is Jacksonville, another sunny and warm city with a lot of diversity and a healthy population, according to its top 50 spot in the most recent Well-Being Index.</p>
<p>One note to make about Jacksonville is that its population growth is far outpacing its housing growth, which may increase the city’s cost of living.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7104 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/05-Chattanooga.png" alt="Chattanooga, TN-GA" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3>5. Chattanooga, TN-GA</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>36/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>179th in 2013 to 40th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+1.3%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+6.8%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+1.5%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<p>Chattanooga rounds out our top 5. Though it’s not the most diverse city on our list by any means, Chattanooga showed huge gains in its residents’ well-being over five years.</p>
<p>Plus, while the national unemployment rate grew by around 6 percent in 2020, Chattanooga saw just a 1.3% increase for its own residents. This is a city full of healthy, happy people with a resilient economy. That makes it well worth keeping an eye on.</p>
<h3>6. Jackson, MS</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>54/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>167th in 2013 to 72nd in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+0.9%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+1.1%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+22.6%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<p>Overall, Jackson ranked fairly high in diversity and well-being. What’s really worth watching in this city, though, is that new housing is growing far faster than the population. That&#8217;s a likely indication that Jackson is going to be an extremely affordable place to live for years to come.</p>
<h3>7. Ocala, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>46/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>121st in 2013 to 27th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.6%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+10.3%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+62.2%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<p>Ocala’s diversity and unemployment are pretty middle-of-the-road, though the city did see big gains in its Well-Being Index. What really sets this spot apart from others on the list is that new housing construction is far outpacing population growth. Ready to enjoy Florida weather with a low cost of living? Ocala may just be the place to do it.</p>
<h3>8. Riverside, CA</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>71/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>129th in 2013 to 65th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+4.2%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+9.6%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+3%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.3 homes per resident</p>
<p>Riverside is one of the most diverse cities to make our list. That means, for anyone looking for a community with a wealth of cultures, food, arts, and music, Riverside is likely to be a good pick.</p>
<p>Moving to Riverside won’t likely protect you from California cost of living, though — new housing permits increased by less than a third of the city’s population growth.</p>
<h3>9. Augusta, GA</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>57/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>141st in 2013 to 76th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+1.9%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+7.5%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+8.6%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<p>Augusta is a pretty diverse city, and it saw solid well-being improvement in five years. But what lands it within the top 10 up-and-coming cities is that unemployment there increased by less than 2% in 2020 — well below the national average. Plus, Augusta is seeing steady population growth, with steady growth in new residential permits to match.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7106 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/10-Port-St-Lucie.png" alt="Port St. Lucie, FL" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3>10. Port St. Lucie, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>37/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>105th in 2013 to 11th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.4%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+15.1%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+29.5%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<p>Port St. Lucie is one of the less diverse cities in our rankings. But its well-being improvement took it from outside of the top 100 cities in 2013, to <em>almost</em> in the top 10 in 2018. On top of that, Port St. Lucie has seen astronomical population growth in the last decade, but to keep pace with all the people who seem to be moving there, new housing permits increased by nearly 30% in the last year.</p>
<h3>11. Asheville, NC</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>26/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>140th in 2013 to 10th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+3%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+8.8%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+18.6%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<h3>12. Salinas, CA</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>68/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>34th in 2013 to 2nd in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+3%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+4.2%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+83.9%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.3 homes per resident</p>
<h3>13. Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>59/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>184th in 2013 to 107th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+6.5%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+0.9%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+86.6%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<h3>14. Birmingham-Hoover, AL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>52/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>145th in 2013 to 80th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+1.6%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+2.7%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+31%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7107 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/15-Santa-Maria-Barbara.png" alt="Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3>15. Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>79/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>41st in 2013 to 12th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.6%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+5.3%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>-43.3%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<h3>16. Lakeland-Winter Haven, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>57/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>138th in 2013 to 91st in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+4.1%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+20%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+11.7%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<h3>17. Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>55/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>152nd in 2013 to 98th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.9%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+14.6%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>-14.3%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<h3>18. Sioux Falls, SD</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>57/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>Not ranked in 2013 or 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+0.1%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+17.1%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+79.9%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<h3>19. Santa Fe, NM</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>80/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>Not ranked in 2013 or 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+3.1%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+4%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+5.2%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7108 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/20-Modesto.png" alt="Modesto, CA" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3>20. Modesto, CA</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>64/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>151st in 2013 to 124th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+3%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+6.9%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+60%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.3 homes per resident</p>
<h3>21. North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>37/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>77th in 2013 to 9th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.4%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+19%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>-1%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<h3>22. Montgomery, AL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>57/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>119th in 2013 to 71st in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.7%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>-0.5%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+28%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<h3>23. Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>45/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>157th in 2013 to 90th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.1%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+2.7%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+26.7%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<h3>24. Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, FL</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>44/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>161st in 2013 to 110th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+2.9%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+13.2%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>+40%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.5 homes per resident</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7109 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/25-Fort-Wayne.png" alt="Fort Wayne, IN" width="1789" height="482" /></p>
<h3>25. Fort Wayne, IN</h3>
<p><strong>Diversity Score: </strong>41/100</p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement: </strong>153rd in 2013 to 79th in 2018</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment: </strong>+1.7%</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth: </strong>+6.2%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>-5.7%</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>0.4 homes per resident</p>
<h3>How we determined our city rankings</h3>
<p>We looked at a wide variety of factors, using data that mostly came from the U.S. Census Bureau.</p>
<p><strong>Diversity Score</strong>:<strong> </strong>There are <a href="https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2018/04/people-who-live-in-diverse-neighbourhoods-are-more-helpful-here-s-how-we-know" target="_blank">many studies that show</a> that diverse communities are healthier and happier. We used Census data and the <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/10/21/diversity-index-data-how-we-did-report/17432103/" target="_blank">USA TODAY Diversity Index</a> to give each of these cities a diversity score out of 100. This metric was given high weight in our final calculation.<strong> </strong></p>
<p><strong>Well-Being Improvement</strong>: We used <a href="https://wellbeingindex.sharecare.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/State-of-American-Well-Being-2014.pdf" target="_blank">Gallup’s State of American Well-Being reports,</a> which consider factors like physical health, emotional health, work environments, and healthy behaviors to determine the healthiest, happiest cities in the nation. For our rankings, we compared the cities’ well-being rankings in 2013 and 2018, and tracked how much resident well-being has improved over time. This metric was given high weight in our final calculation.</p>
<p><strong>Change in Unemployment</strong>: Using <a href="https://www.bls.gov/web/metro/laummtch.htm#laummtch.f.p" target="_blank">Bureau of Labor Statistics data</a>, we compared unemployment rates in November of 2019, and November of 2020. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, most cities saw an increase in unemployment in that time. However, those with smaller increases seemed to be more economically resilient. This metric was given medium weight in our final calculation.</p>
<p><strong>Population Growth</strong>: This ranking isn’t about which cities are best <em>right now</em>. So we looked at <a href="https://www.census.gov/data/datasets/time-series/demo/popest/2010s-total-cities-and-towns.html" target="_blank">Census data</a> to see which cities are actively growing and factored in their rate of growth from 2010 to 2019. This metric was given medium weight in our final calculation.</p>
<p><strong>Housing Permit Growth: </strong>Another metric that we felt indicated sustainable growth in a city was how many new residential building permits have been filed. We used <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/load-moving-truck-7-items-leave/" target="_blank">Census data</a> to compare permit numbers in 2019 and 2020, and factored in the rate of increase (or decrease) in new permits in the last year. This metric was given low weight in our final calculation.</p>
<p><strong>Housing Per Capita: </strong>And finally, we wanted to make sure that housing was keeping up with population growth (a major factor in whether housing remains affordable in a growing city). For this, we compared Census data on existing housing units and city populations to determine <a href="https://www.census.gov/acs/www/data/data-tables-and-tools/data-profiles/2019/" target="_blank">housing per capita</a> in each up-and-coming city. This metric was given low weight in our final calculation.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/25-up-and-coming-cities-in-america/">The Neighbor Next 25: The 25 Most Up-and-Coming Cities in America</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Security Deposit Return Process: The Ultimate Guide to Getting Your Money Back</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/security-deposit-return-process-the-ultimate-guide-to-getting-your-money-back/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/security-deposit-return-process-the-ultimate-guide-to-getting-your-money-back/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 04 Feb 2021 19:00:26 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[apartment]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[apartment living]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving checklist]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7050</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>When moving out, there&#8217;s a lot to remember, and sometimes, things get overlooked. The security deposit return often slips the mind of both the tenant and the landlord. All too often, both parties are unaware of the laws in their state, along with their own personal rights and responsibilities. This guide will walk you through [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/security-deposit-return-process-the-ultimate-guide-to-getting-your-money-back/">Security Deposit Return Process: The Ultimate Guide to Getting Your Money Back</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>When <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">moving out</a>, there&#8217;s a lot to remember, and sometimes, things get overlooked. The security deposit return often slips the mind of both the tenant and the landlord. All too often, both parties are unaware of the laws in their state, along with their own personal rights and responsibilities. This guide will walk you through the security deposit return process and increase the odds of getting your security deposit back.</p>
<h2>What Is a Security Deposit Return?</h2>
<p>When you move into a new rental unit, the landlord will usually ask for a security deposit as insurance in case of:</p>
<ul>
<li>Unpaid rent</li>
<li>Damage to the rental property that’s beyond normal wear and tear</li>
<li>The tenant otherwise failing to comply with the terms of the lease agreement</li>
</ul>
<p>A security deposit is usually equal to around one or two months&#8217; rent. A security deposit return is when your landlord gives your security deposit back after your tenancy officially ends. If there&#8217;s no damage to the unit and your rent is paid up, you can get the full security deposit back. If there is damage, however, you will only get the part of the deposit left over after covering those costs.</p>
<h2>Reasons for Not Getting a Full Security Deposit Return</h2>
<p>Every state has its own laws governing security deposit return procedures, as do some local jurisdictions. So what&#8217;s allowed will vary depending on where you live. While the security deposit laws in your state may have different specifications, the most common reasons for not getting your full security deposit back are:</p>
<ul>
<li>Early termination of the lease agreement</li>
<li>Unusual cleaning expenses</li>
<li>Unpaid rent</li>
<li>Unpaid utilities</li>
<li>Damage to the rental unit</li>
</ul>
<p>While those are the reasons most frequently given for withholding some portion of the security deposit, your state laws may differ. Let&#8217;s go over each one to provide a bit more context.</p>
<h3>Early Termination of the Lease Agreement</h3>
<p>If a tenant wants to leave before the end of the lease, the circumstances may let the landlord deduct the expenses related to this breach of the lease agreement from the tenant&#8217;s security deposit. Whether this is allowed will depend upon the landlord-tenant laws in that state and the lease terms.</p>
<h3>Unusual Cleaning Expenses</h3>
<p>Some cleaning expenses are expected when a tenant moves and are usually considered to be part of normal wear and tear. But suppose the conditions of the rental unit go beyond ordinary wear. In that case, the landlord can use part of the deposit to cover the cost and return the portion of the security deposit that&#8217;s left over.</p>
<h3>Unpaid Rent</h3>
<p>If the tenant has unpaid rent, that&#8217;s considered a breach of the rental agreement, and state laws usually let the landlord deduct that month&#8217;s rent from the deposit. If the tenant doesn&#8217;t give enough notice, or in some cases, written notice, before they move out, the landlord can often take the amount of the security deposit necessary to cover the rent they would have paid if proper notice was given.</p>
<h3>Unpaid Utilities</h3>
<p>If a renter has unpaid utilities that they were required to pay according to their written lease agreement, then the landlord may keep the portion of the security deposit needed to cover the cost.</p>
<h3>Damage to the Rental Unit</h3>
<p>If damage to the rental unit, beyond the normal wear and tear, is discovered during the move-out inspection, part of the deposit may be used to cover the cost of repairs. The landlord has to return the remainder of the tenant&#8217;s security deposit, usually within 30 days (<a href="https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/chart-deadline-returning-security-deposits-29018.html" target="_blank">depending on the state</a>).</p>
<h2>Security Deposit vs. Last Month&#8217;s Rent</h2>
<p>While the security deposit is held as collateral to cover damages or losses, the <a href="https://www.findlaw.com/realestate/landlord-tenant-law/the-difference-between-last-month-s-rent-and-a-security-deposit.html#:~:text=If%20the%20deposit%20is%20considered,used%20for%20by%20the%20landlord.&amp;text=Instead%20of%20calling%20that%20deposit,call%20it%20a%20security%20deposit." target="_blank">last month&#8217;s rent can only be used</a> to cover the last month of rent. If you didn&#8217;t pay an amount designated as last month&#8217;s rent but would like to use part of the deposit to cover it, you&#8217;ll need to get the landlord&#8217;s permission to do so.</p>
<h2>What Counts as Normal Wear and Tear?</h2>
<p>Normal wear and tear is any deterioration of the rental unit that can be reasonably predicted to occur from normal day-to-day living activities. Examples of this kind of ordinary wear include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Chipped or faded paint</li>
<li>Scuffed walls and floors</li>
<li>Discoloration of grout</li>
<li>A few stains on the carpet</li>
</ul>
<p>Damage is any abnormal issue that you wouldn&#8217;t naturally expect to occur over time that diminishes the rental property&#8217;s value or usefulness. Examples of damage might include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Large holes in the walls</li>
<li>Broken appliances due to neglect or purposeful action</li>
<li>Damaged carpets from pools of pet urine</li>
<li>Damaged doors or locks</li>
</ul>
<p>If landlords find this kind of damage when the tenant decides to move out, the tenant would be responsible for paying for the damage. The landlord can take the cost out of the security deposit.</p>
<h2>Effective Ways to Ensure Your Security Deposit Return</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7054" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Tenant-talking-about-his-security-deposit-return-to-his-landlord.jpg" alt="Tenant talking about his security deposit return to his landlord" width="1167" height="899" /></p>
<p>While there&#8217;s no way to guarantee you&#8217;ll get your security deposit back, there are things you can do to improve your chances. Here are some best practices for ensuring a smooth security deposit return.</p>
<h3>Before You Move In</h3>
<ul>
<li>Do a pre-move-in walk-through. Walk through the apartment with the landlord and document any existing damage.</li>
<li>Know your rights and state laws. Make sure you follow all laws regarding your responsibilities, and be aware of the landlord&#8217;s rights, as well.</li>
<li>Get everything in writing. Never assume a verbal agreement will hold up. Even if you like the landlord and believe they&#8217;ll do the right thing, it&#8217;s always best to protect yourself.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Security Deposit Return Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Use certified mail whenever possible and always maintain copies of anything you send them. Then you&#8217;ll have your copy of the letter and a return receipt to prove you sent it.</p></blockquote>
<p>Read your lease thoroughly before signing. Make sure you understand and agree with every point. If something is unclear, ask about it.</p>
<h3>While You Live in the Apartment</h3>
<ul>
<li>Clear all changes with the landlord. Get your landlord&#8217;s approval before you paint or put up shelves.</li>
<li>Maintain a friendly relationship. They may be more likely to work with you on issues if you&#8217;re friendly.</li>
<li>Report any damage immediately. Document it and find out how they want to handle the repairs.</li>
</ul>
<h3>When Moving Out</h3>
<ul>
<li>Give proper, written notice before moving out. Not giving notice might cost you an extra month&#8217;s rent and some goodwill.</li>
<li>Discuss expectations with your landlord. Ask them what they expect the condition of the apartment to be and what, if anything, they hold you responsible for fixing before you leave.</li>
<li>Document your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-spring-cleaning-decluttering-deep-cleaning-guide/">cleaning </a>and repairs. Take photos and videos of everything, before, during, and after you clean or repair anything.</li>
<li>Attend the move-out inspection. When the landlord inspects the final condition of the apartment, request to attend, and if possible, record their final walkthrough. Bring the photos you took during the move-in walk-through as proof of prior condition. If they find a problem that they want to hold part of the deposit to cover, offering to fix it yourself can often reduce costs.</li>
<li>Provide your forwarding <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">address</a>. Some states allow them to keep your deposit if they can&#8217;t locate you.</li>
</ul>
<h2>Commonly Asked Questions With Answers</h2>
<p>These frequently asked questions are the most common and most critical points to address:</p>
<h3>What are my rights regarding my security deposit?</h3>
<p>While every state is different, most states have some form of these guidelines regarding security deposits:</p>
<ul>
<li>It sometimes needs to be in a separate, or even interest-bearing, bank account.</li>
<li>Landlords can use security deposits only to cover unpaid rent or utilities and the cost of unusual cleaning or repairs that don&#8217;t fall under normal wear and tear.</li>
<li>Your landlord must (usually within 14-30 days of the end of tenancy) either give your security deposit back or provide an itemized list of damages, sometimes with an estimate.</li>
<li>They must return the unused remainder of the security deposit, typically within a similar timeframe.</li>
</ul>
<h3>What if I don&#8217;t get my security deposit back within that time?</h3>
<p>Suppose the landlord fails to comply with state laws regarding the return of the security deposit. In that case, you can take them to small claims court. If it&#8217;s found that they acted in bad faith, they may be required to pay triple the deposit plus any reasonable attorney&#8217;s fees. However, to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/save-money-fast/">save money</a> and time, try sending them a <a href="https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/demand-letter-settle-dispute-30105.html" target="_blank">demand letter</a> first.</p>
<h2>Final Thoughts About How to Ensure Your Security Deposit Return</h2>
<p>You must be diligent in finding out your local and state laws regarding security deposits to ensure you are treated fairly and meet your own responsibilities. There&#8217;s always a chance that something will go wrong. But following the guidelines listed above should give you the best possible chances of a smooth security deposit return process. Add these steps to your to-do list as you organize <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-and-packing-tips-the-ultimate-guide-to-relocating-your-home/">your plan for moving out</a>.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
      </a>
   </div>
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/security-deposit-return-process-the-ultimate-guide-to-getting-your-money-back/">Security Deposit Return Process: The Ultimate Guide to Getting Your Money Back</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>The Ultimate Guide to Moving Insurance</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-moving-insurance/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-moving-insurance/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 02 Feb 2021 19:00:14 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[insurance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving checklist]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[moving insurance]]></category>
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		<description><![CDATA[<p>Moving to a new place isn&#8217;t easy. There are items to wrap, boxes to pack, and things to put away before the moving trucks arrive. During the moving process, people spend hours trying to protect their items from breaking during transit. Unfortunately, even their best efforts may not provide enough protection from unexpected events. Moving [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-moving-insurance/">The Ultimate Guide to Moving Insurance</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Moving to a new place isn&#8217;t easy. There are items to wrap, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-and-packing-tips-the-ultimate-guide-to-relocating-your-home/">boxes to pack</a>, and things to put away before the moving trucks arrive. During the moving process, people spend hours trying to protect their items from breaking during transit. Unfortunately, even their best efforts may not provide enough protection from unexpected events. Moving insurance can reimburse customers for lost, stolen, or damaged items. It also allows them to replace or repair their valuables. Are you relocating to a new area soon? In our guide to moving insurance, you&#8217;ll learn more about what coverage is right for you.</p>
<h2>What Is Moving Insurance?</h2>
<p>Before a mover drops by to pack your valuables for your upcoming move, you&#8217;ll need adequate coverage for your household goods. Moving insurance protects your belongings while movers transport them to your new place. They protect your goods when they&#8217;re on the truck and sometimes when they&#8217;re in a temporary storage unit. It&#8217;s essential to purchase these policies because unexpected events can damage your valuables. For your peace of mind, get moving insurance to protect your goods during the transit process.</p>
<p><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">If you hire a professional mover</a>, you can ask them about moving insurance. These policies can reimburse you for valuables that are lost, damaged, or stolen during the relocation process.</p>
<p>You can only buy these policies through a professional mover. This insurance usually lasts 90 days and covers belongings stored at a moving company&#8217;s warehouse. Additionally, you can buy extensions to protect goods stored for longer periods. However, they don&#8217;t cover any items that you place into self-storage facilities.</p>
<p>Moving insurance isn&#8217;t a true insurance policy since movers aren&#8217;t licensed to sell them. Instead, they offer <a href="https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/Understanding_Valuation_and_Insurance_Options_Brochure_0.pdf" target="_blank">valuation coverage</a> that works in a similar way to insurance. It will reimburse you for covered losses listed within the contract, like damaged tables or chairs.</p>
<p>State insurance laws don&#8217;t apply to moving insurance policies, so customers need to read the contract before agreeing to the terms.</p>
<h2>Basic Moving Insurance Policies</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7044" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Man-comparing-moving-insurance-policies-to-find-the-right-one.jpg" alt="Man comparing moving insurance policies to find the right one" width="1365" height="768" /></p>
<p>According to the <a href="https://www.iii.org/article/getting-right-insurance-coverage-moving" target="_blank">Insurance Information Institute</a>, moving companies offer various valuation coverage options for their customers. The federal government mandates that interstate carriers provide released value and full value protection to their customers. Professional movers also offer separate liability coverage through third-party companies.</p>
<p>You&#8217;ll learn about each coverage in the following sections.</p>
<h3>What Is Released Value Protection?</h3>
<p><a href="https://www.consumeraffairs.com/movers/is-moving-insurance-worth-it.html" target="_blank">Released value protection</a>, or basic carrier liability, is the cheapest moving insurance with minimum coverage. Federal law requires interstate movers to offer this protection to customers during interstate moves.</p>
<p>Although you can receive released value at no additional cost beyond your moving charges, you&#8217;ll still have to ask for this coverage. Movers don&#8217;t automatically provide this type of coverage unless there is a contractual agreement in place.</p>
<p>This valuation option doesn&#8217;t provide full protection for your items. Your moving company won&#8217;t replace or repair household goods based on the estimated value of these items. Instead, they will only compensate you based on the weight of each belonging.</p>
<h4>How Released Value Protection Works</h4>
<p>They reimburse customers 60 cents per pound for each article. It doesn&#8217;t matter whether these items are family heirlooms, valuable collectibles, or furniture. This basic coverage will not provide enough money to replace any expensive items that movers may damage during a move.</p>
<p>For instance, you may decide to move to a loft within the city. You may hire a moving company that damages your $2,000 smart fridge when transporting it to your new place. Now, your appliance doesn&#8217;t cool down, even when it&#8217;s turned on.</p>
<p>If you selected released value protection coverage, the company wouldn&#8217;t fully reimburse you for your damaged fridge. Instead, they would use the weight to calculate the replacement costs. If your fridge weighs 600 pounds, you&#8217;ll only receive $360 to replace your fridge.</p>
<p>Your precious household goods cost more than the 60 cents per pound a moving company may offer. If you need better coverage for your valuables, you can select different options that provide better protection.</p>
<h3>What Is Full Value Protection Moving Insurance?</h3>
<p>A second option that provides increased coverage for your belongings is full value protection. Federal laws also mandate moving companies to offer this insurance to customers during <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-new-city/">interstate moves to a new city</a>.</p>
<p>Full value protection is not free, but it provides comprehensive full coverage. It means that the moving companies are liable for the full replacement of any valuables they transport to another long-distance location. These policies allow the consumer to determine what their items are worth per pound. This is stated liability, where you set the limits for your moving company&#8217;s liability. You&#8217;ll pay a premium based on the total amount of coverage for lost, destroyed, or damaged belongings.</p>
<p>Moving companies usually offer their own full value protection policies. They will cover the minimum value that you claim on your goods. Some state laws mandate the minimum level of coverage for household items. These amounts average between $4 and $6 per pound for household goods.</p>
<h4>How Full Value Protection Works</h4>
<p>How does your moving company calculate <a href="https://www.moving.com/tips/moving-insurance-coverage/" target="_blank">full value protection</a>? They multiply the total declared load by the minimum coverage value. For example, if your total declared load is 30,000 pounds, and your state&#8217;s minimum coverage is $4, then the moving company will value your goods at $120,000. This figure is the maximum amount you&#8217;ll receive if the insurance company loses or damages your entire shipment.</p>
<p>You may be responsible for other costs besides your premiums. Some full value protection policies require policyholders to meet a deductible. These are out-of-pocket costs you must pay before the moving insurance covers your items.</p>
<p>Although you must pay for full value protection, this coverage is well worth the price. Experts recommend buying this coverage because it will pay for the current market replacement value of damaged goods. It will also pay for repairs or replace your items with similar ones.</p>
<h4>How to File a Claim With Full Value Protection Moving Insurance</h4>
<p>When you file a claim under <a href="https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/protect-your-move/valuation-insurance" target="_blank">a full value protection policy</a>, your moving company will have three options to fulfill your claim.</p>
<ul>
<li>Repair your valuables</li>
<li>Replace your items with full-replacement value for your item with one of comparable value</li>
<li>Pay out full-replacement value for repair costs or the current market value of the item</li>
</ul>
<p>The moving company, not the customer, decides how they&#8217;ll make amends for the property. They can either repair the item or have it replaced with a similar item. Interstate shipments transported under the mover&#8217;s bill of lading are subject to an arbitration process. It occurs when you dispute the valuation of lost or damaged items.</p>
<p>For example, a professional moving company could damage your 400-pound washing machine during a move. Once you submit a claim and the company approves it, you may receive another washing machine at the current market value. If your washer was already beaten up, they won&#8217;t replace it with a brand-new washer. Instead, they&#8217;ll pay you the fair market value. You may have to pay a deductible of between $250 and $1,000 before the moving company will pay your claim.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Moving Insurance:</h4>
<p>Undergo the arbitration process if you dispute the moving company&#8217;s valuation of a damaged item.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Getting Full Value Protection for High-Value Items</h3>
<p>Moving companies can limit their liability for high-value items under these policies. The Surface Transportation Board refers to them as &#8220;items of extraordinary value&#8221; since they are worth more than $100 per pound. They include jewelry, antiques, valuable art, and other items.</p>
<p>Movers don&#8217;t have to reimburse you for items worth more than $100 per pound unless you listed them in its shipping contract. For instance, if they lose your diamond necklace during transport, they won&#8217;t have to cover it unless it&#8217;s listed on the shipping manifest.</p>
<p>Moving companies will allow you to buy more coverage for these items. The premiums will depend on the value of each item. Make sure you inventory your belongings and list everything valued at $100 or higher. Ask your moving company&#8217;s representative to include these items on the manifest.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Moving Insurance:</h4>
<p>Make sure the moving company lists your high-value items to ensure they&#8217;re covered.</p></blockquote>
<h3>What Is Separate Liability Insurance?</h3>
<p>You can ‌upgrade your coverage if your valuables have increased exposures and risks. If valuation insurance doesn&#8217;t provide enough insurance, you can consider separate liability. This coverage will provide extra protection for your items.</p>
<p>Separate liability is an optional, third-party cargo liability insurance regulated by states. You may buy this coverage through the moving company. The policy covers the insurance amount purchased minus the basic carrier liability amount that movers pay (usually 60 cents per pound).</p>
<p>Under federal law, the moving company must provide you with a copy of the insurance policy after you buy it. They must abide by this legal provision. If they break the law, the moving company is liable for all claims, losses, and damages attributed to their negligence.</p>
<p>Third-party insurers follow the regulations of the local states where they operate. You can&#8217;t enter an arbitration process if you dispute the value of an item listed on an estimated settlement.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Moving Insurance:</h4>
<p>Get a copy of your third-party moving Insurance policy after you buy it.</p></blockquote>
<h3>What Is Expanded Moving Insurance Coverage?</h3>
<p>If you expect your shipment to face increased risks during shipment, ‌consider upgrading your coverage.</p>
<p>There are several options available to customers. Some companies sell expanded valuations. You can buy declared value protection, and this coverage allows you to set a per-pound amount for your valuables.</p>
<p>For instance, you may determine that your household goods are worth $7 per pound. If your total shipment is 20,000 pounds, you have estimated your goods are worth $140,000. This amount is the maximum you would receive if your movers lost your entire shipment.</p>
<p>They would replace individual items, like clothes or appliances, with like-kind ones. The moving company would replace a five-year-old dryer with a similar model. Clothing would have little cash value, so they would replace it with similar items.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for Moving Insurance:</h4>
<p>Ask the moving company to provide a lump sum, or assessed value, for the shipment. It provides similar coverage, except the customer determines the shipment&#8217;s value instead of determining it by its weight.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Moving Insurance Doesn&#8217;t Cover Everything</h2>
<p>Although valuation coverage reimburses customers for damages, these policies don&#8217;t cover everything. There are several scenarios that valuation insurance will not cover.</p>
<ul>
<li>Self-packed items — Movers are not liable for items you packed yourself. Unless the box has significant damage, this coverage will not reimburse you for these broken items.</li>
<li>Natural disasters — Valuation insurance will not protect you if a natural disaster damages the shipment. These disasters include fires, hurricanes, tornadoes, windstorms, and hail.</li>
<li>Storage facilities — Moving companies don&#8217;t pay for items damaged in self-storage. You can buy a policy directly from the facility to cover these goods.</li>
</ul>
<h2>Negligent Acts That Can Reduce the Moving Company&#8217;s Liability</h2>
<p>Even though you&#8217;ve purchased insurance to protect your items, <a href="https://smartfinancial.com/insurance-coverage-moving" target="_blank">this coverage has its limits</a>. Several situations can reduce your mover&#8217;s liability for losses and damages to your household goods. They include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Intentional acts that cause damage to your items</li>
<li>Omissions about damaged or lost items</li>
<li>Declarations of a shipment value that is worth less than the stated amount</li>
<li>Failure to declare items that are worth more than $100 per pound</li>
</ul>
<h2>How Can I Select the Right Valuation Coverage for Me?</h2>
<p>Are you uncertain about which moving insurance is right for you? In this section, we&#8217;ll discuss a process that will help you determine which coverage can provide you with the right protection.</p>
<h3>Step One: Calculate the Total Worth of Your Belongings</h3>
<p>Before buying insurance, you must calculate the total value of your belongings so you can select the right coverage. During the first step, you&#8217;ll take a comprehensive inventory of all belongings. It should list all items, including your cookware, clothing, furniture, art, appliances, and other goods.</p>
<p>When documenting your items, note any damage. Consider videoing your items or taking time-stamped pictures with your phone. These should be clear photographs of your valuables. You can upload them to your cloud service. Other free options include Google Drive, Pinterest, or Facebook.</p>
<p>Label and chronicle each photo. If possible, estimate the relative market value for each one and save these values in a spreadsheet document. After you itemize all of your valuables, calculate their total value. Once you determine their cost, decide which coverage can better protect your goods. You can select either released value or full value protection.</p>
<p>Taking pictures of your valuables can also provide additional benefits. If the moving company loses or damages your items, these pictures will provide proof of their condition when you submit a claim.</p>
<p>Even though this process is time-consuming, it provides significant benefits‌.</p>
<h3>Step Two: Determine If Released Value Protection Will Provide Enough Coverage</h3>
<p>Before you select this coverage, estimate the total weight of your household goods. For example, you may believe that your valuables weigh 20,000 pounds in total. If you select released value coverage, the insurance company will only pay 60 cents for these goods.</p>
<p>It means you&#8217;ll only get $12,000 in total for all your belongings‌. If your goods are worth less than this amount, released value insurance may be your best bet.</p>
<h3>Step Three: Determine if Full Value Protection Is Worth the Price</h3>
<p>After you finish your inventory, you may have valued your items at $50,000. If so, you probably determined that $12,000 of released valuation won&#8217;t provide enough coverage for your household goods. If this is the case, you should select full value protection insurance. This coverage may be worth the extra price, even if you have a higher premium and a $1,500 deductible.</p>
<h3>Step Four: Get Extra Coverage for Items of Extraordinary Value</h3>
<p>If you have high-value goods that are worth more than $100 per pound, you may purchase extra coverage. List each high-value good within the shipping manifest so that the movers will cover any lost, damaged, or stolen items.</p>
<h3>Step Five: Review Your Contract to Learn What Moving Insurance Your Mover Offers</h3>
<p><a href="https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/" target="_blank">The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration</a> is a government agency that oversees interstate moves. It recommends customers learn about moving insurance options before signing a bill of lading contract and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">hiring a moving company</a>.</p>
<p><a href="https://www.movers.com/moving-guides/what-is-the-bill-of-lading.html" target="_blank">A bill of lading</a> is a legal contract between you and the moving company. It ensures the movers will pick up, transport, and deliver your household goods to your new place.</p>
<p>By federal law, companies must give estimates to customers for every interstate shipment. During a consultation, your moving company will provide you with an estimate. They will also review their insurance coverage options. Here are three things to keep in mind before signing your contract:</p>
<ul>
<li>Review your moving company estimate. Your mover should list the estimate type in the first section of your contract. It determines how the movers will calculate charges for your shipment.</li>
<li>Examine your liability coverage contract for any discrepancies, mistakes, or missing information.</li>
<li>The FMCSA says customers should never sign a blank moving estimate form.</li>
</ul>
<h2>The Responsibilities of Consumers During the Moving Process</h2>
<p>Do you understand your duties as a consumer? During interstate moves, customers have <a href="https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/Rights-and-Responsibilities-2013.pdf?" target="_blank">five responsibilities</a> under federal law:</p>
<ol>
<li>Read all moving documents and contracts provided by a mover or broker.</li>
<li>Be present when the movers pick up and move your valuables. If you can&#8217;t be there, have a representative present to act on your behalf.</li>
<li>Notify the movers if something has changed in your shipment. For instance, tell them if you need to change the move date or add other valuables.</li>
<li>Pay the amount the moving company has required.</li>
<li>Immediately file claims for any lost, damaged, or stolen items.</li>
</ol>
<h2>Homeowners and Renters Insurance May Provide Some Coverage for Do-It-Yourself Moves</h2>
<p>Some people try to cut their moving costs with a do-it-yourself move. They pack their own valuables and move to their new home with the help of friends or family members. Even if you handle a move on your own, you still need the right coverage to protect any lost, damaged, or destroyed household goods during a move.</p>
<p>Before moving, contact your local insurance agent if you have either a <a href="https://smartfinancial.com/insurance-coverage-moving" target="_blank">homeowners insurance policy</a> or renters insurance policy. You can ask if these policies will cover any lost, stolen, or damaged items. Typically, insurers only cover ten percent of your belongings’ value during a do-it-yourself move. You can also ask your insurer if they sell relocation insurance. This is similar to declared value and lump sum insurance policies.</p>
<p>Ask what your auto insurance covers during a do-it-yourself move. Generally, these policies won&#8217;t provide you with any protection. You must assume the risk for your items if you use your own vehicle.</p>
<p>Renting a truck for your move may be a better option. Your auto policy&#8217;s comprehensive and collision coverage won&#8217;t transfer to commercial rental moving trucks during a move, but you can get optional collision waiver damage from the rental company. Additionally, these businesses offer insurance that protects the rental moving truck, driver, passengers, or cargo, depending on your coverage.</p>
<p>You can also consider buying total loss coverage from your insurance company to protect yourself during a move. It will protect your belongings if a natural catastrophe, fire, or accident damages them. It is the only coverage that will cover the total loss of your belongings.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Insurance Options for Do-It-Yourself Moves</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7045" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Couple-looking-at-their-moving-insurance-policies-during-a-DIY-move.jpg" alt="Couple looking at their moving insurance policies before a DIY move" width="1253" height="836" /></p>
<p>Are you handling your upcoming move yourself? If so, speak with your insurance agent and ask about several rider policies for <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/">do-it-yourself moves</a>. You can tack on this coverage to your homeowners or renters insurance to protect your valuable items. There are five policies you can consider:</p>
<h3>1. Trip Transit Insurance</h3>
<p>This coverage pays for lost, damaged, or stolen items during a move. It also covers household goods that you place into storage. Private insurers provide these policies for homeowners and renters insurance policyholders. They typically cover do-it-yourself moves. Professional movers offer it as an excess coverage type since moving insurance may not cover items during transit. Like other policies, trip transit insurance won&#8217;t pay for items damaged in storage facilities. It also doesn&#8217;t cover goods damaged during natural disasters.</p>
<h3>2. Floater Policies</h3>
<p>These policies protect expensive items such as collectibles, jewelry, antiques, and valuable art.</p>
<h3>3. Special Perils Content Coverage</h3>
<p>This insurance will pay for items broken during transit. It doesn&#8217;t pay for fragile objects.</p>
<h3>4. Storage Unit Insurance</h3>
<p>You can consider getting this coverage for an additional $20 a month to protect your items in case of theft, floods, fires, or other natural disasters.</p>
<h3>5. Car Insurance Verification</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re shipping a vehicle to your new place, you can ask the company that&#8217;s managing your auto shipment for their insurance certificate. The law requires shipping companies to provide this documentation. Next, call your insurance company to find out if your policy will cover your car once it&#8217;s transported.</p>
<h2>Submitting a Claim to a Moving Insurance Company</h2>
<p>Have you finished moving into your new place? If so, there are several tips to keep in mind when filing a moving insurance claim.</p>
<ol>
<li>Check your belongings for any damaged or lost goods after you move in. Complete this process as soon as you move because many moving companies have a limited time frame for submitting a claim. If you wait too long, you could lose your opportunity to file.</li>
<li>Search for missing items before submitting a claim. If you notice an item is missing, look through boxes to see if it&#8217;s in a mislabeled box. If you can&#8217;t locate it after searching for it, then file a claim.</li>
<li>Submit your claim immediately after searching. This step will ensure that your moving company will process it quickly. Add any proof to verify your claim, including before and after pictures, videos, and receipts.</li>
</ol>
<p>Once you finish <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">unpacking</a>, you can finally settle down and relax in your new place. When everything’s in order, take a few moments and introduce yourself to your new neighbors or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/throw-housewarming-party/">have a housewarming party</a>.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-moving-insurance/">The Ultimate Guide to Moving Insurance</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Move a Gun Safe</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-gun-safe/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-gun-safe/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 28 Jan 2021 19:00:16 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[furniture]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Organization]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7029</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Many homeowners have wondered how to move a gun safe as part of their to-do list for moving to a new home. While tiny portable safes designed for a single handgun are easy to handle, the large heavy-duty safes designed to house several rifles are far more challenging. These safes can easily weigh hundreds of [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-gun-safe/">How to Move a Gun Safe</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Many homeowners have wondered how to move a gun safe as part of their <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving">to-do list for moving to a new home</a>. While tiny portable safes designed for a single handgun are easy to handle, the large heavy-duty safes designed to house several rifles are far more challenging. These safes can easily weigh hundreds of pounds and are often unwieldy because of their large size and flat shape. In this post, we&#8217;ll tell you how to move a gun safe the way the professional moving services do it.</p>
<h2>How to Move a Gun Safe: Preparation</h2>
<p>Moving a gun safe isn&#8217;t the same thing as <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">moving a couch</a>. You can&#8217;t just grab it and drag it wherever you want it to be. If you try to, it&#8217;s liable to fall over on you, or just not budge at all. You have to know how to move a heavy safe before you jump right into the attempt. The first part of that is understanding the preparation involved, so when you do start moving the safe, you&#8217;ll know you have everything accounted for.</p>
<h3>1. Make a Plan</h3>
<p>You aren&#8217;t going to want to have to move your gun safe repeatedly. It is a difficult process and requires a lot of work and planning. So before you start moving it, you should know exactly where you are moving it to. It would be best if you had a concrete plan to get from point A to point B that follows the guidelines presented in this article, and that means having a specific destination in mind.</p>
<h3>2. Measure the Safe</h3>
<p>As you move your gun safe, you will need to know the exact path you&#8217;ll be taking. Because gun safes are large items, this means measuring it to be sure that it will fit through the doorways and hallways that you plan on moving it through. While most of these will be big enough for the safe to fit through, measuring will let you know how much clearance you have while moving the safe through choke points and around tight corners.</p>
<h3>3. Clean and Dismantle the Safe</h3>
<p>The safe will be much easier to move if it is free from dust and debris that may reduce your grip on it. For this reason, you should clean it and let it thoroughly dry before attempting to move it.</p>
<p>Because you want the safe to be as light as possible while moving it, you should remove all of the contents (including ammo) from it. Also, remove any removable shelves, drawers, or attachments. Be sure to temporarily store the contents where only you, the gun owner, can reach them, and unload any loaded guns.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Gun Safe:</h4>
<p>The door of a large safe weighs a considerable amount, so you should remove that if possible.</p></blockquote>
<h3>4. Secure the Safe</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7031" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Man-securing-a-furniture-blanket-around-a-large-gun-safe.jpg" alt="Man securing a furniture blanket around a large gun safe" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>You don&#8217;t want any doors or drawers that couldn&#8217;t be removed to swing open while you are moving the safe. You also don&#8217;t want the hard surface of your safe damaging any walls or furniture that you may accidentally bump it into while moving it. Prevent both of these things from happening by wrapping the safe in furniture blankets and tying them in place. This will keep loose parts secure and provide padding to protect your other property.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Gun Safe:</h4>
<p>It can be hard to grip a blanket. Don&#8217;t forget to leave some unwrapped area so you&#8217;ll be able to get a good grip while moving the safe.</p></blockquote>
<h3>5. Get the Proper Equipment</h3>
<p>As stated earlier, moving a gun safe isn&#8217;t like moving a couch or other slightly heavy object. You should not attempt to move it with your arms. The weight will make it nearly impossible, and you can injure yourself very easily trying to manipulate something that large and heavy. So rent or borrow the necessary equipment for the job. You should use a furniture dolly with a high enough weight rating to handle the load or a hand truck. If you&#8217;re moving the safe up or down stairs, also rent a stair-climbing dolly.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Gun Safe:</h4>
<p>Although people aren&#8217;t equipment, having a few friends to help you with the move is also important! Some of them may also already have furniture blankets or an appliance dolly you can use.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Move a Gun Safe: Protecting Your Floors</h2>
<p>Now you are almost ready to begin moving the safe. But before you do, you need to know how to move a gun safe on carpet, linoleum, tile, and other flooring surfaces to prevent property damage. Carpet can make the wheels of your dolly harder to turn or snag them up. Tile is very easy to crack under the heavy load of a gun safe, especially when all of that weight is concentrated on the two wheels of a dolly. With some preparation, you&#8217;ll be able to keep yourself and your flooring safe during the move.</p>
<h3>Put Down Padding and a Hard Surface</h3>
<p>For padding, you can use a roll-out mat or more blankets. The padding will provide a little cushion to protect the floor surface. It also serves as a barrier to prevent the floor from being scuffed and as a base for the hard surface that will do the real work of protection. The hard surface will ideally be sheets of steel. This will disperse the weight of the safe across its entire surface and help control the pressure on your flooring. You can use plywood, but that tends to crack under heavy loads.</p>
<p>But you won&#8217;t be able to place the hard surface everywhere, and tight corners will be especially tricky. For unprotected areas of the floor, be sure to move the safe slowly and steadily.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Gun Safe:</h4>
<p>You can reuse the same few steel sheets over a long distance. How? Remove one once you&#8217;ve rolled the safe over it and move it to the path in front of the safe.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Move a Gun Safe in 3 Steps</h2>
<p>The safe is ready, the floor is ready, and now you are ready to begin the actual transportation of the item. <a href="https://www.homesafesavers.com/how-heavy-is-a-gun-safe" target="_blank">Gun safes weigh a lot</a>, so you need to be careful while transporting them through your house. Let&#8217;s talk about the proper way to move a safe so that all the preparation you&#8217;ve done so far wasn&#8217;t for nothing.</p>
<h3>1. Gather Your Friends and Family</h3>
<p>We mentioned people being an important asset when moving a gun safe. Now that you are ready to start moving your safe, it&#8217;s time to call those people over. You want two or three good helpers to aid in you lifting, maneuvering, and navigating the safe to its destination. Because gun safes can be very heavy items, it helps if one of those people knows how to move a 2,000 pound safe. Even if your gun safe isn&#8217;t quite that heavy, the knowledge will come in handy.</p>
<h3>2. Move the Safe With a Hand Truck or Dolly</h3>
<p>Next, we&#8217;ll talk about how to move a gun safe with a hand truck. This is a requirement because it&#8217;s the only safe way to move something that heavy. Before moving an object as large as a gun safe, it helps if you already know <a href="https://blog.hireahelper.com/how-to-use-a-dolly-like-the-pros/" target="_blank">how to use a dolly</a>. You may need to have several people tilt the safe so you can slide the dolly under it. With the dolly in place, secure the supporting straps and have your helpers aid you in tilting the dolly onto its wheels.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Gun Safe:</h4>
<p>If you&#8217;re loading the safe into a moving truck, make sure the loading ramp is rated to handle the weight of the heavy object.</p></blockquote>
<h3>3. Ensure Any Stairs on the Route Can Hold the Weight</h3>
<p>If the safe is upstairs, then you are going to need to know how to move a gun safe down the stairs. This isn&#8217;t always as simple as loading it onto the moving dolly or hand-truck and easing it down. Unlike flooring, stairs aren&#8217;t built to hold extremely large amounts of weight. It isn&#8217;t uncommon for someone to end up with a repair bill for their stairs after trying to move something too heavy up or down them. Here are some tips for safely moving gun safes down the stairs with a hand truck:</p>
<ul>
<li>Ensure that nobody is downstairs in the path of the safe should it fall. This will minimize the risk of injury.</li>
<li>Don&#8217;t tilt the hand truck too far back while going downstairs — it can cause you to lose your balance.</li>
<li>Approach the stairs, and any obstacles, with the wheels straight on to avoid tipping.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Gun Safe:</h4>
<p>Some hand trucks come with electric motors designed to ease the process of going up and down stairs.</p></blockquote>
<h2>The Takeaway</h2>
<p>With the proper preparation, equipment, and help, moving a gun safe is part of the moving process that you&#8217;ll be able to handle. If you&#8217;re not sure you can move the item safely, you should consider <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers">hiring professional movers</a>. They will know how to move a gun safe without damaging property or injuring people. But keep in mind that a moving company will often have weight limits on what they will transport, so it helps to know how much your safe weighs when calling them.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-gun-safe/">How to Move a Gun Safe</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Be a Good Neighbor (Even During a Pandemic)</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-be-a-good-neighbor/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-be-a-good-neighbor/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 26 Jan 2021 16:00:23 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Lifestyle]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7005</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Wondering how to be a good neighbor during a pandemic (and beyond)? We have all the tips you need on being the best neighbor you can be — now, and as the pandemic ends.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-be-a-good-neighbor/">How to Be a Good Neighbor (Even During a Pandemic)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>One thing that’s made it tougher to be a good <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">neighbor</a> recently is the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. While good neighbors watch each other’s kids and invite each other to parties and events, those are things no one should be doing right now — in fact, they could put your neighbors at risk, which is the opposite of being a good neighbor.</p>
<p>So, for as long as the pandemic continues (and as it finally comes to an end), consider these neighborly actions.</p>
<p><span id="more-7005"></span></p>
<h3>For Now, Keep Your Distance</h3>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7009 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/01-During-the-Pandemic-1.png" alt="For Now, Keep Your Distance" width="1789" height="355" /></p>
<p>One of the best things you can do for your neighbors at the moment is keep your distance from them. COVID-19 is deadly and highly contagious, so social distancing from friends and neighbors helps keep them (and you) as safe as possible.</p>
<p>Another aspect of being a good neighbor right now is not having parties or gatherings. Putting yourself at risk inevitably puts the people around you at risk, and that includes your neighbors. Follow <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html" target="_blank">CDC directives</a> and stay socially distanced, wear a mask, and do your part to help slow the spread of COVID-19.</p>
<h3>Create a Bubble With Neighbors You Trust</h3>
<p>If you and your neighbors are being careful about following CDC guidelines, it’s possible to create a “bubble” with a few neighbors you trust to exhibit safe behavior. That means you can visit each other’s homes and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/survey-quarantine-brought-families-closer-together/">spend time together</a>, creating opportunities for much-needed social contact while still staying safe.</p>
<p>This is an especially good idea if you and your neighbors have kids who are similar ages who are <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/remote-learning-isnt-working/">remote learning</a> during the pandemic. Kids miss their friends and crave social interaction, so creating a bubble to give them that safe opportunity for interaction is the kind of thing a great neighbor would do.</p>
<h3>Share Cards, Gifts, and Garden Hauls</h3>
<p>Experts say COVID-19 isn’t reliably spread on surfaces, which means it’s pretty safe to do things like sending cards or small gifts occasionally to help encourage your neighbors during quarantine. You could even share homemade baked goods or some vegetables from your garden. Just be sure to arrange a contact-free drop-off for anything you do decide to share.</p>
<h3>Start a Neighborhood Free Game Room, Library, or Food Bank</h3>
<p>For years, <a href="https://littlefreelibrary.org/" target="_blank">Little Free Libraries</a> have been a popular community resource, but they’re even better in a pandemic because they provide a way for neighbors to intermingle with one another with no physical contact required. You could even expand on the idea and create a free board game cabinet for neighbors to borrow from. Or, if anyone in your neighborhood is struggling with the economic impacts of the pandemic, start a neighborhood food pantry where everyone can help each other out with non-perishable goods.</p>
<h3>Organize a Distanced Service Project</h3>
<p>There’s no time like a crisis to give back to your neighborhood and your community. Rally your neighbors to do some good with a socially distanced service project. For some ideas, you could <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">clean up an elderly neighbor’s yard</a>, pick up litter in a park or other public place in your neighborhood, start a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/make-raised-garden-bed/">community garden</a>, or organize a meal train for a family that’s sick or in quarantine. Any service project that allows you to stay in your own homes or outdoors and spread out should be a safe option right now.</p>
<h3>Keep Up with Your Neighbors and Take Care of One Another</h3>
<p>The pandemic has created a lot of new challenges for many people. One of the best things you can do right now is just keep up with your neighbors. Make it a habit to drop them an email once a week, or give them a call. See how they’re doing. And if anyone gets sick, see what you can do to help take care of them. If they’re quarantined at home, they probably need help with getting food or medicine, and you can step up.</p>
<p><strong>Related post: </strong><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/">The 25 Most Neighborly Cities in America</a></p>
<h2>How to Be a Good Neighbor As the Pandemic Ends</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7010 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/02-After-the-Pandemic.png" alt="How to Be a Good Neighbor As the Pandemic Ends" width="1789" height="355" /></p>
<p>There’s a light at the end of the tunnel! With vaccine distribution beginning, we now know that the end of the COVID-19 pandemic could be coming as soon as this year. So as the pandemic ends, how can you be a good neighbor? Here are a few ideas.</p>
<h3>Invite Your Neighbors Over</h3>
<p>As the pandemic ends, we’re all going to have something in common: We’re going to be absolutely starved for social contact with other people. So as vaccines continue to roll out and people in your neighborhood receive theirs, start planning social get-togethers. You can just have a neighbor or two over for a low-key time at home, or organize an entire block party. Let’s celebrate being able to truly be neighbors again.</p>
<h3>Offer to House and Pet Sit</h3>
<p>Odds are, your neighbors will be doing some traveling after the pandemic ends. People have put off seeing loved ones and taking vacations while it’s been dangerous to travel, and will likely want to make up for some lost time. With that in mind, offer to keep an eye on the house, grab the mail, and check in on pets for neighbors who are heading out of town. If you offer to do it for them, odds are good that they’ll return the favor, giving you a chance to take a long-awaited post-pandemic trip.</p>
<h3>Be Respectful with Parties and Gatherings</h3>
<p>As you start to gather with friends and family again, it might be easy to get caught up in the excitement after such a long time spent social distancing. But age-old rule about being courteous with your gatherings still apply: Make sure guests park in appropriate places, don’t be too loud, cut things off at an appropriate hour, and give your neighbors a heads up (or an invite) before you host a large party.</p>
<h2>How to Be a Good Neighbor — <em>All</em> the Time</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7011 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/03-All-the-Time.png" alt="How to Be a Good Neighbor — All the Time" width="1789" height="355" /></p>
<p>This pandemic isn’t going to last forever, and life should return to something resembling normalcy soon. So without all these special circumstances to take into account, here’s how to be a good neighbor <em>all</em> the time.</p>
<h3>Remember the Golden Rule</h3>
<p>There’s one way to be a good neighbor that never goes out of style: Living by the Golden Rule. Treat others how you would like to be treated, and you’re unlikely to ever be anything less than a good neighbor.</p>
<h3>Share Important Information</h3>
<p>Good neighbors are ones who keep each other in the know.</p>
<p>NextDoor provides a pre-built platform for this, and it comes with features like crime tracking, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-things/">buying and selling</a>, and more. But you can keep things more simple than that. A neighborhood website, email list, or even a text chain can be all it takes to keep neighbors in the loop about anything important that’s going on.</p>
<h3>But Don’t Gossip</h3>
<p>On the other hand, it’s important not to be the neighborhood gossip. Talking about your neighbors behind their backs is some decidedly un-neighborly conduct, so don’t do that. It’s also a good idea to be mindful about what you post about your neighborhood and neighbors on social media. Everyone needs to vent sometimes, but if you’re venting about the people next door in a place where they can see what you’ve said, you should probably think twice before hitting “publish” on that post.</p>
<h3>Be a Responsible Pet Owner</h3>
<p>If you have cats, keep them indoors so they don’t leave waste on your neighbors’ property or hunt the local bird population. And if you’re a dog owner, keep your pet on a leash during walks and clean up after him or her. A big part of being a good neighbor is making sure it’s never anyone else’s job to look after your pets — unless a good neighbor has volunteered to watch them while you’re away, of course.</p>
<h3>Offer Up Extra Space in Your Home</h3>
<p>If you have a spare closet, attic space, or shelves in the garage that you aren’t using, be a good neighbor by offering that space for someone nearby who needs a safe and secure spot to store some of their belongings. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">Neighbor</a> is a peer-to-peer platform that matches people’s empty space with other people’s extra stuff — and brings people and neighborhoods together in the process. Check it out, and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/host">list your extra space</a> today.</p>
<h3>Take Good Care of Your Home</h3>
<p>Everyone in your neighborhood has a vested interest in keeping home values as high as possible and avoiding eyesores in the neighborhood. That’s why all neighbors have a shared responsibility to take good care of their homes. Repaint when needed. Landscape your front yard, if you have one. Keep up with regular maintenance and make sure your home stays safe, clean, and nice-looking.</p>
<h3>Take Pride in Your Neighborhood</h3>
<p>And, on that note, keep in mind that your responsibility isn’t <em>just</em> to your home. There’s more to the neighborhood than that.</p>
<p>Great neighbors go above and beyond to make sure the entire community is a place where people take care of one another and want to live. Invest your time and resources in public and community spaces that make the neighborhood nicer. Look out for your neighbors and help them take care of their homes, too.</p>
<p>At the end of the day, neighborhoods would be nothing without the people who live in them. That’s what it all comes down to — and why being a good neighbor is so important.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-7012 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/04-How-to-Be-a-Good-Neighbor-Infographic.png" alt="how to be a good neighbor" width="1789" height="3065" /></p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-be-a-good-neighbor/">How to Be a Good Neighbor (Even During a Pandemic)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Load a Moving Truck (And 7 Items You Should Leave Out)</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/load-moving-truck-7-items-leave/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/load-moving-truck-7-items-leave/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 21 Jan 2021 19:00:46 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving checklist]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7034</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Your boxes are packed and moving day is right around the corner. You&#8217;re probably thinking that most of the hard work is done, but packing a moving truck requires just as much planning and technical know-how. To maximize the space in your rental truck, you&#8217;ll need to load strategically and position your furniture with care. [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/load-moving-truck-7-items-leave/">How to Load a Moving Truck (And 7 Items You Should Leave Out)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Your boxes are packed and moving day is right around the corner. You&#8217;re probably thinking that most of the hard work is done, but packing a moving truck requires just as much planning and technical know-how. To maximize the space in your rental truck, you&#8217;ll need to load strategically and position your furniture with care. More importantly, proper loading techniques protect your belongings from damage and balance the truck for a smoother ride. Before you begin <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/">your DIY move</a>, it&#8217;s essential to learn how to load a moving truck.</p>
<h2>Supplies Checklist for How to Load a Moving Truck</h2>
<p>Moving professionals who know how to load a moving truck use a variety of supplies to safely load valuable possessions and unwieldy furniture into the back of a rental truck. Even when you&#8217;ve followed all the packing rules, you&#8217;ll need to make sure those carefully packed items fit snugly in place and don&#8217;t shift in transit. Make sure you have these supplies on hand before you get started:</p>
<ul>
<li>Moving Blankets</li>
<li>Furniture Dolly</li>
<li>Padding</li>
<li>Mattress Protectors</li>
<li>Furniture Pads</li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/">Packing Tape</a></li>
<li>Gloves</li>
<li>Plastic Wrap</li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Extra Boxes</a></li>
<li>Moving Straps</li>
</ul>
<h2>7 Steps to Properly Load Your Moving Truck</h2>
<p>Loading a truck seems easy. Your possessions are safely packed and taped up tight, so you can just cram everything in and go. But not so fast. Understanding how to load a moving truck requires time and precision. Plan to start early and pack the right way. Otherwise, you&#8217;ll likely spend twice as much time shifting your possessions around and making multiple trips. Take these steps to load your rental truck like a professional.</p>
<h3>1. Determine What Size Rental Truck You Need</h3>
<p>Before you can decide how to load a moving truck, you have to know <a href="https://www.uhaul.com/Articles/Tips/15591/How-To-Choose-The-Right-Size-Moving-Truck-Rental/" target="_blank">what size to rent</a>. If your truck is too small, then you&#8217;ll have to make multiple trips to move all of your belongings to your new home. This isn&#8217;t an option if you have a long distance to travel, and it&#8217;s usually not practical for a short move, either.</p>
<p>Popular moving truck rental companies (like U-haul, Penske, and Budget) have a variety of rental trucks and vans in various sizes. To determine what size moving truck you need, read the truck rental company&#8217;s size guidelines carefully. If you&#8217;re still not sure, consider using an online moving calculator or speaking to a truck rental representative from the truck rental company you plan to use.</p>
<h3>2. Recruit Helpers</h3>
<p>A one-person moving team is an easy way to end up with damaged furniture and severe injuries. Plan your moving day with plenty of time to spare so that you can recruit friends and family members to help you load the truck. You may not be able to afford the cost of hiring and tipping professional movers, but you can enlist some friends for the job.</p>
<p>If your assistants don&#8217;t know how to load a moving truck, you can supervise. Enlist your helpers well in advance of moving day and be prepared to provide a hearty meal as a thank you when the work is complete.</p>
<h3>3. Disassemble Your Furniture</h3>
<p>Many pieces of furniture are awkwardly shaped and can take up a large amount of space. Disassembling furniture will provide you with extra space and distribute the weight more evenly in the rental truck. While you can&#8217;t safely take apart all of your furniture, bed frames, dining tables, and some types of chairs can be easily disassembled.</p>
<h3>4. Load Heavy Items First</h3>
<p>Your heaviest items will require two people for loading and should be packed closest to the cab. Begin by safely loading large furniture and heavy appliances like <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">your refrigerator</a>, stove, washer, and dryer, using a furniture dolly and loading ramp. Line these heavy items along the front of the truck in their upright positions.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Load a Moving Truck:</h4>
<p>The best strategy for how to load a moving truck includes placing the heaviest items on both sides to balance the truck properly.</p></blockquote>
<h3>5. Load Long Items</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7036" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Family-loading-furniture-along-the-sides-of-a-moving-truck.jpg" alt="Family loading furniture along the sides of a moving truck" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Furniture like mattresses, box springs, and couches take up a considerable amount of room. These longer items will line the sides of the truck in an upright position to save space. Line up the bed frames, headboards, mattresses, and box springs on one side of the truck. Load couches, sofas, and loveseats on the opposite side of the truck to line the second wall.</p>
<h3>6. Load Boxes</h3>
<p>Place boxes on top of heavy furniture or stack them from floor to ceiling in the moving truck. Begin by stacking medium-sized boxes on top of heavy appliances and furniture at the front of the truck. Then place the largest, heaviest boxes along the truck floor in the middle between the furniture lining the truck&#8217;s walls. Stack boxes in rows with the heaviest on the bottom and lightest on top, securing each tier in place as you load.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Load a Moving Truck:</h4>
<p>Deciding how to load a moving truck might require some creativity. Make use of gaps under furniture, desks, in drawers, and on top of chair seats. You can easily secure moving boxes in any of these spots.</p></blockquote>
<h3>7. Fill in the Gaps</h3>
<p>You have items in your home that simply aren&#8217;t shaped for stacking. These possessions will fill in the gaps left by boxes and furniture. While most of your heavier items will already be packed, some household items still remain. You can tuck oddly shaped items around furniture or other boxes and secure them in place.</p>
<p>Lighter items and fragile items should be placed last to avoid risks of crushing. Any essentials you expect to use immediately should be placed at the back of the truck so you can easily remove them when it&#8217;s <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">time to unpack</a>. Before leaving, secure everything with moving straps, plastic wrap, or packing tape so that nothing can shift while you&#8217;re on the road.</p>
<h2>7 Items You Shouldn&#8217;t Pack in the Rental Truck</h2>
<p>Part of learning how to load a moving truck is knowing the items you should leave out. When you&#8217;re paying for a rental truck, you&#8217;re probably not planning to use your personal vehicle as a moving truck. Still, there are certain items that you should keep with you during travel. Plan to keep these possessions separate so that you can pack them in your car.</p>
<h3>1. Important Documents</h3>
<p>While essential documents like birth certificates, passports, health information, and IDs can be packed neatly into a secure box, keep them in your possession for the duration of your trip.</p>
<h3>2. Expensive Jewelry or Other Valuables</h3>
<p>Small, fragile items can be easily damaged or broken when treated improperly. Other valuables like fine art and musical instruments should also travel with you when possible. These items could be susceptible to damage related to temperature changes or changing weather.</p>
<h3>3. Necessities</h3>
<p>While you expect you and your moving truck to arrive at your destination at roughly the same time, things happen. Unpacking can be chaotic, and you need to be able to access certain items when you need them. Pack a bag with family medications, toiletries, diapers and wipes, cash, phones and chargers, and kitchen supplies.</p>
<h3>4. Pets and Supplies</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re traveling with pets, you probably planned alternate arrangements. But it can be easy to forget that your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-with-a-cat/">furry friend</a> needs food, water, and perhaps a few toys to keep him occupied during travel. So keep toys, a water bowl, and a small bag of food and treats available.</p>
<h3>5. Flammable Materials</h3>
<p>You may think your belongings don&#8217;t include flammable materials, but a variety of household items are flammable. For instance, beauty products like hair spray and nail polish remover are flammable. If it says, &#8220;keep away from open flame,&#8221; don&#8217;t pack it in the moving truck.</p>
<h3>6. Photo Albums</h3>
<p>While photos and photo albums pack neatly into boxes and aren&#8217;t likely to cause damage to anything in the truck, they&#8217;re irreplaceable in every way. Enough said.</p>
<h3>7. Weapons</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re a gun owner, then you must keep your weapons (even unloaded ones) in your control at all times. It&#8217;s difficult to control everything that occurs in and around your moving truck. Keep weapons in your personal vehicle for everyone&#8217;s safety.</p>
<p>Many people choose to save money with a DIY move instead of hiring a moving company. Most take a variety of packing tips into consideration but forget the details of loading. As you plan your move, learning how to load a moving truck is an essential step in making <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">your move go smoothly from start to finish</a>.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/load-moving-truck-7-items-leave/">How to Load a Moving Truck (And 7 Items You Should Leave Out)</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Ultimate Guide on How to Break a Lease</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-break-a-lease/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-break-a-lease/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 19 Jan 2021 19:00:22 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[apartment living]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Finances]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Renter]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=7018</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>There are times when an individual must relocate before their lease ends, such as when moving to a new state or due to a change in financial situation. Moving out before the end of the agreement is known as &#8220;breaking the lease.&#8221; Read on for more information about how to break a lease and: The [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-break-a-lease/">Ultimate Guide on How to Break a Lease</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>There are times when an individual must relocate before their lease ends, such as when <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-to-a-new-state/">moving to a new state</a> or due to a change in financial situation. Moving out before the end of the agreement is known as &#8220;breaking the lease.&#8221; Read on for more information about how to break a lease and:</p>
<ul>
<li>The potential financial consequences that you can incur from breaking a lease</li>
<li>The circumstances that can allow you to break the lease with fewer or no consequences</li>
<li>The steps you need to take to break your lease properly</li>
</ul>
<h2>Why Is Breaking a Lease Agreement Risky?</h2>
<p>In the U.S., around <a href="https://www.nmhc.org/research-insight/quick-facts-figures/quick-facts-resident-demographics/" target="_blank">43 million households are renters</a>. When renting a residence — whether it is a single-family dwelling, an apartment highrise that features units for hundreds of residents, or anything in between — you are normally required to sign a lease contract. Among other things, the lease agreement spells out how long the landlord will make the unit available for your use and the date upon which you are contractually free from paying rent on the unit.</p>
<p>Yes, people do break leases on a regular basis, and, no, you&#8217;re generally not going to go to jail for doing it. However, there are a number of potential consequences for the renter who breaks a lease agreement, including the following:</p>
<h3>You Could Find Yourself in a Legal Dilemma</h3>
<p>While landlords rarely sue their tenants for breaking a lease, it can and does happen. A signed lease is a legally binding contract. There are likely to be provisions for breaking the lease in that contract, and you agreed to those provisions when you entered into the contract. The civil court system is one way a landlord can pursue enforcement of that contract if you later decide to pull out of it without satisfying its provisions.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>How to break a lease and avoid this consequence:</h4>
<p>Be sure that you have read your lease and are prepared to meet the provisions that are spelled out in the contract for early termination before you break your lease. Pay the fines that you agreed to and leave the unit in good condition.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Breaking a Lease Is Costly</h3>
<p>When you enter into a lease agreement with a landlord, you agree to occupy the unit for a specific length of time. Your landlord is in the business of making money through his or her real estate. If the renter decides not to say for the full amount of time specified in the lease, the landlord will want to recoup at least a couple of months&#8217; rent or even all of the rent due for the remainder of the lease. You may also forfeit your security deposit.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>How to break a lease and avoid this consequence:</h4>
<p>Make sure you consult the part of your lease agreement that discusses early termination of the lease. Also, make sure you understand the related financial penalties. If you don&#8217;t know how much you will pay or you have a compelling reason why you can&#8217;t pay the full amount associated with breaking your lease, talk to your landlord about the situation. See what he or she has to say about it.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Breaking a Lease Is Hard on Your Credit</h3>
<p>Having unpaid fines and other unmet provisions tied to the early termination of your lease can hurt your credit. Also, the amount of debt and some of the details about the fines — such as damage to the home — can show up on your credit report. What this means is that, for at least the next several years, every time you attempt to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/what-is-a-good-credit-score-to-buy-a-house/">make a big purchase</a>, secure a loan, rent an apartment, or even apply for a job (in some cases), someone will see this information.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>How to break a lease without damaging your credit:</h4>
<p>Remember that breaking a lease does not specifically impact your credit score. Failing to pay the debts associated with breaking the lease does. Make sure you pay any fines related to terminating your lease agreement promptly. This will help you avoid having interactions with small claims court or a collection agency on your history.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Your New Landlord Will Likely Find Out</h3>
<p>Landlords prefer to rent to individuals who will pay their rent on time and keep the unit habitable. Often they will call on previous landlords as references when an individual applies to rent from them. Even if your previous landlord didn&#8217;t take you to small claims court or a collection agency, if you broke the lease without settling up your debt and meeting the provisions for doing so, the reference the landlord at <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/condo-vs-townhouse-your-ultimate-guide-to-choosing-the-right-home/">the place you&#8217;re hoping to move to next</a> receives will likely not be a good one.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>How to break a lease while staying on good terms with your former landlord:</h4>
<p>There are justifiable reasons to break the lease, and landlords understand that. If there was a valid reason for breaking your lease and you ensured that you were able to meet the terms of the early termination, you shouldn&#8217;t worry about what will be said if your next landlord calls for a reference.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Break a Lease: 5 Legally Protected Reasons</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7022" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/A-universal-lease-agreement-and-a-pair-of-keys.jpg" alt="A universal lease agreement and a pair of keys" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>There are certain reasons why an individual might be able to break a lease legally, without facing financial penalties for doing so. However, laws vary from one state to another. So it is important to know what your state has to say about whether your reason is legal. Some reasons that often result in a broken lease and no — or fewer — consequences include the following:</p>
<h3>1. Active Military Duty</h3>
<p>The <a href="https://www.military.com/benefits/military-legal-matters/servicemembers-civil-relief-act-overview.html" target="_blank">Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA)</a> is a federal law that provides a number of benefits for active-duty military personnel to prevent them from losing money or property due to deployment. One of the provisions of this law is the ability to end a housing lease without penalties if the renter will be deployed for 90 days or more. Additionally, if a person&#8217;s spouse dies during the course of active military duty, he or she can also legally break a lease agreement as a result of the SCRA.</p>
<h3>2. The Landlord Failed to Make the Rental Habitable</h3>
<p>In most states, landlords have to ensure that the property they&#8217;re renting is fit to be lived in. It must have running water at all times. It also must be kept in good repair and meet the state and local health and safety codes. They must keep common areas and stock them with trash bins. Failing to meet the general provisions for making a rental property habitable is a breach of contract every bit as much as breaking the lease or not paying rent is. If your landlord breaches the contract, you may have cause to legally break your lease.</p>
<h3>3. Provisions for Victims of Domestic Violence</h3>
<p>Many states provide protections against penalties for breaking a lease for individuals who have been the victim of domestic violence within the past three to six months. These early termination clauses for domestic violence victims generally require written notice to the landlord within at least 30 days before moving out. Tenants must inform the landlord that the lease is being broken under the state statutes that provide this protection.</p>
<h3>4. The Unit You&#8217;re Renting Is Not a Legal Apartment</h3>
<p>Various state laws determine what constitutes a legal apartment. For example, in <a href="https://www1.nyc.gov/site/hpd/services-and-information/housing-quality-and-safety.page" target="_blank">New York</a>, the ceiling height of a basement, cellar, or attic apartment must reach a certain height to be legal. All rented units must have windows in each designated bedroom space.</p>
<p>Often, property owners will attempt to rent out space that is not properly zoned or permitted for a residential dwelling. If you discover that the unit you have rented does not meet your state&#8217;s requirements for being a legal apartment, you have cause to break the lease without penalties.</p>
<h3>5. Your Landlord Trespasses</h3>
<p>Be aware that your landlord certainly does have the right to enter your apartment in certain circumstances. Usually, state laws spell out what those circumstances are, and those reasons often include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Entering during an emergency</li>
<li>Entering to make repairs to the property or to assess the need for repairs</li>
<li>To inspect the property for damage</li>
<li>To investigate the premises for violations of the rental agreement</li>
<li>Showing the property to prospective tenants</li>
<li>Showing the premises to insurance or mortgage companies</li>
<li>If the tenant invites the landlord to enter the apartment.</li>
</ul>
<p>Unless the landlord is invited into the tenant&#8217;s apartment, landlords must provide tenants with ample written notice before entering the premises. In most states, this notice is at least 24 hours. Also, the apartment must only be entered during &#8220;normal business hours,&#8221; which are usually Monday through Friday, from 9 AM to 5 PM.</p>
<p>If you want to know how to break a lease for this reason, start by collecting documentation of infractions. After the first time, you should ask the landlord in writing to refrain from violating the renter&#8217;s rights provided to you in state law. Keep a copy of the letter for your own records. Breaking your lease if your landlord fails to provide adequate notice of entry may require you to take legal action. You will likely need this documentation to prove your claim.</p>
<h2>Options for How to Break a Lease</h2>
<p>In many cases, you can reduce or completely avoid the penalties you face for breaking your lease agreement by helping the landlord to find a new tenant for the unit. There are a couple of ways to do that, including:</p>
<h3>1. Subletting</h3>
<p>If you sublet your rental property to someone else, they are essentially fulfilling your occupancy requirements that you agreed to until the lease expires. They’re paying you for the rental of the space. You then give this rent to the landlord. Some property owners and managers do not allow this. It is important that you get consent from your landlord before subletting your place.</p>
<p>If your landlord is amenable to you finding someone to sublet the space, you should remember that this does not take you legally off the hook for the rent or maintenance of the property. If the person you sublet the property to fails to pay his or her rent or trashes the place, you can still be held responsible.</p>
<p>Because of this, you must treat the scenario as if you are the landlord.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Break a Lease:</h4>
<p>Consider performing a background check and income verification. This will help ensure that the subletter is a responsible person with the financial means to make rent. You should further protect yourself by requiring the prospective resident to sign a contract to sublease/sublet.</p></blockquote>
<h3>2. Assigning the Lease</h3>
<p>Many people don&#8217;t wish to take on the additional responsibilities of a sublease agreement. Another option for getting out of your lease is to allow the lease to be assigned to someone else.</p>
<p>This means that the new renter will essentially enter into their own lease with the landlord. This involves paying their own security deposit, paying rent directly to the landlord, and dealing directly with them for any maintenance or repair issues that come up. Many times, in order to assign the lease, you will still have to be the one to find a new renter and ensure that this renter meets the landlord&#8217;s criteria. Your landlord also must agree to have the lease assigned.</p>
<h2>Four Steps for How to Break a Lease</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-7023" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Man-reading-his-lease-agreement-to-see-the-financial-penalties-of-terminating-a-lease-agreement-early.jpg" alt="Man reading his lease agreement to see the financial penalties of terminating a lease agreement early" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>If you need to move before your lease is up, it’s important to not just move out without saying anything to the landlord or move out after having given less than 30 days&#8217; notice of your plan to do so. This will not change your legal obligation to pay rent through the entire duration of the lease. It could also put you in danger of violating other aspects of the agreement. For example, your lease likely requires you to promptly inform the landlord of any needed repairs.</p>
<p>While following the rules of how to break a lease won&#8217;t necessarily protect you from all of the financial consequences of doing so, it can certainly help to mitigate some of the damage. Here are five steps to breaking a lease the right way.</p>
<h3>1. Read Your Lease Immediately</h3>
<p>The agreement you signed when you rented the place should spell out the requirements for early termination. Many landlords can and often do work with their tenants to lessen the hardship that is necessitating a broken lease. But be prepared for the worst-case scenario that you will be expected to pay the penalty listed for early termination of the agreement.</p>
<p>Often, this penalty is two months of rent and your security deposit. However, depending on your lease&#8217;s provisions, you could be responsible for the entire amount of rent that you would have paid for the duration of the time remaining on your lease.</p>
<h3>2. Submit Written Notice of Your Plan to Vacate, and Talk to Your Landlord</h3>
<p>This is a conversation that many people find uncomfortable to have. Remember, though, that it is always better when ending a legal agreement to do so honestly and transparently. This conversation could potentially save you from the worst penalties, such as small claims court or a collection agency. You might even find that your landlord is very willing to help you explore sublet or lease assignment options or provide other assistance.</p>
<p>Landlords live in the same expensive, chaotic society that you do, and they have had their own personal hardships. While not every landlord will work with you when it comes time to break a lease, many will. Time is of the essence when it comes to this conversation, however. The sooner your landlord knows that you are certain that you need to break your lease, the better. They&#8217;ll have more time — with your help — has to find a new tenant and avoid the loss of income.</p>
<h3>3. Offer to Help Find a New Tenant</h3>
<p>Breaking your lease represents a loss of income for the landlord. Being required to take time out of their busy schedules to look for a new tenant on a place they had counted on having occupied represents an impact on a landlord&#8217;s bottom line, too. However, if you are willing to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/what-is-subletting-and-how-does-it-work/">help find someone to replace that rental income</a>, you can likely avoid some of the consequences of breaking your lease.</p>
<p>Get everything down in writing and keep copies for yourself. This ensures that you have a paper trail to prove that you properly informed your landlord and made reasonable efforts to follow the directives for early termination. If the worst-case scenario happens and your landlord pursues action against you through court, you will need this documentation to show that you did your part to end the agreement amicably and live up to your legal obligations.</p>
<h3>4. Seek Legal Advice</h3>
<p>Suppose you&#8217;re planning to break your lease because the apartment is uninhabitable, you&#8217;re being charged too much, or your landlord has been trespassing or harassing you. In these cases, it is important to talk to an attorney about how to break a lease. Look for a lawyer who has experience with contract negotiation, particularly rental agreements. An attorney can help you understand your legal options and ensure that you break the lease legally.</p>
<h2>FAQs About How to Break a Lease Agreement</h2>
<p>Are you considering breaking your lease, but you still have unanswered questions? Here are some questions that are often asked about how to break a lease agreement.</p>
<h3>I am currently undergoing treatment for COVID-19 and am unable to afford my apartment. Is this a viable reason to break the lease without penalties?</h3>
<p>While state laws vary, health issues are not usually included as viable reasons to legally break an apartment lease. However, being unable to afford your rent due to health issues is certainly a problem that your landlord can understand, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/survey-quarantine-brought-families-closer-together/">particularly in light of the current pandemic</a>. Be honest with your landlord about the problem. He or she may be willing to work with you to find someone to sublet or assign the lease. They may even be willing to let you catch up on the missed rent.</p>
<h3>What do active military personnel need to do to break a lease for deployment?</h3>
<p>To terminate a lease agreement, you must notify your landlord in writing of your active duty or receipt of military orders. For month to month rentals, the lease termination is effective at the end of the month after the next rental payment is due. For a year-long lease term, the termination is effective the last day of the month following the month in which the landlord is notified.</p>
<p>You are required to pay rent only for the months before the lease is terminated. If you paid your rent in advance, the landlord must prorate and refund the unearned amount. They must also return any part of your security deposit that is not used to repair damage you caused to the property.</p>
<h3>If I send notice to my landlord that I plan to vacate the property and end the lease early, how do I know that they&#8217;ve seen it?</h3>
<p>It is always advisable to send your official notice to vacate to the landlord via certified mail. This way, you have proof that it has been received. You should also always keep a copy of such written notifications for yourself in case the details of the letter are later called into question.</p>
<h3>I agreed to help my landlord by finding someone to sublet my apartment. How do I do that?</h3>
<p>There are many places to find a replacement tenant. First, ask friends and family members if they know of someone who is looking for a place to live. If that does not yield results, look for rental pages or community pages on social media. Then make a post about the rental.</p>
<p>Be sure to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/spring-cleaning-list/">clean the rental unit</a> so you can include inviting photos in the listing, and describe its positive attributes. Be prepared to show the rental to those who are interested. Also, do your due diligence by calling references and verifying income to ensure they earn enough to make rent payments.</p>
<p>Once you find the right subletter, plan a quick, organized move out. Moving out with minimal disruption to the property minimizes stress for the landlord and keeps the relationship positive.</p>
<h3>My apartment doesn&#8217;t have running water. What should I do?</h3>
<p>Running water is essential to the habitability of a residential dwelling. If you do not have it, you have two options on how to break a lease:</p>
<ul>
<li>Complain to the landlord in writing and keep a copy of the complaint. Also, keep documentation of any action taken or any additional follow-ups.</li>
<li>Contact your local department of health if a significant amount of time has passed without action being taken on the matter.</li>
</ul>
<p>You can also pursue a legal claim in small claims court and ask to be released from your lease agreement.</p>
<p>While it is certainly preferable to see your lease out to its finish, there are some circumstances in which you have no choice but to know how to break a lease and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">move out quickly</a>. Doing so properly can help you avoid the financial and legal consequences. It can also ensure your ability to continue being considered a responsible renter by landlords for years to come.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
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         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
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</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-break-a-lease/">Ultimate Guide on How to Break a Lease</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Square Footage: How to Calculate It, How Much You Need, and More</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 12 Jan 2021 16:00:45 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6991</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Square footage is one of the most important data points about a home. Use this guide to learn how to measure, calculate, and estimate square footage on your own.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">Square Footage: How to Calculate It, How Much You Need, and More</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Do you know your home’s exact square footage?</p>
<p>If you don’t, you’re far from alone. While square footage is one of the most important data points to know about a home, there’s a lot of confusion about how to measure it. And first-hand accounts from homebuyers tell us you <a href="https://www.texasrealestate.com/members/communications/texas-realtor-magazine/issues/june-2019/the-square-footage-court-case-you-should-know-about/" target="_blank">can’t necessarily trust</a> the square footage that’s claimed on a home listing.</p>
<p><span id="more-6991"></span></p>
<p>This ultimate guide is one that every homeowner and renter needs. Here’s what we’ll cover below:</p>
<p><a href="#calculate">How to calculate square footage</a></p>
<p><a href="#importance">The importance of knowing square footage</a></p>
<p><a href="#free">Free square footage calculator</a></p>
<p><a href="#estimate">How to estimate square footage</a></p>
<p><a href="#determine">How to determine how much square footage you need</a></p>
<div id="calculate"></div>
<h2>How to calculate square footage</h2>
<p>Calculating square footage is, luckily, pretty simple. You just multiply the length of a room or house in feet by the width in feet.</p>
<p>The basic formula for square feet:</p>
<p>Length x Width = total area square footage</p>
<p>Unfortunately, that equation only applies to rooms and homes that are rectangular or square. If your home has any odd-shaped rooms, things get a lot more complicated.</p>
<p>It seems like a straightforward question: How do you calculate square footage in your home?</p>
<p>Unfortunately, the answer isn’t as straightforward as you’d think. For different purposes (like sale listings) states regulate what parts of a home should be measured, and what parts shouldn’t. Here’s what you need to know.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6993 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/01-How-to-Calculate-Square-Footage.png" alt="How to calculate square footage" width="1789" height="3204" /></p>
<p>The below methods and tips will work well if you have all or mostly rectangular rooms. If you have any more complex spaces and you aren’t particularly skilled in math, we recommend leaving the square footage calculation to an expert (like an appraiser), or consulting your home’s floor plan.</p>
<h3>Tools needed to measure square footage</h3>
<p>There are a few different ways you can measure your square footage.</p>
<ul>
<li>Something to take notes (either a pen and paper, or a phone or other device with a notepad app);</li>
<li>A tape measure or laser measuring tool.</li>
</ul>
<div id="importance"></div>
<h2>The importance of knowing square footage</h2>
<p>What’s the big deal about square footage, anyway? Why is it so hard to calculate — and so important to know?</p>
<p>Square footage is a necessary piece of data for determining a number of things about your home and your family’s needs. These are just some of the reasons it’s so important to know and understand square footage.</p>
<h3>Home value and price per square foot</h3>
<p>First and foremost, square footage is a major factor in determining your home’s value. Generally, when appraising a home, professionals will first calculate the exact square footage, and then compare your home to other homes in the same area with a comparable amount of living space.</p>
<p>They’ll make adjustments based on factors like your home’s age, materials, and finishes — but square footage is the single most important factor (and the first step) in setting a value or sale price for your home. Additionally, being familiar with the price per square foot for your home and similar, nearby listings can give you a point of reference for comparing different properties when shopping for a home.</p>
<p>This is also one of the reasons it’s so important to get an accurate measurement of your home’s square footage — if it’s measured incorrectly, that can have a domino effect that throws off your home’s value, sale price, and more.</p>
<h3>Home renovation costs</h3>
<p>If you ever make any major updates to your home — for example, renovating your kitchen or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-renovate-your-basement/">finishing your basement</a> — you’ll likely need to know the exact square footage in order to get building permits.</p>
<p>Knowing the exact square footage of a space you’re renovating is also helpful when it comes to <a href="https://www.budgetdumpster.com/blog/budget-home-renovation/" target="_blank">making cost estimations</a> and setting a budget for the project. Different areas, like kitchens, bathrooms, and basements, have different average costs per square foot to renovate, so familiarizing yourself with these can help you set a realistic budget for making over your own space.</p>
<h3>Property taxes</h3>
<p>Since square footage is such an important factor in your home’s value, it’s also a big part of determining your yearly property taxes, which are based on the assessed value of the home and property. If your square footage is improperly calculated, it could result in you over- or under-paying on your taxes.</p>
<p>Additionally, if you work from home, knowing your home’s square footage can help provide tax benefits — you may be able to write off a portion of your rent or mortgage payments and utilities based on the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/simplified-option-for-home-office-deduction#:~:text=Standard%20deduction%20of%20%245%20per,interest%2C%20real%20estate%20taxes)." target="_blank">square footage of a home office</a> or work area.</p>
<h3>Knowing your (and your family’s) needs</h3>
<p>Finally, knowing and understanding square footage can help you better understand exactly what your family needs when looking for a home. We’ll get into this in more detail below, but it’s always a good idea to know how much square footage your family needs to live and function comfortably.</p>
<div id="free"></div>
<h2>Free square footage calculator</h2>
<p>Need help calculating your square footage? The calculator below can help (and, optionally, you can estimate home values if you know the average cost per square foot in your area).</p>
<div id="inch-calculator-icw" data-ct="square_footage" data-cw="600" data-ch="420" data-cv="MTE2MDk4MDA1MzM=">
<div id="inch-calculator-icwh">Square Footage Calculator</div>
<div id="inch-calculator-icwf"><a id="inch-calculator-icwi" href="https://www.inchcalculator.com/square-footage-calculator/" target="_blank"><img id="inch-calculator-icwl" src="https://cdn.inchcalculator.com/e/inch-calculator-logo-tiny.png" alt="Inch Calculator Logo" /><span id="inch-calculator-icwb">Inch Calculator</span></a></div>
</div>
<p><script src="https://cdn.inchcalculator.com/e/widgets.min.js" async defer></script></p>
<h3>Additional Tips for Calculating Square Footage</h3>
<p>These tips will make calculating and estimating square footage even easier.</p>
<p><strong>Measure room by room</strong></p>
<p>One simple way to calculate your home’s square footage is by measuring each room, calculating its square footage, and then adding all your totals together. This method works well if all your rooms and spaces are rectangular, keeping the calculations fairly simple.</p>
<p><strong>Measure the outside of the house</strong></p>
<p>Alternatively, if your home is just one story and rectangular shaped, you can calculate the square footage of the entire home in one equation by measuring outside. Measure the length and width of the entire home and multiply them to determine your total square footage.</p>
<p><strong>Double check against your home’s floor plan</strong></p>
<p>If you have access to your home’s blueprint or floor plan, it may tell you the square footage. It’s a good idea to check your calculations against the dimensions on the floor plan for accuracy.</p>
<p><strong>Refer to regulations and guidelines</strong></p>
<p>You shouldn’t necessarily include <em>every</em> space in your home in your square footage calculations. For example, if you have a multi-story home with a foyer that’s two-stories high, you wouldn’t be able to calculate the square footage on the ground floor and then just double it — the foyer square footage would need to be subtracted from the second-story total.</p>
<p>Additionally, the <a href="https://www.ansi.org/" target="_blank">American National Standards Institute</a> provides guidelines for measuring home square footage, which is typically what governments use to assess property taxes, and what most realtors use for home listings. According to those guidelines, you shouldn’t include certain spaces in your square footage calculations:</p>
<ul>
<li>Garages;</li>
<li>Balconies;</li>
<li>Porches;</li>
<li>Basements, even if they’re finished;</li>
<li>Attics if they’re unfinished, not insulated, or have low ceilings.</li>
</ul>
<p>These are all just guidelines, though. No one enforces them, which is why it’s so important to do your own calculations to ensure you have an accurate square footage measurement for your own home and any home you’re considering buying or renting.</p>
<p><strong>For an exact square footage measurement, hire a professional</strong></p>
<p>If you want to be really sure you’re accurate in measuring your home’s square footage, there are experts for that: appraisers. Hiring one means they’ll take an ultra-accurate measurement of your square footage, while also considering other factors about your home, to place a potential sales value on it. It’s common to have a home appraised before you sell it, but you can actually do it at any time.</p>
<div id="estimate"></div>
<h2>How to quickly estimate square footage</h2>
<p>Sometimes, you might need to estimate or visualize square footage without being able to measure it exactly. This is an especially useful skill if you’re shopping for a home or apartment. Here are some tips, tricks, and examples for making square footage estimates in the real world.</p>
<h3>Use your body</h3>
<p>One way to get a rough estimate of the width and length of a space is by using your own body. Measure body lengths to use your height. Or measure the length of your foot and walk heel-to-toe to measure the distance. You can also measure the length of your stride, but this will result in a less accurate measurement, since it will vary a little bit with each step.</p>
<h3>Use tiles</h3>
<p>If the room you’re trying to estimate has tiles on the floor, you can use them to get an estimate of the square footage by assuming that each tile will be around one square foot. Remember that tiles can be larger or smaller than this, though, so your accuracy may vary with this method depending on how close the tiles are to 12 inches.</p>
<h3>Visualize comparative spaces</h3>
<p>If you don’t need an exact number, but just a rough guess of the square footage of a space, you can compare it to items or other spaces you might be familiar with. For example,</p>
<ul>
<li>A king size bed is 42.15 square feet.</li>
<li>The inside of a school bus is about 300 square feet.</li>
<li>A one-car garage is about 200 square feet, while a two-car garage will be around 400 square feet.</li>
</ul>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6994 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/02-How-to-Estimate-Square-Footage.png" alt="How to quickly estimate square footage" width="1789" height="846" /></p>
<p><em> </em></p>
<div id="determine"></div>
<h2>How much square footage do you need?</h2>
<p>Now for the reason many families set out to learn about square footage in the first place: To find out how much of it they need.</p>
<p>Census Bureau statistics say that overall, newly constructed <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/americans-outgrow-living-space/">homes are getting bigger and bigger</a>. But at the same time, minimalist living remains popular, and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/tiny-house-movement/">tiny homes</a> are a trend that isn’t slowing down.</p>
<p>At the end of the day, it’s subjective. There’s no simple rule that will tell you exactly the right size home for your family. But here are some guidelines to help you begin to figure out how much space your family needs in a home.</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Start with your existing square footage. </strong>First, calculate an accurate square footage for your existing home so you have a starting point. Then, sit down (with your family, if you’d like), and think about whether your current home is too small, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/downsizing-benefits-tips-and-cost-calculator/">too big</a>, or just right for you. Depending on what you decide, you should have a better idea of the kind of square footage you should look for in your next home.</li>
<li><strong>Consider your family’s needs. </strong>How big is your family? Do you need a home office? Do you often have friends or family visiting who need a guest room where they can spend the night? These questions will also help you figure out what kind of square footage you need — the bigger your family and the more spaces you need, the more square footage you’re likely to want for your home.</li>
<li><strong>Think about your furniture. </strong>In some cases, your possessions will be a factor in how much square footage you need. For example, if you have a king sized bed set, you’ll need a home with at least one large bedroom to accommodate it. Same thing if you have a large sectional couch, an eight-person dining set, or a pool table.</li>
<li><strong>Maintain the right ratio. </strong>According to some experts, for every bedroom in your home, you should have the space to seat two people in the dining room and living room. Keep that ratio in mind as you look at homes — you don’t want to end up with a bedroom for everyone, but no room for the family in common spaces.</li>
<li><strong>Remember how much difference a good layout can make. </strong>For example, a 2,500 square foot home with each room closed off will seem smaller than a 2,200 square foot home with an open concept floor plan. Keep this in mind, and don’t be too set on one specific number — there’s no such thing as the “perfect” square footage for any family; just a home that allows you to happily function.</li>
</ul>
<h2>Turn extra square footage into income with Neighbor</h2>
<p>Do you have a little more square footage than you (or your family) need?</p>
<p>You can help out a neighbor and earn some extra income on the side by renting out a closet, a room, an attic, or another unused space with <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=header&amp;utm_medium=headerlogo">Neighbor</a>.</p>
<p>Neighbor connects people with extra space with people who need safe, secure storage for extra belongings. In the process, we’re bringing people and neighborhoods closer together.</p>
<p>Ready to use your spare square footage to help out a neighbor? <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/host">List your space today</a>.</p>
<h4>Storage Guides</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-size-guide/">Storage Unit Size Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-costs/">Average Monthly Storage Unit Costs</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/types-of-storage-units/">Types of Storage Units</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-unit-insurance-guide/">Storage Unit Insurance Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">How to Calculate Square Footage</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/square-footage/">Square Footage: How to Calculate It, How Much You Need, and More</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>The Homeowner’s Guide to Outdoor Pipe Insulation and Winterization</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/homeowners-guide-to-outdoor-pipe-insulation/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/homeowners-guide-to-outdoor-pipe-insulation/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Wed, 23 Dec 2020 19:00:01 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winter guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winterizing]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6897</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>As a homeowner, you have an important responsibility to winterize your home and outdoor features. Similar to the way you winterize your lawnmower, your car, your home, and other important possessions that will be subject to harsh winter weather, there are ways to protect your home. Outdoor pipe insulation is one important task that can [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/homeowners-guide-to-outdoor-pipe-insulation/">The Homeowner’s Guide to Outdoor Pipe Insulation and Winterization</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>As a homeowner, you have an important responsibility to winterize your home and outdoor features. Similar to the way you winterize your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">lawnmower</a>, your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">car</a>, your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">home</a>, and other important possessions that will be subject to harsh winter weather, there are ways to protect your home. Outdoor pipe insulation is one important task that can provide protection for your home and help you avoid potentially expensive damage and repairs. This guide to outdoor pipe insulation will help you understand the effects of freezing temperatures on your water pipes and how to prevent the damage ice can cause.</p>
<h2>How Do Freezing Temperatures Damage Your Pipes?</h2>
<p>Freezing temperatures can cause severe damage to your water pipes. As water freezes in your pipes, the material expands. Even when pipes don&#8217;t burst, they can be weakened by freezing. These are a few ways winter weather can damage your plumbing:</p>
<ul>
<li>Ice stretches and weakens water lines, making them more likely to leak.</li>
<li>Outdoor faucets freeze, and the mechanisms inside break, so they fail to work next spring.</li>
<li>Leaky faucets and valves often result from freezing and thawing.</li>
<li>Ice freezes in pipes and the water that builds up behind the blockage can burst long sections of water pipes, flooding your home.</li>
<li>Uninsulated drain pipes under your home can lead to ice in the lines and sewage back up.</li>
<li>Your home will develop leaks in your ceiling or attic from damage due to uninsulated pipes or even <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/insulate-attic-ultimate-guide/">uninsulated attic walls</a>.</li>
</ul>
<p>While you&#8217;re likely familiar with the valves and faucets you use to run your garden hoses and sprinkler system, there are likely many pipes that connect to your indoor plumbing system that you might not be familiar with. Learning how to locate these important pipes and install the correct outdoor pipe insulation can help you avoid potential damage to your home.</p>
<h2>Outdoor Pipe Insulation Types</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6900" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/A-faucet-cover-on-a-spigot-along-a-homes-exterior-wall.jpg" alt="A faucet cover on a spigot along a home's exterior wall" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Your plumbing system uses a variety of pipes and working components in different shapes and sizes. You might find that a variety of types of outdoor pipe insulation and other insulation items are necessary to prepare your outdoor plumbing system for the winter season. Some of the most common plumbing insulation products come from major brands, like Frost King and ArmaFlex tubes created by Armacell. Consider any or all of these outdoor plumbing insulation types to complete your outdoor pipe insulation project.</p>
<ul>
<li>Faucet Insulators or Outdoor Faucet Covers</li>
<li>Foam Insulation Tape</li>
<li>Polyethylene Pipe Insulation (foam pipe covers)</li>
<li>Fiberglass Pipe Insulation</li>
<li>Rubber Insulation</li>
</ul>
<h2>Your Complete Guide to Outdoor Pipe Insulation</h2>
<p>All outdoor pipes that are exposed or partially exposed to freezing temperatures are subject to damage. Locating these elements and providing high-quality outdoor pipe insulation is the best way to protect your pipes from freezing and bursting when harsh winter temperatures arrive.</p>
<p>If you&#8217;ve recently moved to an area that experiences significantly colder temperatures than you&#8217;re accustomed to, then ask for help. Your plumber or local home improvement store clerk can tell you more about local water pipe insulation tips and what R-value — or insulative value — your pipes need. Follow these steps to complete the process:</p>
<h3>1. Drain and Store Garden Hoses</h3>
<p>You&#8217;re unlikely to be using your garden hoses when it&#8217;s freezing outside, and exposing them to harsh winter weather can damage or destroy hoses. Instead, you should drain and store your garden hoses in the garage, shed, or basement.</p>
<p>Take these easy steps to prepare your garden hose for winter.</p>
<ul>
<li>Disconnect your water hose from the outdoor water supply.</li>
<li>Uncoil the hose and stretch it along the ground.</li>
<li>Allow the water to drain completely from the hose.</li>
<li>Roll up the hose and store it in a safe place for the winter.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Outdoor Pipe Insulation Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>While you allow your hose to drain, take a walk around your yard to locate other items like lawn decorations and outdoor furniture that should be stored away for the winter.</p></blockquote>
<h3>2. Drain the Outdoor Faucets</h3>
<p>Your outdoor faucets can harbor trace amounts of water, leading to freezing and damage when temperatures drop in the winter. To prevent potentially expensive damage, you&#8217;ll need to eliminate all water from these outdoor faucets. While outdoor plumbing systems vary, the process is mostly the same. Follow these steps to drain your outdoor faucets for the winter.</p>
<ul>
<li>Turn off the water supply to your outdoor faucets. Some homes have an interior shut-off valve located inside your home. Otherwise, you should have a shut-off valve located on the line that feeds the faucet (often located in the crawlspace or basement).</li>
<li>Drain the excess water at the shut-off. Place a bucket under the shut-off drain cap. Then open the drain cap and allow all excess water to drain out.</li>
<li>Drain the exterior faucet. Leave the drain cap open and go outside to the exterior faucet. Turn on the exterior faucet and wait for it to dry out.</li>
<li>Finish up. When the water is completely drained, turn off the faucet and close the drain cap.</li>
</ul>
<h3>3. Insulate Exposed Pipes and Working Components</h3>
<p>Now that all water is drained and the removable hoses are safely stored for the winter, it&#8217;s essential to take care of the portions of your outdoor plumbing system that will still be exposed to the weather. This is where your outdoor pipe insulation supplies come in handy. Take these steps to insulate your exposed pipes and outdoor faucets against freezing temperatures.</p>
<ul>
<li>Locate exposed pipes and wrap them with self-sealing insulation tubes. For hard to reach areas or elbows, you may need to apply additional wrap insulation or foam insulation tape.</li>
<li>A fitted insulation cover can protect faucets or hose bibs. For the best results, you should make sure the cover fits properly and has a way to keep it secured in place.</li>
</ul>
<p>Repeat these steps until every exposed pipe and fitting is covered.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Outdoor Pipe Insulation Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>In extremely cold areas, these measures may not be completely adequate. You may also need to install an indoor shut-off valve if your home doesn&#8217;t already have one.</p></blockquote>
<h3>4. Insulate Water Supply Lines</h3>
<p>The water lines that supply water to your home are often located in an <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">unfinished garage</a> or basement, near exterior walls, and in the crawl space beneath your house. While many of these lines may not be considered exterior plumbing lines, they are often exposed to outdoor temperatures because they&#8217;re located near uninsulated exterior walls or under your home in the basement or crawl space.</p>
<p>Insulating these supply lines can help you avoid the most common winter plumbing issues faced by homeowners each year. Besides avoiding ice blockages in the supply lines and burst pipes, insulating supply lines can provide other benefits. For instance, adding insulation to hot water pipes can lower your energy costs because your water heater won&#8217;t have to work as hard during the winter. Insulating cold water lines will also eliminate condensation.</p>
<p>Take these steps to insulate your water supply lines:</p>
<h4>Find the Pipes</h4>
<p>Locate any pipes that run through unheated spaces like your crawl space, unfinished basement, and exterior walls.</p>
<h4>Choose Your Methods of Insulation and Insulation Material</h4>
<p>You can insulate all pipes in exterior walls with wall insulation. Pre-slit foam pipe sleeves are a simple way to cover long straight lines. Gaps where pipes penetrate walls can be insulated with foam insulation products that expand when applied to fill the gap or foam caulk rope.</p>
<h4>Secure Insulation With Additional Tape or Glue</h4>
<p>Foam pipe insulation sleeves are often pre-cut with a slit that runs length-wise down the sleeve. The slit may include a self-adhesive strip for closure. If not, then you may need to apply tape or glue to seal the seam. Ensure all exposed pipes are completely enclosed with pipe wrap insulation to avoid ice in the lines.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Outdoor Pipe Insulation Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>In very cold climates, you may want to consider installing frost-proof outdoor faucets. While they do not insulate, they contain a special valve to eliminate all water from inside the faucet.</p></blockquote>
<p>Insulating your outdoor pipes and the supply lines to your water system can help you avoid a winter catastrophe. Learning about DIY outdoor pipe insulation can also help you increase your home repair knowledge and extend the life of your plumbing system. Remember to inspect your home&#8217;s insulation each year to ensure it hasn&#8217;t sustained damage and you still have the protection you need against the elements. If you have an in-ground sprinkler system, you can also protect your plumbing by winterizing the sprinklers.</p>
<h2>Additional Winterization Resources</h2>
<p><ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul><br />
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/homeowners-guide-to-outdoor-pipe-insulation/">The Homeowner’s Guide to Outdoor Pipe Insulation and Winterization</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Winterize a Sprinkler System: An Essential Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 22 Dec 2020 19:00:54 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[gardening and landscaping]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[lawn care]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winter guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winterizing]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6890</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Your sprinkler system helps you maintain a lush green lawn and healthy garden during the growing seasons. Before the first freeze arrives, it&#8217;s essential to learn how to winterize your sprinkler system or call in a technician to take care of the job for you. While many professional landscaping companies can manage this job for [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System: An Essential Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Your sprinkler system helps you maintain a lush green lawn and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-to-los-angeles-urban-farming-and-starting-an-urban-garden/">healthy garden</a> during the growing seasons. Before the first freeze arrives, it&#8217;s essential to learn how to winterize your sprinkler system or call in a technician to take care of the job for you. While many professional landscaping companies can manage this job for a fee, it&#8217;s a task you can complete yourself with the right tools and knowledge. When you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">prepare your landscaping tools for winter</a>, it&#8217;s time to winterize your sprinkler system, too. Follow this handy guide to learn how to winterize a sprinkler system.</p>
<h2>Supplies for Winterizing Your Sprinklers</h2>
<p>Depending on the method you use and the type of sprinkler system you own, you&#8217;ll need certain tools to successfully winterize your sprinkler system. It&#8217;s essential to always make safety a priority and use the right tools to avoid damage to your sprinkler system. Gather these supplies before you decide how to winterize your sprinkler system.</p>
<ul>
<li>Safety Glasses</li>
<li>Pliers</li>
<li>Foam Insulating Tape</li>
<li>Foam Pipe Covers</li>
<li>Air Compressor</li>
</ul>
<h2>How to Winterize a Sprinkler System: Your Step-by-Step Guide to Three Common Methods</h2>
<p>The method you choose for how to winterize a sprinkler system depends on the type of system you own. If you&#8217;re not sure what type of sprinkler system you have, then contact a professional to come to your property for an inspection.</p>
<p>The three most common processes are:</p>
<ol>
<li>Draining manual valves</li>
<li>Draining automatic valves</li>
<li>Sprinkler blowout</li>
</ol>
<p>Once you know what type you have, use one of these methods to winterize your sprinkler system:</p>
<h3>How to Winterize a Sprinkler System With Manual Drain Valves</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6893" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Someone-manually-opening-sprinkler-heads-before-starting-to-drain-them.jpg" alt="Someone manually opening sprinkler heads before starting to drain them" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Some irrigation systems use manual valves to eliminate water from the system. These systems work by opening valves that are located at the lowest end of the system. If your sprinkler has manual valves, then follow these steps for winterization:</p>
<ul>
<li>Shut off the supply of water to the system. If your system also has a backflow preventer, turn it off, too.</li>
<li>Locate the manual valves located at the low points and ends of the piping.</li>
<li>Open all the valves and drain all water from the system.</li>
<li>If your system has check valves (which are designed to allow water to go only one way), then raise your sprinkler heads to let water drain from the valves.</li>
<li>To ensure all water is drained between the shut-off valve and backflow device, your system may have a boiler drain valve or a stop and waste valve. Open the drain cap and open this valve to drain the remaining water from the system.</li>
<li>When all water has drained from the system, close all the manual valves.</li>
</ul>
<h3>How to Drain Water From a Sprinkler System With Automatic Drain Valves</h3>
<p>Sprinkler systems with automatic valves are designed to dispel water if the pressure falls below a certain point. This type of system makes draining a little easier, but you&#8217;ll still need to manually drain water from the valves. Take these steps to drain water from your sprinkler system with automatic valves:</p>
<ul>
<li>Turn off all water to the system.</li>
<li>Run one of the sprinkler heads to release water pressure from the system.</li>
<li>To release the water trapped in the valves, locate the valve solenoid on each valve and manually loosen them. This will allow air to flow inside the system and allow water to drain into the mainline.</li>
<li>Drain any remaining water between the shut-off valve and backflow device by locating the boiler drain valve or stop and waste valve. Open the drain cap and loosen the valve to drain all water left in the system.</li>
</ul>
<h3>The Blow-Out Method of How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</h3>
<p>This method uses compressed air to blow moisture out of the system. This is usually a final step taken after draining is complete for either type of sprinkler system. It&#8217;s important to note that a blow-out is often completed by a professional to ensure all water is removed from the system. If you have an air compressor with a cubic foot per minute (CFM) rating of 80 to 100, it is possible to complete a sprinkler system blowout yourself.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Sprinkler System:</h4>
<p>Using compressed air can be dangerous and result in significant injury. If you&#8217;re planning a DIY sprinkler system blow-out, then wear eye protection throughout the process and avoid standing over pipes, sprinklers, and valves. But if you aren&#8217;t accustomed to using an air compressor or you&#8217;re not sure if yours is properly rated, then leave this step to the professionals.</p></blockquote>
<p>Learning how to winterize a sprinkler system with an air compressor involves a specific process you must follow carefully. To complete a DIY sprinkler system blow-out, follow these steps:</p>
<ol>
<li>If you haven&#8217;t manually drained the water from your system, then turn off the water supply to the system.</li>
<li>With the air compressor valve in the closed position, attach the air hose to the coupling that fits your system.</li>
<li>Locate the valve furthest from the compressor and at the highest point and turn it on.</li>
<li>Close the backflow valves.</li>
<li>Slowly open the valve on the air compressor. Add air gradually, ensuring you never exceed the recommended pressure for the lowest pressure rated component on the zone, and never exceed 80 PSI.</li>
<li>Stop the airflow and close the valve when the spray of water stops.</li>
<li>Work your way through the system by completing the blow-out process on each valve. Start with the furthest valve, and finish with the valve closest to the air compressor.</li>
<li>After completely draining all the valves, disconnect the air compressor and release any pressure left in the system.</li>
<li>Open and close the valves on the backflow device to eliminate air pressure from the backflow device.</li>
</ol>
<h2>Complete the Winterization Process</h2>
<p>After the water is completely drained from your system, it&#8217;s important to protect the components of your sprinkler system that will be exposed to freezing temperatures. Follow these final steps of how to winterize your sprinkler system&#8217;s exposed parts.</p>
<h3>Insulate Above-Ground Components</h3>
<p>Any exposed parts of your sprinkler system, including pipes, backflow preventers, and main shut off valves, should be insulated against freezing temperatures. Without blocking drainage ports or valves, use foam insulating tape and pipe covers to protect working parts against freezing and cracking.</p>
<h3>Check Your Owner&#8217;s Manual for Specific Instructions</h3>
<p>Some sprinkler systems require that you store some removable parts indoors during freezing weather. Consult your manual to learn if you should disconnect the valves and cap off pipes for the winter.</p>
<h3>After That, Turn off Your Programmable Timer</h3>
<p>If your system is on a timer, then you&#8217;ll need to shut it off for the winter and reprogram it in the spring. Alternatively, if your system has a rain mode, then you can use it to override the sprinklers without losing your programmed settings.</p>
<h2>How Much Does It Cost to Have My Sprinkler System Professionally Winterized?</h2>
<p>The cost to have your system winterized professionally typically ranges from $40 to over $200, with <a href="https://www.kompareit.com/homeandgarden/winter-winterize-sprinkler-system.html#:~:text=Summary%3A%20Average%20Cost%20to%20Blow,maximum%20reported%20cost%20was%20%24250." target="_blank">a national average of $81</a>. It&#8217;s important to remember that this cost likely comes with a guarantee your system will be protected against freezing for the winter. You might be able to get a discount from a local professional servicing several yards in the same area.</p>
<p>You can expect a professional winterization to include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Shutting off the main water supply</li>
<li>Draining the backflow preventer</li>
<li>Completely draining or blowing out of all water in the system</li>
<li>Removal of the fertilizer or rust-blocker injection system</li>
<li>Shutdown of the timing system</li>
</ul>
<p>If you need assistance reprogramming your system next spring, then you may face an additional fee.</p>
<p>If you don&#8217;t understand how to winterize a sprinkler system yourself, calling a professional is essential to keeping your sprinkler system in working order. The cost of having your sprinkler system winterized is only a fraction of the price of potential repairs if parts of your system are damaged due to freezing weather.</p>
<p>Winterizing your lawn sprinkler system will help you avoid damage from water freezing within the system, and it’s an essential part of <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">winterizing your home</a>. Protecting the working parts of your sprinkler system can help you avoid the cost of additional repairs. It can also extend the life of your sprinkler system. Once you learn how to winterize a sprinkler system yourself, it&#8217;s a task you can easily take care of each year.</p>
<h2>Additional Winterization Resources</h2>
<p><ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul><br />
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System: An Essential Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Clean a Glass Stovetop</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-glass-stovetop/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-glass-stovetop/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 17 Dec 2020 19:00:02 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[chores]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[cleaning guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how]]></category>
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		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6865</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Smooth glass stovetops are great appliances. But even small specks or spills can stand out on the surface. What&#8217;s even worse is, if you do not keep the surface spotless, those food particles can burn to the stovetop, making it look old and dirty. Getting that showroom shine back requires a little bit more than [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-glass-stovetop/">How to Clean a Glass Stovetop</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Smooth glass stovetops are great appliances. But even small specks or spills can stand out on the surface. What&#8217;s even worse is, if you do not keep the surface spotless, those food particles can burn to the stovetop, making it look old and dirty. Getting that showroom shine back requires a little bit more than elbow grease. If you have a glass stovetop oven or are considering buying one, here is how to clean a glass stovetop to keep your kitchen in <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/organize-your-kitchen-5-simple-steps-to-get-started/">tip-top shape</a>. This guide will walk you through daily, weekly, and deep cleaning steps.</p>
<h2>Basic Cleaning Tips for How to Clean a Glass Stovetop</h2>
<p>To start, the best way on how to clean a glass stovetop is to wipe it down after each use. To prevent grime from becoming a larger issue, all you need is a microfiber cloth and some white vinegar and water. <a href="https://www.thekitchn.com/what-is-vinegar-and-what-makes-it-a-good-cleaner-236459" target="_blank">Vinegar is a powerful cleaning solution</a>. You can use it to clean up anything from stains to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-mold-ultimate-guide/">mold</a>, grease, and more.</p>
<p>The first thing you want to do is mix a solution of equal parts vinegar and water. Gently dab the cloth in the solution. Then, thoroughly wipe the surface in a circular motion, making sure you get all the spots.</p>
<p>We understand that most individuals are busy, and taking the time to wipe down your glass stovetop after each use can be a hassle, especially in the morning. Fortunately, there are other ways for how to clean a glass stovetop.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>When cleaning, avoid using abrasive cleaners like a scouring brush, a scrubbing pad, or anything with rough bristles or grainy textures. Since glass stovetops are smooth surfaces, these items can leave behind little scratches and dings that make your stovetop lose its shine.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Weekly Cleaning Tips for How to Clean Glass Stovetops</h2>
<p>If you had a busy week and forget to wipe down your glass cooktop, don&#8217;t worry! There is still an easy way to get the residue off. Remember, stains form quickly on the surface, so you will need a more thorough cleaning method this time around. Here is how to clean a glass stovetop each week:</p>
<ol>
<li>The first thing you want to do is make sure your stovetop is off and completely cool.</li>
<li>Next, you want to use a white vinegar spray bottle and generously spray the surface. If you do not have a white vinegar spray, you can easily find quality cleaning products on Amazon.</li>
<li>Then, go to your utility closet and find some baking soda. Generously sprinkle the baking soda on top of the vinegar to spot treat hard stains.</li>
<li>Once the baking soda is set, grab a soft towel and soak it in hot water. Wring it out, and put it on top of the baking soda and white vinegar mix.</li>
<li>Now, sit back and let the mixture work its magic. You want to leave the towel on top for 10-15 minutes.</li>
<li>Once the time has passed, remove the damp cloth and use a microfiber cloth to wipe away the residue.</li>
</ol>
<p>You can also spray more vinegar afterward to wipe away any streaks. However, if it has been a couple of weeks since you last cleaned your oven and this method does not make your glass stovetop look new, then you may need to resort to deep cleaning.</p>
<h2>DIY Deep Cleaning Tips</h2>
<p>Sometimes you cannot remove baked-on splatter and grime with a daily or weekly cleaning method. If you are at this point, set aside an hour or so to ensure you can complete the whole job. Deep cleaning your glass stovetop is the most labor-intensive cleaning method. Here is how to clean a glass stovetop in seven easy steps:</p>
<h3>Step 1: Wipe Down the Surface With White Vinegar</h3>
<p>The first thing you want to do in the deep cleaning process is to wipe down your glass stovetop with white vinegar. Although a vinegar wash will not remove those pesky stuck-on stains, it will remove more recent ones and make the subsequent cleaning process much easier. Just like before, do not forget to turn off your stove. It should be completely cool before you start the cleaning process.</p>
<h3>Step 2: Use a Cleaning Solution or Powder to Remove Burned-On Stains</h3>
<p>Do you need to know how to clean a glass stovetop with a lot of nasty burned-on stains on your glass stovetop? If so, then powders and pastes like Bar Keepers Friend are a great cleaning solution choice. That particular brand is a popular cleaning product, so you could probably find it at your local Walmart or convenience store.</p>
<p>To start, you can either sprinkle the cleaning powder directly on the surface or make a paste out of it by mixing it with water. Let the cleanser sit for a couple of minutes, then wipe the surface clean with a damp microfiber cloth. You may have to repeat the process a couple of times to remove the stains. However, if you cannot remove the stains, you may have to resort to stronger cleaning methods. We cover these in steps 3 and 4.</p>
<h3>Step 3: Combine Baking Soda With Dish Soap and Hydrogen Peroxide to Tackle the Toughest Stains</h3>
<p>If it has been a while since you last cleaned your glass stovetop, there may be some stubborn stains that will be quite difficult to remove. The best way on how to clean a glass stovetop with pesky stains is through a combination of baking soda, dish soap, and hydrogen peroxide.</p>
<p>First, you want to disperse dawn dish soap on the surface evenly. Then, cover the surface with baking soda. Lastly, add a few tablespoons of hydrogen peroxide and let the concoction sit for a couple of minutes. After some time has passed, grab a dish scrubber with soft, fine bristles and thoroughly scrub the entire surface. You may need to dedicate more time to specific areas heavily affected by grime and gunk. However, if you still cannot remove some of those stains, move on to step 4. If your glass stovetop is looking good, then go ahead and move on to step 5.</p>
<h3>Step 4: Use A Razor Scraper</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6868" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Hand-holding-a-razor-scraper-and-removing-stuck-stains.jpg" alt="Hand holding a razor scraper and removing stuck stains" width="1256" height="835" /></p>
<p>No matter how hard you try, some stains cannot be removed by traditional cleaning products. If this is the case, you want to use a handheld razor blade to scrape off the remaining stains. If you&#8217;ve had to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-charcoal-grill/">clean a charcoal grill</a> with a razor scraper before, many of the safety tips are the same.</p>
<p>However, before you start, check the manufacturer&#8217;s care guidelines. Sometimes companies caution against using razor blades to scrape stains off the surface. You can generally find these instructions in the product handbook, or a quick Google search works just as well.</p>
<p>Follow these steps:</p>
<ol>
<li>Spray the impacted area with white vinegar.</li>
<li>Hold the razorblade as flat as possible against the stove and begin to gently scrape away at the grime.</li>
<li>Provide uniform pressure on the razor blade during the process.</li>
<li>Avoid using the corners of the blade to minimize the risk of scratching the glass.</li>
</ol>
<p>After you successfully scrape away a stain, wipe down the area with a microfiber cloth to remove the material. Repeat the process until you remove all stains. Once completed, you can move on to the next step.</p>
<h3>Step 5: Use a Glass Cleaner and Cloth to Clear the Surface</h3>
<p>Once you remove all of the stains, you can finish the cleaning process by spraying the surface with a glass cleaner and wiping it down with a microfiber cloth. Microfiber fabrics are smooth and soft (so you do not have to worry about it leaving scratches), and they make the surface area streak-free. Likewise, they are cheap, and you can find them at your local grocery store. After you do a quick scrub, clean up the work area, and marvel at your fresh glass countertop.</p>
<h3>Optional: Polish the Surface to Give It a Showroom Shine</h3>
<p>If you already went through the entire process of deep cleaning your glass stovetop oven, you can add some polish to give it that showroom shine. This is perfect for when you have guests coming over. There are countless different countertop polishes you could use and find online. If you have some polish around the house, then put some on. However, this step is entirely optional.</p>
<p>If you decide to add some polish, all you have to do is dampen a microfiber cloth with some paste, rub it evenly on the surface, and let dry.</p>
<p>Now that you know how to clean a glass stovetop, the best thing you can do is to try and clean it as regularly as possible. Under no circumstances should cleaning your glass stovetop be an annual occurrence likes your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-spring-cleaning-decluttering-deep-cleaning-guide/#">spring cleaning regimen</a>. Deep cleaning can be a tedious chore, so give it a wipe-down regularly to keep your kitchen sparkling clean all year long.</p>
<h2>Additional Cleaning Resources</h2>
<p><ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-car-seats-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean Car Seats</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-mattress-a-complete-guide/">How to Clean a Mattress</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-fish-tank/">How to Clean a Fish Tank</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/clean-wood-furniture/">How to Clean Wood Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/outdoor-furniture-cleaning/">How to Clean your Outdoor Patio and Lawn Furniture</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/spring-cleaning-list/">Spring Cleaning List</a></li>
</ul><br />
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-glass-stovetop/">How to Clean a Glass Stovetop</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>The Ultimate Guide to How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Wed, 16 Dec 2020 19:00:54 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
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		<category><![CDATA[winter guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winterizing]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6855</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Through the spring, summer, and fall, you enjoyed amazing adventures in your camper. As the traditional camping season draws to a close and winter arrives, however, you may have already decided that winter camping isn&#8217;t for you. To make sure that your camper is ready to use again when spring comes around again, you need [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">The Ultimate Guide to How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Through the spring, summer, and fall, you enjoyed amazing adventures in your camper. As the traditional camping season draws to a close and winter arrives, however, you may have already decided that winter camping isn&#8217;t for you. To make sure that your camper is ready to use again when spring comes around again, you need to know how to winterize a camper and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rv-storage?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=footer&amp;utm_medium=footerlinks">prepare it for storage</a>. Make sure you follow these critical steps to ensure that your camper is safe and protected through the winter months.</p>
<p>What are the steps for how to winterize a camper? The basic checklist includes these steps:</p>
<ol>
<li>Drain and Clean Your Water Tanks</li>
<li>Drain Your Water Lines and Hot Water Heater</li>
<li>Winterize Your Plumbing System</li>
<li>Wash Out the Sewer Hose</li>
<li>Clean Out Your Camper Completely</li>
<li>Empty the Refrigerator</li>
<li>Unplug All the Electronics</li>
<li>Make Sure Your Propane Is No Longer Connected</li>
<li>Seal All the Gaps</li>
<li>Clean the Awning</li>
<li>Wash and Wax Your Trailer to Have It Looking Its Best</li>
<li>Choose the Right Location for Your Camper</li>
<li>Tuck Your Camper in for the Winter</li>
</ol>
<h2>What&#8217;s the Difference Between an RV and a Camper?</h2>
<p>An RV and a camper are incredibly similar since both can help RVers have adventures with their family while bringing a little piece of home along for the ride. Typically, however, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">an RV is its own vehicle and requires its own winterization checklist</a>. But a camper is dragged behind a truck or other large vehicle. Some common types of campers include:</p>
<h3>General Campers</h3>
<p>Campers, in general, are trailers attached behind a vehicle. These large trailers have space for sleeping and cooking.</p>
<h3>Travel Trailers</h3>
<p>Travel trailers are designed to offer more room for sleeping and storage. When you think of living on the road, you might be imagining life in a travel trailer.</p>
<h3>Pop-Up Trailers</h3>
<p>Pop-up trailers fold down into a much smaller size for easier hauling, thanks to the canvas construction of some of the walls. They often do not contain as many amenities as a full-size camper.</p>
<p>This guide is about how to winterize a camper, specifically, which is different from other recreational vehicles and structures.</p>
<h2>What to Do Before You Start Winterizing Your Camper</h2>
<p>Before getting started on the process of how to winterize a camper, schedule any needed maintenance. This is a great time to fix any problems you might have had throughout the seasons since you won&#8217;t need your travel trailer again until camping season swings around again. This is also a great time to:</p>
<ul>
<li>Schedule having a professional put in a water heater bypass kit or a water pump converter kit.</li>
<li>Take care of any upgrades.</li>
<li>Have your camper evaluated.</li>
</ul>
<h2>How to Winterize a Camper</h2>
<h3>Step One: Drain and Clean Your Water Tanks</h3>
<p>Your camper holds two key water disposal tanks: one for black water, which contains human waste and cannot be safely reused for any other purpose, and one for gray water, which contains all the runoff from your showers and your sink. It will also have a fresh water tank or holding tank for unused water.</p>
<p>Start the process of how to winterize a camper by draining these tanks completely before the end of the season arrives. You&#8217;ll need to plan to clean them out with a special black water tank cleaner and cleaning wand. Keep in mind that both black and grey water tanks can contain bacteria, which could breed over the winter and create a toxic mess if you don&#8217;t clean them out properly. Liquid left in those tanks, like any other water in your camper, can also freeze, causing its own set of problems.</p>
<h3>Step Two: Drain the Water Lines and Hot Water Heater</h3>
<p>Once you&#8217;ve cleaned out the black and gray water tanks and cleaned out your wastewater, you&#8217;ll need to clean out your water lines and hot water heater. Since you probably will not have the heater running or power going in your camper over the winter, drain the lines. If you leave water in them, they could freeze and even burst, leaving you with an expensive mess to clean up when spring arrives. Instead, make sure they are all drained completely.</p>
<p>You should not drain the water heater while it&#8217;s hot or under pressure. Instead, you should turn everything off, wait for it to cool down, and then open the drain plug at the bottom of the tank. You don&#8217;t want hot water coming out of the drain! Allow it to empty completely.</p>
<p>Then, make sure you&#8217;ve turned off your water pump, and open all of your faucets. Leave the faucets open while the water slows to a trickle then disappears. This simple step will help ensure that no water remains in your water system while you&#8217;re winterizing your camper.</p>
<p>While you&#8217;re draining and protecting your camper water system, make sure you drain and empty your washing machine, drain the outside shower, and check your dishwasher. The key goal behind many of the steps of how to winterize a camper is removing all possible traces of fluid. You don&#8217;t want anything remaining in the water lines as freezing temperatures hit.</p>
<h3>Step Three: Winterize Your Camper Plumbing System</h3>
<p>When it comes to your motorhome&#8217;s water system, you have two choices for winterizing: <a href="https://medium.com/how-to-self-service-your-car/how-does-antifreeze-work-9e3550b21cda" target="_blank">antifreeze</a>, or compressed air. Both methods will help protect your pipes against freezing throughout the winter. Each one has its own advantages and disadvantages.</p>
<h4>How to Use Antifreeze to Winterize Your Camper&#8217;s Plumbing System</h4>
<p>Antifreeze can help prevent your lines from freezing and ensure that any fresh water remaining in your water system will not freeze and leave you with a serious mess over the winter months. Before you add antifreeze, make sure you bypass the water heater: if antifreeze makes it into the water heater, it can cause damage and even result in the need to replace it.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Camper:</h4>
<p>Some campers come with a water heater bypass already installed. If you don&#8217;t know whether or not yours has one, make sure you check with a professional before adding antifreeze! If yours does not have one, a water heater bypass kit, also known as a bypass valve, can ensure that you can protect your travel trailer for the winter.</p></blockquote>
<p>Make sure you buy non-toxic camper or RV antifreeze since it will need to be a special grade to ensure the integrity of your camper. On average, you will need two to three gallons of antifreeze to effectively winterize your system.</p>
<p>Turn off all the water faucets and make sure your water heater is turned off, too. Then, add antifreeze to the tank and, one by one, turn on all of your faucets until you see antifreeze. While the faucets remain open, open the city water inlet, remove the screen, and apply mild pressure to the soft screen with a screwdriver. Once you see coolant, you can replace the screen and cover.</p>
<p>While you&#8217;re working on your cold water lines, pour a little antifreeze down the drains, too. Once you&#8217;re done, make sure all of the faucets are fully closed and that the heating element of the water heater is turned off. The antifreeze will help protect your plumbing system throughout the winter months.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Camper:</h4>
<p>If you use antifreeze to winterize your camper&#8217;s plumbing system, keep in mind that you will have to blow out the antifreeze again at the end of the winter or before you use water in the camper again.</p></blockquote>
<h4>How to Use Compressed Air to Winterize Your Motorhome&#8217;s Plumbing System</h4>
<p>Your plumbing system is one of the most important parts of your camper to consider during the winterizing process — and compressed air will certainly help you do the job. Not only can it prove less expensive than using antifreeze, but you also won&#8217;t have to worry about having to blow out the antifreeze before the next season. Follow these steps:</p>
<h5>1. Make sure you have the right materials on hand for how to winterize a camper plumbing system.</h5>
<p>To winterize your camper&#8217;s plumbing system with fresh air, you will need:</p>
<ul>
<li>An air compressor</li>
<li>An adjustable pressure regulator (an important element of your air compressor)</li>
<li>A blow out plug that fits into the city water inlet of your camper</li>
</ul>
<h5>2. Make sure you&#8217;ve already flushed and drained your black and gray water tanks.</h5>
<p>You don&#8217;t want to proceed with this part of the process until those tanks are empty and clean. If you planned to skip that part of the process, you may want to go back and make sure your black water tank and gray water tank are empty.</p>
<h5>3. Drain the fresh water system, if you haven&#8217;t already.</h5>
<p>Make sure you have opened all exterior low point drains, in addition to opening all of your faucets and showerheads. The toilet pedal can also help flush additional water out of the system. Only when you have removed as much water as possible from the system should you progress with your compressed air winterization. You should also:</p>
<ul>
<li>Make sure the water pump has been drained.</li>
<li>Remove any inline water filters.</li>
<li>Check the water heater to make sure that it&#8217;s been drained.</li>
<li>Turn on or install the bypass valve for your water heater, if needed.</li>
</ul>
<h5>4. Attach the air compressor to the city water inlet on your camper.</h5>
<p>Use the blow out plug and make sure that you have a solid fit. Once you have attached the air compressor, turn it on. Limit the pressure to a maximum of 40 psi. Too much pressure could cause you to inadvertently damage internal travel trailer parts, including your water lines.</p>
<h5>5. Open each hot and cold faucet and water fixture one at a time.</h5>
<p>Starting with the fixtures closet to the air compressor and working your way around the camper, open each water fixture and watch water splutter out until only air gets released from the faucets. Close each one when you&#8217;re done. Make sure to open:</p>
<ul>
<li>Hot water settings</li>
<li>Cold water settings</li>
<li>The showerhead</li>
<li>The toilet sprayer</li>
<li>The toilet, which you should flush until you have removed all water from the system</li>
</ul>
<h5>6. Turn off the compressor.</h5>
<p>You can go ahead and disconnect the compressor and put it away when you&#8217;re done.</p>
<h5>7. Use a little antifreeze.</h5>
<p>While you won&#8217;t need to use as much antifreeze as if you were planning to use it as your primary winterization method, you should pour about a cup of antifreeze into:</p>
<ul>
<li>Shower drains</li>
<li>Sink drains</li>
<li>The toilet</li>
</ul>
<h5>8. Remove all low point drain plugs.</h5>
<p>Don&#8217;t forget the water heater drain plug! Taking out the drain plugs will ensure that no water remains in the system, where it could sit or freeze over the winter months.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Camper:</h4>
<p>You can&#8217;t expect to get every drop of water out of your system using compressed air. Plan to use a cup of antifreeze per water fixture to prevent any remaining water from freezing and causing problems for your camper over the winter.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Step Four: Wash Out the Sewer Hose</h3>
<p>In addition to washing out the tanks and flushing out the system, make sure you wash out the sewer hose! Many camper owners choose to keep the sewer hose stored outside the vehicle, and you may forget to clean it, especially if you&#8217;re hurrying through the process of how to winterize a camper. Make sure you wash out the sewer hose to prevent bacteria from building up and growing over the winter months.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Camper:</h4>
<p>Consider connecting one end of the hose to the other to form a loop while storing it for the winter. This will help protect your camper by keeping the hose sanitary and contained throughout the winter months.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Step Five: Clean Out Your Camper Completely</h3>
<p>Once you&#8217;ve taken care of winterizing your motorhome&#8217;s water system, you should take steps to ensure that it&#8217;s prepared for the winter in other ways, too.</p>
<p>During the winter months, chances are, you won&#8217;t be in your camper at all. That could mean that you would miss thieves or vandals breaking in. If you have any valuables in your camper, now is the time to remove them! Don&#8217;t forget <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/store-jewelry-3-key-considerations/">jewelry </a>and other expensive items. You should also:</p>
<ul>
<li>Strip all of the beds</li>
<li>Wash all sheets and blankets</li>
<li>Remove all food from the cabinets, including nonperishable items or kitchen staples.</li>
<li>Make sure that you&#8217;ve removed any important or sentimental items that you might use for the rest of the year. Also, remove anything that could be damaged over the winter — <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-store-photographs/">photographs</a>, for example.</li>
</ul>
<p>Even canned goods should be removed from the camper during the winter to prevent freezing. Empty the cabinets and shelves and start from scratch when spring arrives and you&#8217;re ready to go camping again.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Camper:</h4>
<p>Cockroaches can survive in temperatures of 15 degrees Fahrenheit, which means they could creep into your camper if you leave anything that will attract them over the winter months. Removing all bedding and curtains (as well as all food particles) will help protect your camper during the winter.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Step Six: Empty the Refrigerator</h3>
<p>The last thing you want to do is open your camper in the spring, only to notice a foul smell or, worse, bugs coming from the refrigerator. While many pests do die off in winter, some bugs only die off in extreme temperatures. To keep your camper in the best possible condition during the winter months, remove anything that could tempt bugs and other small pests.</p>
<p>Empty the contents of the fridge. Open the freezer, remove all food items, clean out the ice maker, and make sure that it&#8217;s turned off. Defrost the freezer, unplug the unit, and clean it out, if needed. Wipe down any spills that may have gone ignored throughout the spring and summer when you were busy enjoying your travel trailer.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Camper:</h4>
<p>Make sure that you prop open both the fridge and freezer doors. Even a little moisture left can lead to mold and mildew growth, especially during a warm spell. Prop something against the doors to keep them open, if needed.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Step Seven: Unplug All Your Electronics</h3>
<p>To help protect the integrity of your electronics throughout the winter, make sure you go through the camper and unplug all of them. This includes:</p>
<ul>
<li>TVs</li>
<li>Stereos</li>
<li>DVD or Bluray players</li>
<li>Charging stations for your phone</li>
<li>Your coffee maker</li>
<li>The water pump</li>
<li>Your microwave</li>
<li>Anything else plugged in throughout the camper</li>
</ul>
<p>Keep in mind that extreme cold can be hard on electronics. If you live in an area that sees dramatic temperatures during the winter, you may want to consider removing some of those items from the camper and storing them <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/self-storage-more-creative/">in a climate-controlled location</a> throughout the winter.</p>
<h3>Step Eight: Make Sure Your Propane Is No Longer Connected</h3>
<p>During the winter, when you won&#8217;t be in your camper, you might not notice a propane leak. Before winter arrives, remove your portable propane tanks and cap the lines. If you have an onboard propane tank, make sure you shut it off completely before you leave your camper for the winter.</p>
<h3>Step Nine: Seal All the Gaps</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6859" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Man-checking-the-electrical-panel-of-his-camper-for-gaps-and-holes.jpg" alt="Man checking the electrical panel of his camper for gaps and holes" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Small gaps in your camper could lead to big problems over the winter months, when pests may begin to creep in. Seal all the gaps throughout your camper to protect your investment.</p>
<p>Take a look at:</p>
<h4>Outside Outlets</h4>
<p>Take a look at inlets, outlets, exhaust guards, and anything else that pests might see as an entryway during the cold winter months. Mesh screens can help cover some openings. If you&#8217;re particularly worried about pests, especially small ones, you may even want to use shrink wrap to cover those areas. This will prevent pests from making their way inside and ensure that your camper will remain pest-free throughout the winter.</p>
<h4>Gaps Around Windows and Doors</h4>
<p>In addition to your efforts to find any holes in your camper that could open an invitation to pests, make sure you take a look at your windows and doors. Are there any gaps that could invite them inside? If you can feel outside air, chances are, there&#8217;s a gap somewhere. Also, if you can see daylight, you may need to fill in those gaps! Lap sealant will not only deter insects; it will also prevent water from leaking inside over the rainy winter.</p>
<h4>Cracks on the Roof</h4>
<p>As your camper gets older, or if it&#8217;s seen some extreme weather over the spring and summer months, you may want to consider taking a look up at the roof. Do you notice any cracks starting to form? What may not be noticeable when you&#8217;re using your camper regularly may prove a much larger problem during the winter, when heavy snowfall or the melt/freeze cycle could cause those gaps to widen.</p>
<p>You can install a full-coverage sealant to take care of as many of those cracks as possible and extend the life of your roof, or you may choose to use lap sealant in that area, as well.</p>
<h3>Step Ten: Clean the Awning</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6860" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Woman-cleaning-the-awning-of-her-camper-trailer.jpg" alt="Woman cleaning the awning of her camper trailer" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Your awning offers great coverage during the hot summer months when you might want to enjoy sitting outside your camper and chatting with family and friends. Look for special camper or RV awning cleaner, rather than using dish detergent or commercial cleaners.</p>
<p>Roll the awning out and clean the fabric. Pay particular attention to any cracks or tears, which could indicate that you need to repair or replace the awning.</p>
<h3>Step Eleven: Wash and Wax Your Camper to Have It Looking Its Best</h3>
<p>During the summer, you might not take the time to wash and wax your camper between one adventure and the next. Many camper users struggle to keep the external area of the camper clean since it often won&#8217;t fit through a traditional car wash. To make your camper look its best, however, take the time to wash and wax it before storing it for the winter.</p>
<p>Go over your travel trailer from end to end, washing as you go. Pay particular attention to the windshield and grills, where bugs may splatter throughout your drive. This is also a great chance to note any dings or problems with the paint, including chipped areas where rust could creep in and destroy your investment. Finally, add a coat of wax to help protect the paint and have your camper look its shiny best.</p>
<h3>Step Twelve: Choose the Best Location for Your Camper</h3>
<p>Once you&#8217;re done with the basic process of how to winterize a camper, you need to choose the ideal location for your camper to stay for the winter. You want a convenient location where you can check on your camper occasionally throughout the winter, especially following extreme weather. At the same time, you need a location that will allow your camper to sit flat throughout the winter months. Stabilizers can help prevent your camper from moving as you&#8217;re winterizing and throughout the winter.</p>
<h3>Step Thirteen: Tuck Your Camper in for the Winter</h3>
<p>Putting your camper under a cover for the winter can protect it from the elements and help prevent it from getting struck by debris. While your camper is certainly designed to sit outside for long periods of time, you want it to remain as safe as possible — and to extend its lifespan so that you can enjoy adventuring with your family for many years to come. Choose a camper cover that is sturdy but somewhat breathable. Consider using rags to pad sharp areas if needed to help reduce holes in your camper.</p>
<p>Are you struggling with the process of how to winterize a camper? If you have trouble figuring out how to winterize a travel trailer, motorhome, or camper, a local camper store or service station can help with the task and make it easier. Need a place to store your camper for the winter? Just like when <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/places-to-store-a-car/">storing a car</a>, check out<a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=header&amp;utm_medium=headerlogo"> local storage options</a>, including people who might be willing to allow you to borrow space in a driveway or under a carport for the winter.</p>
<h2>Additional Winterization Resources</h2>
<p><ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul><br />
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">The Ultimate Guide to How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Put Christmas Lights on the Roof: A Complete Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-put-christmas-lights-on-roof-complete-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-put-christmas-lights-on-roof-complete-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 15 Dec 2020 19:00:21 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[lifestyle tips]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6874</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>As the temperatures dip and the holiday season approaches, many homeowners are beginning to plan a Christmas light display. But before you dig your favorite holiday lights out of storage and dig through your garage for the ladder, it&#8217;s a good idea to take a moment to consider the best way to complete your project. For many, [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-put-christmas-lights-on-roof-complete-guide/">How to Put Christmas Lights on the Roof: A Complete Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>As the temperatures dip and the holiday season approaches, many homeowners are beginning to plan a Christmas light display. But before you dig your favorite holiday lights out of <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=header&amp;utm_medium=headerlogo">storage </a>and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/garage-storage-ideas/">dig through your garage</a> for the ladder, it&#8217;s a good idea to take a moment to consider the best way to complete your project. For many, hanging Christmas lights is a large DIY project that can be difficult to complete. Luckily, it doesn&#8217;t have to be. Learn how to put Christmas lights on the roof without hassle or damage with the right tools and a comprehensive plan.</p>
<h2>Can Hanging Christmas Lights on My Roof Damage My Shingles?</h2>
<p>Without the right tools, hanging Christmas lights can cause minor damage that leads to leaks and extensive damage over time. If you hang Christmas lights on your roof, it&#8217;s essential to avoid puncturing your asphalt shingles, tin surfaces, or other protective roof coverings.</p>
<p>While it seems harmless, even small holes from nails or staples can cause damage to your roof. These holes allow water to seep beneath your roof&#8217;s protective surface. When temperatures drop and the water freezes, the ice expands and creates more damage to your shingles and the roofing materials beneath. Holes in your gutters will cause water to leak where it shouldn&#8217;t, and holes in your fascia boards can cause them to rot. Always use plastic clips designed to hang Christmas lights so you can avoid damage. They come in a variety of styles to give you the ability to attach lights in several ways.</p>
<h2>Your Christmas Lighting Supply List</h2>
<p>For a hassle-free light hanging session, it&#8217;s essential to have the right tools and supplies available for your holiday decorations. Instead of making several trips to the store or making use of whatever you have on hand, gather the right supplies before you begin working. You&#8217;ll need these supplies to put Christmas lights on the roof safely:</p>
<ul>
<li>Ladder: Unless you use a hanging pole or rent a bucket lift, you&#8217;ll likely need a ladder to reach your gutters or eaves to hang clips and attach the lights.</li>
<li>Plastic Clips: These handy tools are the way to hang your Christmas lights without damage to your home. Shingle clips and gutter clips are the most common varieties.</li>
<li>Lights: Whether you prefer LED bulbs, icicle lights, simple white lights, or colorful C-9 lights, make sure you have enough working lights to carry out your dazzling plan.</li>
<li>Light Tester: You must check all lights (even new ones) to make sure they&#8217;re working correctly.</li>
<li>Hanging Pole: If you prefer to avoid the ladder, a hanging pole can make it possible to decorate from the ground.</li>
<li>Outdoor Extension Cord: You&#8217;ll likely need an extension cord to reach from your outlet to your roof.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Put Christmas Lights on the Roof:</h4>
<p>Before you stock up on long strings of lights, consider the benefits of short 50-light strands. They&#8217;re easier to handle and can be quickly and inexpensively replaced if a string goes out during the season.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Put Christmas Lights on the Roof: Your Step-by-Step Guide</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6877" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/Man-hanging-Christmas-lights-above-a-houses-gutter.jpg" alt="Man hanging Christmas lights along a house's gutter" width="870" height="560" /></p>
<p>Your roof provides you with the best way to make your holiday lights stand out and really be seen. Unfortunately, it&#8217;s not the most easily accessible place to work. Planning ahead and taking careful steps will make your chore safer and easier. No matter what <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/popular-types-houses-america/">type of house</a> you live in, it&#8217;s possible to create a beautiful Christmas display. Take these steps for a successful afternoon decorating your home.</p>
<h3>1. Make a Plan</h3>
<p>Before you even step on the ladder to hang outdoor Christmas lights, you should know exactly where you want everything placed and have the measurements to know it will actually work. Begin by locating your outdoor plugin. That&#8217;s where your starting point will be. Measure your roof and ensure you have enough lights to correspond with that length. The best Christmas lights begin with a careful plan.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Put Christmas Lights on the Roof:</h4>
<p>Find a family member, neighbor, or friend who can assist you on the day you’re planning to hang your lights. Any time you&#8217;re required to use a ladder or step on the roof, it&#8217;s a good idea to have a helper nearby.</p></blockquote>
<h3>2. Prepare Your Supplies</h3>
<p>You&#8217;ll likely be spending a considerable amount of time on the ladder. Having your supplies lined up and ready to go will help you save time. Make sure you have all the light strings and clips you&#8217;ll need to cover the distance and design you have planned. Remember that placing clips too far apart will leave you with saggy light strings that look less attractive.</p>
<h3>3. Test the Lights Before You Start</h3>
<p>You don&#8217;t want to find out those new lights are defective when you&#8217;re standing at the top of your ladder. Inspect each light string for faulty wires and missing bulbs. If wires are exposed, dispose of the entire string to avoid fire hazards. To remove bulbs, use needle-nose pliers to pull out any mini lights and simply unscrew the larger C-7 or C-9 bulbs counterclockwise. If an entire string fails to light up, check for a blown fuse. If a fuse replacement immediately blows, discard the entire string.</p>
<h3>4. Attach the Clips</h3>
<p>Since you have a plan already in place, you know how far your light strings will reach. Attaching the light clips first will make hanging the lights a breeze. Carefully plant your extension ladder firmly on flat ground and extend it well above the eaves. Make sure your ladder is at a comfortable angle for climbing before you begin working. As you put the clips in place, make sure they&#8217;re all in the same direction. Place clips around 12 inches apart or as recommended by the manufacturer.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Put Christmas Lights on the Roof:</h4>
<p>When you&#8217;re standing on a ladder, never reach far enough to disrupt your center of gravity. Instead, only work where you can reach comfortably before moving the ladder to the next position.</p></blockquote>
<h3>5. Hang the Lights</h3>
<p>When your clips are in place, start back at the beginning with your first string of lights. Whether you attach lights to your gutters or shingles, work strategically. Also, make sure your lights are pointing in the same direction. Avoid attaching strings of lights together ahead of time since shorter strings are easier to work with. Work along the roofline, making sure the line remains taut and in a straight line without pulling too tight.</p>
<h3>6. Set a Timer</h3>
<p>Sure, your lights are spectacular. But you don&#8217;t want them staying on all night. Your light show could keep your neighbors awake and run up your electric bill. Plug your lights into an outdoor timer that will ensure you never forget to turn off the lights. Some outdoor timers even have light sensors that will turn your lights on automatically at dusk. So, even when you aren&#8217;t home, you&#8217;re bringing the holiday spirit to your neighborhood.</p>
<h3>7. Flip the Switch</h3>
<p>It&#8217;s finally showtime. When your job is complete, gather the family outside to admire your handiwork. While waiting until dark to turn on your lights the first time will have the biggest effect, you probably don&#8217;t want to face potential repairs at night. Turn lights on once you&#8217;ve finished working to ensure everything goes as planned.</p>
<h2>Christmas Light Removal and Storage</h2>
<p>After all that work, leaving your lights up throughout the year may seem like the best solution. Unfortunately, it&#8217;s not a great idea. Having a storage plan is an essential part of how to put Christmas lights on the roof. Extended exposure to sunlight can fade your lights, making them appear dim and faded next season. Additionally, many homes get more sunlight on one side of the home. This means your lights can fade unevenly and looked mismatched when you&#8217;re ready to use them.</p>
<p>When it&#8217;s time to remove your Christmas lights, avoid the urge to simply pull the string and watch everything fall. You could damage the lights (even if they&#8217;re LED lights), your gutters, and anything the strings hit on the way down. This can lead to costly roof repair. Instead, carefully remove your lights one clip at a time. Roll them carefully to avoid kinks and broken bulbs. This practice will also make the light strings easier to manage next year.</p>
<p>Carefully pack your lights in boxes with sufficient padding and store them in a dry place while they&#8217;re out of use. If you like to really deck the halls each year with a particularly extravagant display, consider finding a safe <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/self-storage-industry-statistics/">storage solution</a> to keep all your Christmas decorations in perfect condition while they&#8217;re out of use.</p>
<p>Learning how to put Christmas lights on the roof is a great way to create a festive display at home during the holiday season. Once you take the time to learn all the details and collect the proper supplies, recreating the effect again and again will be simple.</p>
<h2>Additional Winterization Resources</h2>
<p><ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul><br />
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-put-christmas-lights-on-roof-complete-guide/">How to Put Christmas Lights on the Roof: A Complete Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>More Than Half of Americans Say It&#8217;s OK to Keep Holiday Decorations Up Past Jan. 1</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/half-americans-say-ok-keep-holiday-decorations-past-jan-1/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/half-americans-say-ok-keep-holiday-decorations-past-jan-1/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Mon, 14 Dec 2020 12:00:58 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6925</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Americans are decorating for the holidays earlier and leaving those decorations up longer to bring joy to a tough year amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/half-americans-say-ok-keep-holiday-decorations-past-jan-1/">More Than Half of Americans Say It&#8217;s OK to Keep Holiday Decorations Up Past Jan. 1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>The COVID-19 pandemic has <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/more-americans-plan-to-move-in-2021/">changed </a><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/more-americans-plan-to-move-in-2021/"><em><i>everything</i></em></a><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/more-americans-plan-to-move-in-2021/"> about our lives</a> — and that includes how we’re celebrating the holidays this year.</p>
<p>Many people are traveling less or skipping traditional gatherings. With unemployment still high, gifts might be less of a priority this year for some.</p>
<p>But we wondered how the pandemic has impacted one of our favorite holiday traditions — decorating. Has COVID-19 changed how Americans are decorating their homes for the season? Has it changed how we think about and appreciate our holiday decorations?</p>
<p>We surveyed 1,101 Americans to find out, and now it’s here: <strong><b>Neighbor’s 2020 “Deck the Halls” Report</b></strong>. We’ll dig deeper into all of these statistics down below, but here’s a quick summary of some of the most interesting things we learned:</p>
<ul>
<li>The largest share of respondents (around a third of them) say <strong><b>the day after Thanksgiving is the best day to put up decorations</b></strong>. Dec. 1 and the Saturday after Thanksgiving were also popular days for decorating.</li>
<li>More than half of Americans say it’s OK to leave your decorations up past Jan. 1 — <strong><b>51% of respondents said Jan. 2 is the best day to take them down</b></strong>.</li>
<li>With that in mind, when is “too late” to still have decorations up? Respondents were divided — <strong><b>31% said Jan. 15, and 33% said Feb. 1</b></strong>. Don’t tell that to the 9% who said it’s fine to leave them up all year.</li>
<li>Lights out? Apparently not. <strong><b>Almost half of Americans say it’s totally OK to leave holiday lights on all night long</b></strong>.</li>
<li>How does COVID-19 factor in when it comes to holiday decorating? <strong><b>Almost half of Americans said they’re either decorating earlier or decorating more than usual</b></strong>.</li>
<li><b></b><strong><b>83% said decorations are helping bring more joy to a tough year</b></strong>. But people are also decorating more and earlier because they’re spending more time at home, and can take time to really enjoy their holiday handiwork.</li>
<li>The holiday spirit abounds! 74% of people are feeling neighborly about the holidays, and <strong><b>don’t see decorating as a competition with their neighbors</b></strong>.</li>
</ul>
<h2>When Should Decorations Go Up? At Least Wait Til After Thanksgiving</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6927 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/02-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="When Should Decorations Go Up? At Least Wait Til After Thanksgiving" width="1914" height="1018" /></p>
<p>It’s a debate that’s raged for years: How early is too early for holiday decorations? Americans feel so strongly about the subject, they’ve given it a name: “Christmas creep,” or the way holiday items and sales seem to start appearing in stores earlier and earlier each year.</p>
<p>In our survey, there was no clear consensus here, except that most Americans (80% of them, to be exact) say you should at least wait til Thanksgiving has passed. More specifically, the most popular days for putting decorations up were:</p>
<ul>
<li>The day after Thanksgiving (34%)</li>
<li>Dec. 1 (16%)</li>
<li>The Saturday after Thanksgiving (13%)<em><i> </i></em></li>
</ul>
<h2>What About Taking Them Down? More Than Half Say After the New Year</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6928 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/03-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="What About Taking Them Down? More Than Half Say After the New Year" width="1914" height="945" /></p>
<p>Just as hotly debated is the question of when holiday decorations should come down. Is it OK to leave them up after Christmas Day? Boxing Day? New Year’s Eve? Valentine’s Day?</p>
<p>Once again, Americans who participated in our survey were split on the exact day. However, there’s no need to rush to get your decorations down right after Christmas — more than half of people said the best day to un-decorate is Jan. 2. That’s why we’re <strong><b>officially declaring Jan. 2 to be National Un-Deck the Halls Day</b></strong>. You heard it here first.</p>
<h3>When Is “Too Late” to Have Decorations Up? (We Say Never)</h3>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6929 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/04-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="When Is “Too Late” to Have Decorations Up? (We Say Never)" width="1914" height="944" /></p>
<p>If we’re all waiting til after the New Year to take our decorations down, why not just keep waiting? Why not just keep them up and spread that holiday cheer all the way til spring?</p>
<p>Well, we wouldn’t mind — but your neighbors might. According to our survey, there is a point when it becomes “too late” for holiday decorations to still be up.</p>
<p>Once again, respondents were mixed. But the majority of people said that decorations are up “too late” if you don’t take them down by Feb. 1. There is that 9% of people who said they can stay up all year — they’re invited to all our holiday parties (once parties are a thing again).</p>
<h2>What Time Should Holiday Lights Be Turned Off? Most People Say There Isn’t One</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6930 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/05-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="What Time Should Holiday Lights Be Turned Off? Most People Say There Isn’t One" width="1914" height="991" /></p>
<p>Lights out? Apparently not. When asked what time exterior holiday lights and other light-up decorations should be turned off, nearly half of Americans said it’s actually fine to leave them on all night. That’s the kind of holiday cheer we’re here for.</p>
<p>However, almost a third of people (29%, to be exact) said 10 p.m., so if you want to err on the side of caution, that’s probably a good time to pull the plug for the night.</p>
<h2>Has the Pandemic Changed Decorating Habits? In a Word, Yes</h2>
<p>One of the biggest things we wondered about was how COVID-19 was affecting people’s decorating habits.</p>
<p>Most Americans say they’re decorating earlier than usual, putting up more decorations than usual, or both. In fact, 33% said they’re decorating earlier and 26% said they’re decorating more, compared to just 14% who said they’re decorating later and 19% who said they’re decorating less.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6931 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/06-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="Has the Pandemic Changed Decorating Habits? In a Word, Yes" width="1913" height="1081" /></p>
<p>The reasons people are changing their decorating habits are varied, but the overwhelming majority of people — 83% — said holiday decorating is helping them bring some cheer to a year that’s been really tough.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6932 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/07-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="holiday decorating is helping them bring some cheer to a year that’s been really tough." width="1914" height="1028" /></p>
<p>It’s no wonder people want those holiday decorations up in their homes — the top way people said the pandemic is disrupting their usual holiday traditions is that they’re traveling less and spending more time at home <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/survey-quarantine-brought-families-closer-together/">with their immediate families</a>. If you decorate more, that just means more time to admire your holiday handiwork.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6933 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/08-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="pandemic affecting holiday traditions" width="1914" height="1708" /></p>
<h2>Are Decorators Feeling Neighborly? Most Said Yes</h2>
<p>We here at Neighbor love learning more about <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/">how neighbors come together for one another</a>. So we were pretty excited to see that most Americans don’t compete with their neighbors over holiday decorations. We hope the 24% who do are keeping things fun and friendly.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6934 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/09-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="Are Decorators Feeling Neighborly? Most Said Yes" width="1914" height="1009" /></p>
<p>And since our platform is all about connecting neighbors to share extra space in their homes with others who need to store belongings, we couldn’t let this survey go without asking people about where they store their holiday decor during the off-season.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6935 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/10-Neighbor_holiday.png" alt="where do people store holiday decorations after use" width="1914" height="929" /></p>
<p>Basements, garages, and closets are all popular spots, but if you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/smart-storage-ideas/">don’t have those spaces in your home</a> — or you’re just running out of storage space for your holiday display — consider <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">Neighbor</a> to find a safe, secure place for your decorations to live from Jan. 2 to the day after next Thanksgiving (or whenever <em><i>you</i></em> decide you want to put them up and take them down).</p>
<h2>Survey Methodology</h2>
<p>We surveyed 1,101 American adults using Pollfish.com. They came from 48 states and the District of Columbia.</p>
<p>Their ages broke down like this:</p>
<ul>
<li>18-24 years old: 12%;</li>
<li>25-34 years old: 28%;</li>
<li>35-44 years old: 37%;</li>
<li>45-54 years old: 12%;</li>
<li>55 and older: 12%.</li>
</ul>
<p>54% were female and 46% were male.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/half-americans-say-ok-keep-holiday-decorations-past-jan-1/">More Than Half of Americans Say It&#8217;s OK to Keep Holiday Decorations Up Past Jan. 1</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Winterize a Car: The Ultimate Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 10 Dec 2020 19:00:40 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[car tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winter tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winterizing]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6840</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Winter weather can be tough to face. The conditions can also wreak havoc on your car. If you’re not going to store your car for the winter, preparing your car for the cold, wet conditions of winter is the best way to avoid damage. Unfortunately, many drivers don&#8217;t know how to winterize a car. Instead [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car: The Ultimate Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Winter weather can be tough to face. The conditions can also wreak havoc on your car. If you’re not going to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/places-to-store-a-car/">store your car for the winter</a>, preparing your car for the cold, wet conditions of winter is the best way to avoid damage. Unfortunately, many drivers don&#8217;t know how to winterize a car. Instead of simply hoping for the best, learn how to protect each part of your vehicle from winter weather with this ultimate guide.</p>
<h2>How Does Winter Weather Damage Your Car?</h2>
<p>There are several ways that winter weather can cause damage or extra stress on your vehicle&#8217;s working parts. Wet weather and freezing temperatures combine to create harsh conditions that can harm your car&#8217;s exterior, interior, and even the motor.</p>
<p>Your car doesn&#8217;t seem delicate, but it has a variety of running parts and other features that require maintenance and care to keep it in great shape. Your car&#8217;s exterior is designed to survive the outdoor elements, and the motor is capable of running in a variety of temperatures, but special care for winter conditions is essential. From freezing temps to the chemicals used to keep the road safe, winter provides a wealth of threats for your vehicle to face. Taking the time to learn how to winterize a car reduces the risk of these problems:</p>
<h3>Your Battery Dies</h3>
<p>Your battery has to work harder to turn over in freezing temperatures. Additionally, you&#8217;re more likely to run windshield wipers, heat, and lights during the winter months. Older batteries are more likely to die, so it&#8217;s important to replace your battery every three years.</p>
<h3>Your Tires Are Low</h3>
<p>Cold weather reduces your tire pressure. If you don&#8217;t check them frequently, your tires may be underinflated — causing them to wear out more quickly and even lead to potential blowouts.</p>
<h3>Frozen Gas Lines</h3>
<p>Quickly changing temperatures can lead to condensation in your gas tank. When this moisture backs up into your gas lines, it can freeze and make your car inoperable. The most common sign of frozen gas lines is failure to start. In extremely cold temperatures, your gas lines freeze while your car is producing heat. Sputtering and stalling can signal this problem.</p>
<h3>Corrosion and Rust</h3>
<p>To avoid slippery, dangerous conditions, the roads are often coated with salt. Road salt and other chemicals used to melt ice and snow can corrode the metals that make up your car&#8217;s body and frame. The parts of your vehicle that suffer from repeat exposure are the most difficult to see and often fail to get washed. Muffler, exhaust, and brake damage are common problems.</p>
<h3>Damage to Running Parts</h3>
<p>Your car&#8217;s belts, hoses, and gaskets are made of rubber that is designed to be pliable. Freezing temperatures can cause these important parts to wear quickly, become brittle, and break or crack. When any of these elements break while your car is in motion, significant damage can occur. Preparing these parts before temperatures drop is essential.</p>
<h3>Sluggish Fluids</h3>
<p>Your car&#8217;s fluids like oil, brake fluid, transmission fluid, and power steering fluid thicken when temperatures drop. When these liquids become thick, they do their job less effectively. Some vehicles even require different fluids during the winter months.</p>
<h3>Leaky Systems</h3>
<p>When plastics heat and cool quickly, condensation occurs. This can lead to freezing within the lines of different systems that are essential for your car&#8217;s function. This freezing can cause additional pressure, leading to dangerous leaks of vital fluids. Leaks in your brake or power steering system can lead to malfunctions that could potentially cause an accident.</p>
<h3>Unexpected Damage</h3>
<p>Road hazards like obstacles and potholes can hide beneath snow and ice. When you add frosty, foggy windows to the equation, limited visibility can lead to a variety of dangerous situations. Icy roadways can lead to collisions with trees and other vehicles. Winter tires can help you grip slippery surfaces to avoid collisions. Other preparations can help increase your visibility.</p>
<h3>Your Motor Freezes Up</h3>
<p>Antifreeze lowers the temperature at which your radiator freezes. If you don&#8217;t have enough antifreeze in your coolant system, you can experience significant, expensive damage. An improper coolant ratio can cause your fluid to freeze and expand within your car&#8217;s motor block. If you&#8217;re unsure about the age and amount of antifreeze in your coolant system, it&#8217;s essential to have it replaced.</p>
<h3>Damage to Your Car&#8217;s Exterior</h3>
<p>The outside of your car faces frost, wind, ice, and snow. This can lead to windshield damage, paint damage, and exposure to rust-causing chemicals. Without proper care, your car might also face windshield scratches, body panel damage, cracks, chips, and rust.</p>
<h2>How to Winterize a Car</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6844" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Neighbor-How-to-Winterize-a-Car-A-car-owner-checking-his-tires-air-pressure-at-the-start-of-winter.jpg" alt="A car owner checking his tire's air pressure at the start of winter" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Whether you take your car to your local mechanic or prefer to take a DIY approach to certain car maintenance tasks, understanding how to winterize a car will help you ensure all the right steps have been taken. Certain jobs for your car&#8217;s exterior, tasks under the hood, and even maintenance for tires are vital for safe winter driving. We’ve broken our guide down into key steps for how to winterize a car’s exterior, internal parts, and interior.</p>
<h3>How to Winterize a Car Exterior</h3>
<p>The outside of your car can use some extra care to prepare for the harsh weather. Some simple preparations for a car&#8217;s exterior can help you prevent rust, improve visibility in dangerous winter conditions, and help you on slippery roads. Take these steps to winterize the outside of your car:</p>
<ul>
<li>Wash and Wax: Washing your car extends the life of your car&#8217;s protective paint and keeps external mechanical parts working properly. After your car is thoroughly washed and dried, apply a fresh coat of wax to repel road debris, wet weather, and chemicals used to keep the roads clear.</li>
<li>Replace Your Windshield Wipers: Visibility is essential for safe driving. Inspect your windshield wipers for signs of wear like cracking or stiffness. Other signs your wipers need to be replaced include streaks or water left on the windshield and scratching or skidding when wipers are in use. You can also install winter wipers that are equipped with extra rubber that keeps ice from collecting on the blades.</li>
<li>Lubricate the Door Locks: Water can get into your trunk and door locks and freeze, effectively locking you out of your car even when you have a key. Lubricate locks ahead of freezing weather with a silicone spray or door-lock lubricant.</li>
<li>Switch or Inflate Your Tires: Your tires carry a lot of weight, travel many miles, and are a major part of keeping you safe on slippery roads. If you live in an area that gets a lot of ice and snow, consider switching from your regular all-season tires to winter tires. These tires resist hardening in freezing weather to grip the road better. No matter what kind of tires you use during the winter, it&#8217;s essential to check your tire pressure. Tire pressure drops one psi of every 10-degree drop in temperature, so your tires will likely need more air.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Car:</h4>
<p>Drivers who switch to winter tires each year can save time by investing in an inexpensive set of steel wheels. Mounting your winter tires on steel wheels will make for an easy swap and save your alloy wheels from winter damage.</p></blockquote>
<h3>How to Prepare Your Car&#8217;s Mechanical Parts for Winter Weather</h3>
<p>The motor in your vehicle is designed to stand up to hundreds of miles of use. Still, it needs extra care to provide you with the best possible performance during the winter months. Preparing all of your car&#8217;s running parts for the harsh effects of winter weather will extend the life of your car and help prevent the likelihood of a breakdown that could leave you stranded for hours in the cold.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Car:</h4>
<p>If you don&#8217;t know how to check the fluids in your car, have it serviced before freezing weather arrives to ensure you have enough antifreeze.</p></blockquote>
<h4>Test the Mechanic Elements</h4>
<p>Even if you routinely visit a mechanic, it&#8217;s a good idea to have an understanding of your car&#8217;s essential winter functions.</p>
<p>Before temperatures dip below freezing, ensure these features are in optimal working order.</p>
<ul>
<li>Heater: Ensure your heater turns on without making unusual noises and without difficulty. If the air doesn&#8217;t warm up properly, your thermostat may be stuck in the closed position, or your air cabin filter may need to be replaced.</li>
<li>Rear Window Defroster: Visibility is key for safe driving, and unobstructed windshields are required by law in many states.</li>
<li>Windshield Wipers: Your wiper motor faces a heavy load during winter.</li>
<li>Hazard Lights and Dome Light: You use your car&#8217;s lights during the summer, but it&#8217;s easy to overlook the ones you don&#8217;t use all the time. These lights are essential if you actually get stuck in a winter storm. Your car&#8217;s dome lights and hazard lights are the best way to make you visible to other drivers and rescuers.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Check the Fluids</h3>
<p>Your vehicle depends on a variety of fluids to keep it in peak running condition. If you&#8217;re unfamiliar with fluid receptacles and how to check and change the fluids in your car&#8217;s motor, have it serviced by a professional. Still, it&#8217;s important for all drivers to have a basic understanding of the changes your car should undergo to be prepared for freezing temperatures. Use this checklist to ensure your car is running the proper types of fluids for the winter season.</p>
<h5>Coolant:</h5>
<p>While it&#8217;s safe to use water during the summer, it&#8217;s vital that your coolant system runs a 50/50 or 30/70 antifreeze to water ratio. If you take on the responsibility of adding coolant to your radiator, make sure you <a href="https://www.motorweek.org/features/goss_garage/engine_cooling_basics/" target="_blank">understand what you&#8217;re using</a>. Antifreeze can be purchased either at full strength or pre-mixed. Only add water if you buy a full-strength coolant. If you&#8217;re unsure about the age and amount of your coolant, you can use a tool called an antifreeze refractometer to measure your coolant strength.</p>
<h5>Oil:</h5>
<p>Most modern vehicles use multi-weight oil suitable for a wide range of temperatures. Still, some manufacturers recommend using a different weight oil in certain temperatures because all oil thickens when cold. Check your owner&#8217;s manual to determine whether you should have an oil change before temperatures drop.</p>
<h5>Transmission Fluid:</h5>
<p>Your car&#8217;s transmission fluid cools the engine and lubricates gears, which is vital for your four-wheel drive (4WD) or all-wheel drive (AWD) system. You or your mechanic should check the transmission fluid and top it off if needed.</p>
<h5>Window Washer:</h5>
<p>Road chemicals and wet weather will have you washing your windshield often. If you use water in your windshield washer receptacle during the summer months, now is the time to drain it. Water can freeze in the lines and prevent the system from working at all. If you&#8217;re unsure whether your washer fluid is rated for freezing temperatures, consider adding a bottle of washer fluid antifreeze to the reservoir.</p>
<h4>Test the Battery</h4>
<p>Your battery requires more power to start the vehicle during cold temperatures. If you&#8217;ve recently replaced your battery, you&#8217;re probably safe. If you don&#8217;t know your battery&#8217;s age, there are a few ways to test its charging power. Maintenance-free batteries have a window at the top that will indicate a fully charged state. You can also have your battery professionally tested at a service station or auto parts store. Have the battery recharged or replaced before it goes completely dead.</p>
<h4>Inspect Belts and Hoses</h4>
<p>If you touch the hood of your vehicle after driving, you get a pretty good understanding of how hot a running motor gets. During winter, all the components under your car&#8217;s hood face freezing temperatures followed by extreme heat every time you get behind the wheel. This can be especially tough on rubber belts and hoses.</p>
<p>When your car&#8217;s engine is cold, check the radiator and heater hoses for signs of brittle or cracked spots or contamination from oil and grease. Hoses should feel firm and pliable. If they&#8217;re soft or brittle, they need to be replaced. Additionally, your belts should be inspected by a service professional every fall.</p>
<h3>How to Winterize a Car: Winter Tips for Your Car&#8217;s Interior</h3>
<p>Cold, wet weather means rushing through rain, sleet, and snow to get to the warmth of your waiting car quickly. It also means you probably track a lot more dirt, mud, and debris into your vehicle. Winter weather also typically brings germs from winter illnesses. Add holiday shopping into the mix, and you find your family spending a considerable amount of extra time inside your vehicle. Taking the right steps can help you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-car-seats-a-complete-guide/">keep your car clean</a> and even prevent winter damage to help keep you safe.</p>
<h4>Prepare an Emergency Kit</h4>
<p>Perhaps the most important thing you can do for your personal protection during a winter storm is to prepare for emergencies. Even if you know how to winterize a car, extreme weather can make something go wrong. If you do end up stranded in a winter storm, the materials you have on hand can make all the difference. Collect these items for your vehicle&#8217;s winter emergency kit.</p>
<h5>Emergency Kit Items:</h5>
<ul>
<li>Jumper Cables: Batteries under extra strain are more likely to die. Your jumper cables can revive your battery or allow you to offer a helping hand to another driver in need.</li>
<li>Flashlight and Batteries: Winter weather and slippery roads often worsen at night. Ensure you&#8217;ll be prepared with a flashlight and spare batteries in your car.</li>
<li>Matches: A fire will allow you to keep warm, signal rescuers, and melt snow if necessary.</li>
<li>First Aid Kit: A fender bender can leave you stranded in cold weather with minor injuries. Having the supplies you need can make all the difference when you&#8217;re waiting for help.</li>
<li>Blankets: A half-hour in freezing weather can be excruciating. Blankets allow you to trap body heat to stay warmer longer.</li>
<li>Bottled Water: Stay alert and avoid dehydration.</li>
<li>Phone Charger: Your phone battery depletes faster during freezing weather, and your phone is no good with a dead battery.</li>
<li>Tire Pressure Gauge, Inflator, and Repair Kit: Cold weather leads to deflated tires. Hidden obstacles under snow and ice can lead to blowouts.</li>
<li>Road Flares: Whether you&#8217;re attracting rescuers or warning oncoming traffic of danger, road flares make sure you&#8217;ll be noticed.</li>
<li>Warm Clothing (Extra Jacket, Socks, Boots, Hat, etc.): Emergencies happen when you least expect them. Your New Year&#8217;s party attire may not provide you with the coverage you need if you get stranded in a snow storm.</li>
<li>Shovel and Bag of Sand: You can shovel snow from around your tires and use sand for additional traction. Other options include traction mats and snow chains.</li>
<li>Car Tool Kit: The ability to make simple auto repairs is most frequently hampered by the lack of tools. Having them on hand can help you avoid getting stranded.</li>
<li>Non-Perishable Food: Calories will help you maintain your body temperature when stranded in cold weather.</li>
</ul>
<h4>Invest in Rubber Floor Mats</h4>
<p>Ice, snow, road salt, and grime are easily tracked into your car during the winter. Purchasing all rubber floor mats will prevent salty ice and snow from seeping into your carpet and reaching your floorboards to cause rust. Rubber floor mats can be purchased at most department stores and are relatively inexpensive. This investment <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/save-money-fast/">can save you money</a> in the long run.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Car:</h4>
<p>If you purchase after-market floor mats or ones not specifically designed for your vehicle, make sure they don&#8217;t interfere with the working of the gas and brake pedals.</p></blockquote>
<h4>Check and Clean Gaskets</h4>
<p>The gaskets around your car doors help keep out air. However, wet weather and freezing temperatures can cause these gaskets to freeze, making it impossible to get your doors open safely. Add a thorough inspection of each gasket to your how to winterize a car checklist. If they are cracked or damaged, it&#8217;s time to have them replaced. Dirt and grime on your gaskets can also cause your doors to freeze. Use a clean cloth and soapy water to clean your gaskets. Dry them completely and lubricate the gaskets with a silicone lubricant.</p>
<h2>6 Habits to Practice for Safe Winter Driving</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6843" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Neighbor-How-to-Winterize-a-Car-A-car-owner-adding-antifreeze-fluid-to-their-car.jpg" alt="A car owner adding antifreeze fluid to their car" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Winterizing your car prepares it for the months ahead. But learning how to winterize a car only gets your car ready for the first day of cold weather. There are also additional steps you should take throughout the winter months to keep your car safe and in peak condition. Practice these habits to stay safe and keep your vehicle in top shape during winter.</p>
<h3>1. Let Your Engine Warm Up</h3>
<p>Older vehicles have difficulty running in cold weather if not sufficiently warmed up. Modern cars will start up and take off right away, but it puts extra stress on the car&#8217;s working parts. Letting your car idle for a few minutes will warm up and thin the oil for the best performance.</p>
<h3>2. Keep the Gas Tank at Least Half Full</h3>
<p>More gas in the tank reduces condensation, which prevents freeze-ups. Additionally, if you end up stranded, you&#8217;ll need to depend on your engine to stay warm.</p>
<h3>3. Learn Winter Driving Skills</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-to-a-new-state/">new to the area</a> and not used to driving in ice and snow, learn about the different techniques you should use while driving on slippery surfaces. Common tips include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Avoid sudden braking.</li>
<li>Accelerate gently.</li>
<li>Steer slightly into a skid.</li>
<li>Avoid sudden starts and stops on slopes.</li>
</ul>
<h4>4. Check the Washer Fluid Frequently</h4>
<p>Winter weather combined with road grime quickly depletes your window washer fluid. Check this frequently so you can ensure you&#8217;ll have good visibility during the worst weather.</p>
<h4>5. Learn Storm Safety Tips</h4>
<p>If you do get stranded in a winter storm, it&#8217;s essential not to take actions that will make your situation worse. Never leave your car because you could quickly lose sight of it in blizzard conditions. Only run your motor for short periods to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Turn on your dome light to attract attention.</p>
<h4>6. Frequently Wash Your Car&#8217;s Undercarriage</h4>
<p>Chemicals used on the road to melt ice and snow can quickly rust your vehicle. Washing the underside of your vehicle, including fender wells (the space surrounding your wheels) and wheels, is a key step of how to winterize a car throughout the season.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a Car:</h4>
<p>Never use hot liquids to defrost your windows. Hot water that comes in direct contact with your cold glass can cause the windshield to fracture. Instead, allow your car to warm up and defrost your windows completely, or use an ice scraper to clear frost and ice.</p></blockquote>
<p>Winter weather can be tough on your car, but staying put for the entire winter while your car sits safely in the garage isn&#8217;t a workable solution. Winterization is a way to keep you and your car safe while still enjoying everything winter has to offer. Learning about the effects of winter weather on your vehicle and how to winterize a car can help you prepare for winter driving in any climate. Proper maintenance during all seasons is essential for extending the life of your vehicle.</p>
<h2>Additional Winterization Resources</h2>
<p><ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul><br />
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car: The Ultimate Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>The Ultimate Moving Checklist</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Wed, 09 Dec 2020 19:00:11 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving checklist]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=5475</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Without a doubt, moving is one of the biggest projects any person, couple, or family will take on. We created the Ultimate Moving Checklist for everything you need to prepare for a big move from 8-weeks out to the big day itself, helping you stay organized, prepared, and as stress-free as possible. Jump To… 8 Weeks Before [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">The Ultimate Moving Checklist</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Without a doubt, moving is one of the biggest projects any person, couple, or family will take on. We created the <b>Ultimate Moving Checklist</b> for everything you need to prepare for a big move from 8-weeks out to the big day itself, helping you stay organized, prepared, and as stress-free as possible.</p>
<p><span id="more-5475"></span> <strong>Jump To…</strong></p>
<p><a href="#8">8 Weeks Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#7">7 Weeks Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#6">6 Weeks Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#5">5 Weeks Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#4">4 Weeks Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#3">3 Weeks Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#2">2 Weeks Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#1">1 Week Before Moving Day</a><br />
<a href="#day">Moving Day Checklist</a></p>
<div id="checklist"></div>
<h2>Home Moving Guide and Checklist</h2>
<p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4sSUhEFWWng" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p>
<p>This is a good time to note that every move is unique. That means the steps you need to take to make it a seamless transition are likely to vary based on your own circumstances and needs.</p>
<p>With that said, consider this checklist to be a starting point. Add to it if you need to, and skip steps that don’t apply to your move.</p>
<div id="8"></div>
<h2>8 Weeks Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6766 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/01-8-Weeks-Section-Header.png" alt="8 Weeks Before Moving Day" width="1793" height="574" /></p>
<p>Start preparing for your move at least eight weeks ahead of your scheduled moving day. This gives you two months of preparation — plenty of time to book services, and with room built into the schedule for a few setbacks.</p>
<p>With eight weeks until moving day, here’s what you need to do:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Draft a plan to organize your move.</strong> Moving requires (and creates) a surprising amount of paperwork. Much of it will be digital, so create a virtual drive folder to store all the research, documents, and photos related to your move so everything is easily accessible when you need them, all in one place. If you have physical files, either scan them to add to your digital drive, or keep all your paperwork together in a folder.</li>
<li><strong>Set your moving budget.</strong> Before you purchase anything for your move, at eight weeks out, you need a budget. Calculate how much you can afford to spend on the entire move, from moving supplies to gas and snacks for the drive. If you have a larger budget, you might add services to your move like dish packing and furniture assembly. If you’re on a tighter budget, those and other services might not be needed.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>PRO MOVING TIP:</strong> Download our <a href="#91ask1s46kca">free moving budget template</a> to get started.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p></p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Research and compare services.</strong> If you are considering hiring professional moving services, now is the time to begin researching options. For nearby moves, a locally owned company might be your favorite. For long-distance moves, it might make more sense to go with a national moving service that has teams and trucks all over the country. As you narrow down your options, make sure the <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">moving services you choose</a> is licensed, has good  reviews, and offers insurance coverage to protect your belongings.</li>
<li><strong>Request time off for your move.</strong> If you’re keeping the same job after your move, now is the time to reach out to HR or your supervisor and request days off around your move date, if you need them. Ask for days around a weekend; for example, if you need four days for your move, request Thursday and Friday off, rather than taking four work days off. If you’re quitting your job, now is the time to think about when you should <a href="https://www.movers.com/moving-guides/how-to-tell-your-employer-that-youre-moving.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollo">give notice that you’re leaving</a>. It should be at least two weeks before your last day, but some workplaces require more notice than that.</li>
<li><strong>Give notice to your current landlord.</strong> If you rent your current home, this is a good time to let your landlord know you plan to move out and won’t be renewing the lease. Two months gives them plenty of time to start looking for a new tenant, as well as arranging turnover services, like cleaning and maintenance.</li>
<li><strong>Explore your new neighborhood.</strong> If you haven’t visited your new neighborhood yet, plan to do so before the move so you can get acquainted with the area before you move in. Book a hotel as close to your new home as possible, and spend a weekend exploring the local community you’re about to call home.</li>
<li><strong>Research nearby schools and the community.</strong> If you have kids, start to get to know the schools in your new area. If you have a choice between multiple schools, research their ratings, curriculum, and parents stories to choose the best option for your family. If there are any community services you take advantage of, now is also the time to research those. Depending on your hobbies and needs, start looking into theaters, community centers, public parks, and any other services you use and enjoy. This is also a good time to start looking into finding a new doctor, dentist, and other important services.</li>
<li><strong>Start searching for a roommate.</strong> If you’re going to live with a roommate in your new home, start looking for one now. You can use a roommate-matching service, or advertise an open room online. Starting early will give you time to vet candidates and find someone who will be a responsible roommate and a good fit for the household.</li>
</ul>
<div id="7"></div>
<h2>7 Weeks Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6778 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/02-7-Weeks-Section-Header.png" alt="7 Weeks Before Moving Day" width="1791" height="593" /></p>
<p>Everything from your eight-week moving checklist should be finished now (or wrapping up soon). Here’s what to do at seven weeks out from your moving day:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Prepare your household for the move.</strong> As moving day gets closer, you’ll need to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">prepare your family for the big changes ahead</a>. If you haven’t already talked to your kids about the move, what to expect, and their feelings about moving to a new home, now is the time.</li>
<li><strong>Start sorting your possessions.</strong> Packing is a lot easier if you sort and declutter everything first. Start going through your home, room by room, and separating out items you don’t want to pack and take with you. Make plans to sell, donate, or recycle them, give them away, or throw them out.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>LEARN MORE:</strong> To begin decluttering your home before a big move, use our <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-things/">Home Decluttering Guide </a>to help you sort through your items.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p></p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Consider and compare moving insurance.</strong> When your belongings are inside your home, they’re generally protected by your homeowners’ or renters’ insurance. That’s not the case during a move, so many families opt for some extra protection, especially if they have valuable items to move. Now is a good time to start researching moving insurance policies. Start by finding out if the moving services you’re considering offer coverage as a package deal.</li>
<li><strong>Get estimates from moving companies.</strong> It may sound like an extra hassle, but you should get in-home estimates from the top few choices on your list of possible moving companies to hire. Doing an estimate in-home allows them to give you a far more accurate estimate of the time and cost of your move. During the estimate, get as much delta as possible. Some questions to ask:
<ul>
<li>Do you offer moving insurance?</li>
<li>How do you handle large or breakable items?</li>
<li>How much extra is packing?</li>
<li>Does it cost extra for furniture disassembly and reassembly?</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><strong>Choose a moving company.</strong> Once you’ve gathered a few estimates and had your questions answered, it’s time to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">choose a moving company</a>. This is also when you’ll choose any extra services, like packing, to add to your move.</li>
<li><strong>Ask friends for help.</strong> If you plan to have friends and family help you pack, ask them now so you (and they) have plenty of time to plan and coordinate.</li>
<li><strong>Make a plan for moving fragile items.</strong> The hardest items to pack are breakables like dishes, glass sculptures, etc., electronics, and valuable items like fine art and musical instruments. This is the time to make a plan to move those items safely. Research best practices, and see if your moving company can offer any help or tips. If you need any special supplies, like special boxes, crates, bubble wrap, or packing materials, order those now.</li>
</ul>
<div id="6"></div>
<h2>6 Weeks Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6779 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/03-6-Weeks-Section-Header.png" alt="6 Weeks Before Moving Day" width="1793" height="574" /></p>
<p>At six weeks until moving day, you can begin making concrete arrangements. Here’s to do at six weeks out:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Schedule the movers.</strong> Now that you’ve chosen a moving company, it’s time to officially hire movers and make your booking. Let them know your moving day and schedule, and if there are any services you need ahead of moving day (like packing), schedule those now.</li>
<li><b>Buy moving boxes or begin collect free ones. </b> Now is the time to start the process of packing, so you&#8217;ll need moving boxes on hand. You can buy them brand new or begin collecting ones for free!</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>LEARN MORE:</strong> Read our article on how to get <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">free moving boxes</a>! There are tons of places where you can pick up free boxes to pack in.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p></p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Order moving supplies.</strong> You’ll need more than just boxes. Create a list of what packing supplies you need. It may include <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/">packing tape</a>, masking tape, markers, scissors, packing paper, cardboard dividers, and more.</li>
<li><strong>Make travel arrangements.</strong> If you’re moving long-distance, this is the time to consider how your family will get from your old home to your new one. If you’re going to drive, look up the route and start planning logistics, like stopping points for breaks, gas, meals, and to spend the night. If you’re flying, book flights now and make arrangements to transport your car, if needed.</li>
<li><strong>Contact insurance providers.</strong> From health insurance to home insurance, you might need to update your policies to reflect your new home and new location. If you need to change insurance companies for your new home, start shopping around and getting quotes now.</li>
<li><strong>Request school transcripts.</strong> If you haven’t already, let your kids’ school(s) know you’re planning to move. This is also the time to request their transcripts if they’re moving schools. These can take time to retrieve and send, so asking early ensures you’ll have them in time to register your kids at their new school.</li>
<li><strong>Identify tax-deductible moving expenses.</strong> If you donate items to charity before your move, or if you’re relocating for work, some of your moving expenses may be tax deductible. Keep careful records of this in your moving file so you’ll be ready to take advantage of savings when you file your taxes.</li>
</ul>
<div id="5"></div>
<h2>5 Weeks Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6780 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/04-5-Weeks-Section-Header.png" alt="5 Weeks Before Moving Day" width="1793" height="574" /></p>
<p>You’re almost halfway through your moving preparations! Now is the time to prepare for the one-month countdown.</p>
<p>At five-weeks out, here&#8217;s what you should do:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Set up new banking accounts.</strong> If you’re changing banks when you move, now is the time to start transferring money into your new account, as it can take a few weeks to fully transfer and become available. Carefully plan this step to ensure you always have access to money, even during the transfer. Having a credit card or two to use for expenses is one strategy (just make sure you pay them off right away). It’s also not a bad idea to take out enough cash to get you through a few weeks, just in case something goes wrong.</li>
<li><strong>Begin cleaning out the pantry and fridge. </strong>Start making meal plans for the next few weeks that will use up perishable foods, so you don’t have any left in the fridge by moving day. Also, try to use up pantry items so you have less heavy food to pack.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="576"><strong>PRO MOVING TIP:</strong> Any non-perishable foods you don’t finish by moving day can be donated to a local food bank, if you don’t want to pack them.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p></p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Create your packing strategy.</strong> Packing will be the most difficult and most time-consuming part of your move. It helps to create a strategy ahead of time. Here are a few ideas:
<ul>
<li>Pack one room at a time.</li>
<li>Use colored tape to label and color-code your boxes.</li>
<li>Have a detailed label for each box.</li>
<li>Correlate color-coded labels to a household inventory sheet.</li>
<li>Empty one room first, and then stack boxes there as you pack the rest of your home.</li>
</ul>
</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li><strong>Begin packing a few items.</strong> Your move should still be over a month away, but it’s never too early to start packing. Look for things you won’t miss over the next month (like items stored in the basement or garage, out-of-season clothing, or items for a spare bedroom) and start packing.</li>
<li><strong>Confirm doorway and stairway measurements.</strong> If you’re moving bulky furniture, make sure it can fit through all the right doors. Measure the doors, turns, and stairways both in your current home and the new home.</li>
<li><strong>Schedule and assess home repairs. </strong>Now is a good time to fix minor problems in your old house, like paint scuffs, loose handles, and leaky faucets. Schedule repairs for those now so you have time to get your hours in tip-top shape before moving day.</li>
</ul>
<div id="4"></div>
<h2>4 Weeks Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6781 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/05-4-Weeks-Section-Header.png" alt="4 Weeks Before Moving Day" width="1793" height="574" /></p>
<p>At this point, you officially have only one month to go until your move – halfway there. Here&#8217;s what to do with four weeks left:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Conduct a change of address.</strong> Run through a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">change of address checklist</a> and set up mail forwarding to begin on your moving date. This is also the time to start taking note of any mail that arrives to your home, and updating your address with all the businesses, entities, and accounts that send you things. That includes your bank, doctor’s office, insurance company, credit card companies — make sure you don’t miss any important companies.</li>
<li><strong>Update local memberships. </strong>If you have any memberships to local gyms, clubs, or grocery stores, cancel them now. If you’re keeping memberships, but at a different location, get in touch with them to update your accounts.</li>
<li><strong>Update online memberships. </strong>The same goes for any online accounts — now is the time to start updating them with your new address.</li>
<li><strong>Throw away hazardous and unwanted items</strong>. Some things can’t move with you, like cans of explosive gasses or flammable items. If you need to move something that can’t legally or safely go into a moving truck, then make separate arrangements or throw it away.</li>
<li><strong>Confirm with the moving company.</strong> Call your professional movers and confirm all your upcoming dates and storage. If you’ve booked any separate services, like packing or storage, call to confirm those, too.</li>
<li><strong>Arrange temporary housing.</strong> If there will be any time between leaving your old home and when you can move into your new home, now is a good time to decide on and book temporary housing for you and your family.</li>
<li><strong>Schedule utility cancellations or move requests.</strong> Most of your utility services can be managed online. In this case, log into your utility accounts or call them directly and notify them of your upcoming move. If you&#8217;ll need to cancel your services, do so one month out so any cancellation fees aren&#8217;t a surprise. If you&#8217;re keeping your existing utility services, schedule your date for a transfer of services from your current home to your new home so your new place has utilities already setup and ready upon arrival.</li>
<li><strong>Book shipping for vehicles and special items.</strong> If you’re shipping your car instead of driving it to your new home, book that now. If you need any special shipping for certain items (like, say, a piano), this is the time to book that, too. If your moving company doesn’t move specialty items, they may be able to recommend a service they like to work with.</li>
<li><strong>Make a list of “Go Box” items.</strong> When you move, you’ll want to create a “go box” — an essentials box containing all the things you need to live day-to-day, which will get you through the times while most of your belongings are packed away and inaccessible. This doesn’t need to be in a box either, luggage is actually great for packing the essentials you’ll need to have with you during your move. Your “go box” should include:
<ul>
<li>A few days worth of clothes.</li>
<li>Toiletries and medications.</li>
<li>Kitchen supplies to cook and eat basic meals.</li>
<li>Devices and chargers.</li>
<li>Anything else you need for work or day-to-day life.</li>
</ul>
</li>
<li><strong>Begin packing. </strong>It’s finally time to start putting everything into boxes. Once you have your “go box” ready, you can start packing up everything else. Make sure to label boxes you’ll want to unpack first at your new home, like the ones with kitchen and bathroom items.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>See Furniture Moving Guides.</strong>Learn all about packing and moving tricky items with additional moving resources:</p>
<p>● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p></p>
<div id="3"></div>
<h2>3 Weeks Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6782 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/06-3-Weeks-Section-Header.png" alt="3 Weeks Before Moving Day" width="1792" height="574" /></p>
<p>You’re well into the final month now, so it’s time to cross final items off your list and tie up loose ends. Here’s what to do three weeks away from moving day:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Cancel regular deliveries and services.</strong> If you have regular deliveries or services that come to your house, cancel them. For services that have been good to you, consider parting with a special thank you and possibly a bonus tip for making your time in the current house more pleasant.</li>
<li><strong>Remind family and friends about your move.</strong> People close to you likely already know, but this is a good time to send a mass message to family and friends about your move. Include your new address and new phone number, if you have one. This is also a great opportunity to invite people to a going-away party, if you’d like to have one.</li>
<li><strong>Get your vehicles serviced.</strong> Take your car in for a check-up and tune-up, especially if you’ll be driving a long distance to the new house. Ensure that your car is up to the task of carrying you, the family, and your bags safely.</li>
<li><strong>Continue packing.</strong> If you haven’t finished packing, keep at it. Aim to be at least halfway finished by the end of this week.</li>
</ul>
<div id="2"></div>
<h2>2 Weeks Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-6783" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/07-2-Weeks-Section-Header.png" alt="" width="1791" height="593" /></p>
<p>With just two weeks to go until moving day, you’re likely exhausted – but hopefully, excited as well! You’re almost there, so try to keep your energy up.</p>
<p>With only two weeks left until moving day, here&#8217;s a list of items to complete:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Reserve a storage unit.</strong> If you need storage space before, during, or after the move, now is the time to book a storage unit or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">use a self-storage solution like Neighbor</a> near your new home.</li>
<li><strong>Touch up paint and surfaces.</strong> Now that your home is mostly packed up, start inspecting rooms from top to bottom for minor damage like scrapes and nail holes. Touch up spots that need it with color-matching paint. Polish countertops, oil wood floors and railings, and clean and shine doorknobs.</li>
<li><strong>Start packing your &#8220;go box.&#8221;</strong> Refer back to the list you made of “go box” items, and start gathering them in one place.</li>
<li><strong>Continue packing your home.</strong> By now you can <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">pack fragile dishware</a>, bulk clothing, books, and remaining items you won&#8217;t need in the next week. Aim to be completely finished with packing your home by the end of this week.</li>
</ul>
<div id="1"></div>
<h2>1 Week Before Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6784 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/08-1-Week-Section-Header.png" alt="1 Week Before Moving Day" width="1792" height="574" /></p>
<p>It&#8217;s now the final week before your move. At this point, your schedule should be locked and loaded, and all that’s left to do is tie up loose ends. If you’ve followed the checklists leading up to this point, nothing has been left to the last minute.</p>
<p>Here&#8217;s what you need to do one week from moving:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Setup utilities at the new house.</strong> Call the utility companies for your new home and make sure accounts are up-to-date and everything is turned on. Make sure to check water, electricity, internet, gas, garbage, and recycling services.</li>
<li><strong>Check the forecast for moving day.</strong> Be prepared for your moving day by knowing exactly what to expect from the weather. With less than a week to go, the forecast should be fairly dependable, but keep an eye on it as the date gets closer. Your moving truck is likely to arrive at your new home later than you will. If you need to delay your drive for a day or two because of bad weather, you probably can — but confirm this with your movers.</li>
<li><strong>Begin defrosting the fridge and freezer.</strong> If you’re taking your fridge with you, make sure to give it at least a full 24 hours to defrost before being loaded onto a moving truck.</li>
<li><strong>Make a checklist for your house cleanup.</strong> Now that everything is packed and you’re almost ready to leave, put all the boxes in one room, and carefully check the rest of the house. Clean each room thoroughly. Sweep, mop, vacuum, polish, and otherwise make the house spotless as you can. For renters, this will get your security deposit back. For homeowners, this will make your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">staging and selling phase</a> much easier.</li>
<li><strong>Take outgoing photos or video.</strong> Before you leave, snap some photos or take a video of your perfectly clean home. This can be for a video tour for prospective buyers, or to protect your security deposit if you’re a renter. Outgoing photos and video are digital proof that the home was in excellent condition when you left it.</li>
<li><strong>Pack everything except your &#8220;go boxes.&#8221;</strong> Everything should be packed by now, with no exceptions. You should be living out of your go boxes for the last few days until you leave to head to your new home.</li>
<li><strong>Do a final donation drop-off.</strong> Now that everything is packed and everything that&#8217;s hazardous or unusable is thrown away, anything that is left that you don&#8217;t want to take with you can go in a donation box. Make your final run to your nearby donation drop-off at this time.</li>
</ul>
<div id="day"></div>
<h2>Final Checklist for Moving Day</h2>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6785 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/09-Moving-Day-Section-Header.png" alt="Moving Day Checklist" width="1792" height="574" /></p>
<p>The big day is finally here! You&#8217;re in the home stretch for a seamless and organized move!</p>
<p>Here’s a final checklist of essential tasks on moving day:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Load the moving truck.</strong> It’s time to move all those boxes and furniture pieces out of your home and onto the truck. Oversee the movers if you hired them to pack the truck for you, or move the boxes yourself if you’re making a more <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/">DIY move</a>. Make sure everything is well-packed and secured on the moving truck.</li>
<li><strong>Pack the car.</strong> Pack your vehicle with all your go boxes, leaving room for any family members who need to ride in the car. If you’re <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">moving with pets</a>, make sure to load them up last.</li>
<li><strong>Coordinate with your movers.</strong> Confirm one last time that the movers are scheduled to arrive at the new house on the right date. Make a plan to keep in touch with them for updates and in case of problems or changes. This is also a good time to make sure you have cash on hand to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">tip your movers</a>.</li>
<li><strong>Do a final walk-thru of your old home.</strong> Go through every room, closet, and cupboard, making sure you haven’t left anything behind. If anything got dusty or scuffed during moving, clean it up.</li>
<li><strong>Get your new keys.</strong> When you arrive at your new home, know how you’re going to get in. If you haven’t picked up your new keys yet, have a plan to receive them as soon as you arrive.</li>
<li><strong>Close and lock up your old home.</strong> Make sure every door and window is closed and locked before you load up your family to head out. If you’re leaving your old keys with someone, do that now.</li>
<li><strong>Travel to your new home.</strong> Whether it’s a quick drive across town, or a multi-day, cross-country road trip, be careful on the drive. Take breaks anytime you feel tired, and don’t plan to drive more in one day than you can handle.</li>
<li><strong>Wait for the movers.</strong> You’re likely to arrive at the new house before the moving truck. Now, live out of your go boxes and wait for the truck to catch up. This can feel like a fun camping activity for the family.</li>
<li><strong>Unpack and settle in.</strong> You did it! The move is complete, and now it’s time to unpack and enjoy your new home after moving.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>PRO MOVING TIP:</strong> Use our <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a> for a checklist for settling in.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>
The moving process doesn’t have to be as stressful as it seems. With this checklist, you can get everything done and have your new home comfortably ready to move in precisely as your moving day arrives. For even more ideas, check out our list of moving and packing tips, and download our free moving resources below.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">The Ultimate Moving Checklist</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Your Ultimate Guide to How to Winterize a House</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 08 Dec 2020 19:00:43 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winter tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[winterizing]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6832</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Harsh winter temperatures have a major effect on everything outdoors, but winter can also affect your home. Learning how to winterize a house will provide you with the information you need to keep your home safe, warm, and free from potential damage. If you&#8217;ve never prepared your home for winter, you may not know where [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">Your Ultimate Guide to How to Winterize a House</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Harsh winter temperatures have a major effect on everything outdoors, but winter can also affect your home. Learning how to winterize a house will provide you with the information you need to keep your home safe, warm, and free from potential damage. If you&#8217;ve never prepared your home for winter, you may not know where to begin. Use this guide to better understand how winter can affect your house and the best techniques for winterization.</p>
<h2>16 Ways Winter Weather Can Affect Your Home</h2>
<p>Freezing temperatures and violent storms can affect your home inside and out. While vacant homes pose a higher risk for weather damage, any unprotected home can face serious damage during the winter months. Here are just a few ways winter weather can damage your home and why knowing how to winterize a house is so important.</p>
<h3>1. Damaged, Broken, or Fallen Gutter Systems</h3>
<p>Fall leaves often clog gutters. Failure to clear these gutters before freezing temperatures hit can spell disaster for your home. When water freezes and snow back up in your gutters, the resulting weight can break gutters loose from your home or cause ice dams. The result can be damage to your roof or siding and leaks, which can cause structural damage over time.</p>
<h3>2. Cracked Foundation</h3>
<p>If your clogged gutters don&#8217;t break free from your home, they can still cause serious damage. A non-functional gutter system can lead to running water and ice buildup around your home. This moisture creates new foundation cracks or targets existing ones, making them larger.</p>
<h3>3. Flooded Basements</h3>
<p>Sump pumps are amazing tools that can keep your basement dry and safe. Heavy snowfall can put pressure on your sump pump’s drain, causing it to back up into your basement.</p>
<h3>4. Leaky Roof</h3>
<p>Improperly insulated attacks can lead to thawing and refreezing of ice on your roof. As slushy snow and ice refreeze along your gutter system, ice dams form, preventing natural drainage. Additional snow and ice have nowhere to go except inside your home.</p>
<h3>5. Rotted Door and Window Frames</h3>
<p>When your door frames are exposed to continual moisture, structural damage can occur. Softening wood can lead to crumbling door frames and entry points for termites in the spring.</p>
<h3>6. Flooded Yards</h3>
<p>Improperly insulated outdoor pipes can lead to big problems surrounding your home. When outdoor pipes and fixtures aren&#8217;t properly insulated or winterized, underground pipes or outdoor wall fixtures can break.</p>
<h3>7. Mold Growth</h3>
<p>Cold air outside and warm air inside provide the perfect conditions for condensation, which often <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-mold-ultimate-guide/">leads to mold</a>. Poorly insulated homes are especially vulnerable to this problem, and mold can exacerbate respiratory issues that naturally occur during the winter.</p>
<h3>8. Cracked and Peeling Exterior Paint</h3>
<p>If your exterior paint is damaged, improperly applied, or sealed incorrectly, cracks and peeling can occur during winter weather. While this damage affects your home&#8217;s appearance, it can also lead to siding damage and potential leaks.</p>
<h3>9. Flooding Inside Your Home</h3>
<p>Burst pipes don&#8217;t only occur outdoors. Improperly insulated walls and ceilings can lead to pipes that freeze and burst inside your home. Burst pipes can cause slow leaks or extreme flooding, which leads to serious wall and structural damage.</p>
<h3>10. Chimney Cracks and Leaks</h3>
<p>While the heat from your fire rarely causes chimney damage, the heating and cooling that occurs with winter weather can lead to the gradual degradation of your chimney. Additionally, if your chimney flashing was installed during cold weather, it can fail to adhere properly, leading to leaks.</p>
<h3>11. Rodent Damage</h3>
<p>When the weather cools outdoors, rodents seek a warm space inside your home. Chimney damage or rotting window or door frames provide easy entry for critters that can damage your home. These pests can eat away at or degrade your home&#8217;s insulation, leading to a variety of winter damage.</p>
<h3>12. Failed HVAC</h3>
<p>When powerful winter storms cause ice and snow buildup on your HVAC&#8217;s exterior unit, an emergency shutdown can occur. This leaves you and your family without heat during the worst possible time and can lead to other damage like frozen pipes.</p>
<h3>13. Damaged Grout</h3>
<p>When grout is exposed to cold, wet temperatures, it can degrade and pull away from the surfaces it&#8217;s designed to protect. When your grout&#8217;s water sealing properties are compromised, the resulting damage can include mold growth and damage to plaster, drywall, and even wood framing.</p>
<h3>14. Gas Leaks</h3>
<p>High winter winds can blow out pilot lights for your furnace and oven, causing a potential gas leak inside your home. Gas leaks cause a variety of dangers for your home, including carbon monoxide poisoning, fire, and even explosion.</p>
<h3>15. Cracked Walls</h3>
<p>Your home&#8217;s heating system can dry out the air in your home. This drier air can be dangerous for plaster walls, causing them to shrink and crack. Maintaining a consistent temperature can help you avoid this problem.</p>
<h3>16. Tree Damage</h3>
<p>Snow and ice build up on tree branches, adding several extra pounds. The extra weight leads to broken branches that can crash down onto your roof and cause significant damage. Even when trees and falling branches aren&#8217;t close enough to hit your home, they can cause damage to your electric lines and lead to a power loss during the coldest months of the year.</p>
<h2>Your Step-by-Step Guide to How to Winterize a House</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6835" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Neighbor-How-to-Winterize-a-House-Man-sealing-window-seams-with-caulk-to-prevent-drafts.jpg" alt="Man sealing window seams with caulk to prevent drafts" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>There are a variety of tasks you&#8217;ll need to accomplish to winterize your home and avoid the potential damage that the weather can cause. Taking steps to keep your home warmer, stronger, and drier will help keep your house in the best shape possible during the frigid winter months. Use this handy guide about how to winterize a house to ensure you&#8217;re fully prepared for whatever Mother Nature has in store this winter.</p>
<h3>Weatherproofing Your Home</h3>
<p>Weatherproofing includes a variety of tasks that help you keep cold outside and heat inside. If you want to start the process of how to winterize a house, minimizing the effects of weather on the interior is a good start. The results not only keep you and your family warmer. They can also help you lower your energy bills. Try these tips to keep your home warmer this winter:</p>
<h4>Install Storm Doors</h4>
<p>The air that seeps in around your doors and windows can keep your furnace running way too often. Storm doors provide double-duty protection by sealing out cold air and keeping moisture from reaching your door frames.</p>
<h4>Weatherstrip the Doors and Windows</h4>
<p>Weather stripping comes in a variety of materials (like vinyl and foam) designed to block cold. These materials may require certain glues or tapes to apply, though some types already have adhesive applied. Follow the manufacturer&#8217;s directions for the correct application of your product.</p>
<h4>Install a Door Sweep</h4>
<p>This handy device seals the gap between the bottom of your door and the threshold to block out cool drafts. You may be required to cut a door sweep to fit your door and use screws or nails to attach the piece in place. Some varieties are designed to simply slide onto the bottom of aluminum doors.</p>
<h4>Caulk Around Windows</h4>
<p>Drafty windows (especially those in your attic) are a common culprit for lost heat during the winter. Check all your windows for drafts and apply caulk around windows to seal out cold and keep heat in.</p>
<h4>Insulate Your Attic</h4>
<p>If you have an unfinished attic or have never checked to see if your space is properly insulated, you could be in for a big surprise. A large amount of your home&#8217;s heat can escape from your attic, causing high energy bills, dangerous ice dams, and leaks. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/insulate-attic-ultimate-guide/">Insulate your attic</a> with the proper materials and thickness for your climate. Your basement and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">attached garage</a> can benefit from insulation as well.</p>
<h3>Winterizing Your Plumbing System</h3>
<p>Freezing temperatures can wreak havoc on your plumbing system, so any plan for how to winterize a house should focus on preventing freezing water. Outdoor lines with remaining water can leave you with a lake in your yard. Improperly insulated walls and pipes can lead to leaks within the walls. Pipes that freeze and burst in walls, ceilings, or basements can lead to flood damage. Read on about how to winterize a house by ensuring your plumbing is winter-ready.</p>
<h4>Learn the Locations of Your Shut-Off Valves</h4>
<p>If you encounter frozen pipes or leaks during the winter, then you need to know how to stop the water flow as quickly as possible. Make sure you know where each shut-off valve is located, including the main valve that shuts off water to your entire home. No matter how much you know about how to winterize a house, something may go wrong. When you already know where the shut-offs are, you can respond faster to problems.</p>
<h4>Insulate Your Pipes</h4>
<p>Exposed pipes in your walls, basement, or crawlspace are more likely to freeze. Use foam sleeves to cover these pipes and protect them against freezing temperatures.</p>
<h4>Disconnect and Store Garden Hoses</h4>
<p>Water that freezes in exterior hoses can rupture your faucet. Disconnect all outdoor hoses, dry them completely, and store them for the winter.</p>
<h4>Winterize Exterior Faucets</h4>
<p>If your outdoor faucets have shut off valves, close them and completely drain the faucet to prevent freezing. If you don&#8217;t have shut off valves, use a foam cover to insulate your outdoor faucets.</p>
<h4>Close the Foundation Vents and Repair Any Broken Basement Windows</h4>
<p>Check your basement thoroughly before winter sets in. Close foundation vents and caulk around windows to prevent drafts that could lead to frozen pipes. Repair cracked or broken windows before temperatures dip below freezing.</p>
<h4>Keep Your Heat On</h4>
<p>Even when you won&#8217;t be home, it&#8217;s essential to keep your thermostat set at 55 degrees to avoid frozen pipes during extremely cold weather.</p>
<h4>Allow the Water to Drip From Faucets When Temperatures Are Below 20 Degrees</h4>
<p>During the coldest nights, all your regular efforts may not be sufficient to keep your pipes safe. Allow cold water to drip or run in a small stream in a few faucets to keep water moving through the system. This movement is usually all you need to avoid frozen pipes.</p>
<h3>How to Winterize a House By Preparing the Roof</h3>
<p>Your roof takes the brunt of all types of winter weather. You probably don&#8217;t think much about the condition of your roof as long as it&#8217;s keeping the rain out. But when winter is on the way, it&#8217;s important to inspect your roof for any dangers that could lead to damage from winter weather. Take these steps to ensure your roof is winter-ready:</p>
<h4>Inspect the Roof</h4>
<p>Look for signs of deterioration, loose or damaged flashing, and clogged valleys. Inspect shingles for wear. Watch for broken, frayed, curled, or missing shingles. If you&#8217;re unsure of your roof&#8217;s condition, or unable to inspect it yourself, contact a professional roofer for an inspection.</p>
<h4>Clear Away Dirt and Debris</h4>
<p>Clear dirt, pine needles, fallen leaves, and other debris from your roof. This type of organic matter can prevent the natural flow of water and snow from your roof and lead to ice dams.</p>
<h4>Check and Clean the Gutters</h4>
<p>Fall and early winter are prime times for clogged gutters. Inspect your gutters for leaves and other debris. Scoop out large clogs and use a water hose to flush out smaller debris from your gutter system.</p>
<h4>Trim Your Trees</h4>
<p>While trees can provide valuable protection against winter wind, dead limbs are a danger to your home. Cut back overhanging branches or any dead or dying tree limbs. These objects can cause roof damage or become dangerous projectiles during winter storms.</p>
<h4>Install Snow Guards</h4>
<p>Snow avalanches from sloping roofs can cause a mess that leaves you spending a quality afternoon with the snow shovel. They can also cause damage to gutters, skylights, and lower roof areas. Installing snow guards will allow snow and ice to melt and gradually drift from your roof in small amounts.</p>
<h4>Inspect the Attic</h4>
<p>Your attic&#8217;s interior can provide a wealth of clues to the condition of your roof. Check for stains on ceilings and walls, mold and mildew, and wet spots that signal leaks. While you&#8217;re up there, take a look at the windows and ensure there are no cracks or drafts.</p>
<h3>Prep Your Heating System for Winter</h3>
<p>When winter delivers its worst, your heating system should be at its best. All heating systems can benefit from an annual winter inspection to ensure nothing is clogged, worn, or damaged. Maintaining your heating system as a key part of how to winterize a house is also a great way to improve indoor air quality during the winter months. Take these steps to prepare your heating system for winter:</p>
<h4>Check Your Chimney for Buildup or Blockage</h4>
<p>Creosote buildup in your fireplace and chimney can be dangerous. Additionally, if your chimney cap is damaged or missing, it&#8217;s not uncommon for birds, bees, or other small creatures to take up residence in your chimney while it&#8217;s not in use. If you&#8217;re concerned about the condition of your fireplace, flue, or chimney, call a chimney sweep for assistance before using your fireplace.</p>
<h4>Optimize Your Thermostat</h4>
<p>A programmable thermostat is a great tool as you develop your plan for how to winterize a house. It allows you to customize your heating system for the most efficient heating schedule, even when you aren&#8217;t home. You can program the thermostat for one temperature when you&#8217;re home and another while you&#8217;re away.</p>
<h4>Schedule an Energy Assessment</h4>
<p>Many power companies provide free services to help you detect areas that cause excessive energy loss during winter. An energy assessment will help you understand specific changes that can help you keep your home warmer and save money on energy bills.</p>
<h4>Check Your Detectors</h4>
<p>Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are essential safety measures no matter how you heat your home. Inspect all the detectors in your home and replace the batteries as needed.</p>
<h4>Get Professional Help</h4>
<p>Most homeowners are not heating experts. Your HVAC technician, chimney sweep, or electrician can provide you with a professional inspection to ensure your heating system is working properly and safely for the season ahead.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a House:</h4>
<p>If you haven&#8217;t replaced your furnace or central air filters within the last three months, now is the time to take care of them. Your furnace will run more efficiently and provide more heat with clean filters. Filters should be replaced at least once each season.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Winterize a Vacant Home</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6836" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Neighbor-How-to-Winterize-a-House-Man-draining-and-inspecting-a-hot-water-heater-before-winter-vacancy.jpg" alt="A technician draining and inspecting a hot water heater before winter vacancy" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Knowing how to winterize a house that&#8217;s vacant is similar to winterizing a home you plan on staying in. But if you&#8217;re responsible for a home that will be vacant during the winter months, you&#8217;ll have to take extra steps to avoid potential weather-related disasters. While many weatherproofing techniques will act as useful safety measures, additional steps should be taken to secure a home that won&#8217;t be used during the winter. Take these steps to ensure your vacant home is safe during harsh winter weather:</p>
<h3>Make Use of Utilities</h3>
<p>Turning off the heat and electricity may seem like a great way to save money on your heating bill, but it&#8217;s not really the most advisable option. Many of the components of any modern home are designed to be kept at room temperature. While it may seem like a waste of money, keeping the heat on at a low level could save you hundreds of dollars in the long run. 50 or 55 degrees should be enough to keep pipes from freezing.</p>
<h3>Prep the Plumbing</h3>
<p>When water freezes, it expands, leading to burst pipes and flooding. While your heat provides a useful function in your vacant home, there&#8217;s no need to have running water available. Shutting off the water and draining the system is a great way to avoid returning to a flooded home next spring. Use this checklist to ensure you don&#8217;t miss an essential step of the plumbing winterization process:</p>
<ul>
<li>Shut off the main water valve. Then turn off the water pump and the water heater.</li>
<li>Open all valves and faucets to drain any remaining water in the system. These taps will remain open while the plumbing system is not in use.</li>
<li>Drain your water heater. If your water doesn&#8217;t have a floor drain, you&#8217;ll need to attach a garden hose to drain the tank completely.</li>
<li>Drain any water that is left in the holding tank. Ensure that all of the water is drained, and add antifreeze to the jet pump case.</li>
<li>Flush the toilets to remove as much water as possible from toilet tanks and bowls. Add antifreeze to tanks and bowls after flushing.</li>
<li>Check the sink and tub drains to ensure no water remains in taps, and add antifreeze to the drains to eliminate freezing risks from leftover water.</li>
<li>Insulate all exposed pipes to prevent freezing (and add an extra layer of protection).</li>
<li>Inspect the outside of the home. Seal exterior cracks and make sure the crawl space is properly insulated.</li>
</ul>
<p>If you&#8217;re uncertain about your ability to successfully winterize your plumbing system, contact a plumber for help.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Winterize a House:</h4>
<p>Never use automobile antifreeze to winterize your home plumbing system since it&#8217;s highly toxic. Instead, use RV antifreeze that is non-toxic and non-flammable.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Install Protection</h3>
<p>Storm doors and windows are very effective for their intended purpose. Install storm doors, secure plywood over windows, and close your shutters. Check each window (including those in the attic and basement) to ensure they&#8217;re closed and locked.</p>
<h3>Check Gutters and Roofs</h3>
<p>Clogged gutters and minor roof damage can lead to serious damage when snow and ice are added to the equation. Your vacant home should have a roof inspection with the same care as the home you occupy. Also, take time to inspect the attic for potential signs of leaks. Roof damage should be repaired before you leave your home vacant during the winter.</p>
<h3>Stay Unplugged</h3>
<p>While utilities can be useful to keep things cozy, appliances and other tools should stay unplugged while the home is unoccupied. Heavy snow and ice combined with harsh winter winds are notorious for power outages and surges that can short-circuit electronic devices. In an unoccupied home, these occurrences are likely to go unnoticed or even lead to a fire.</p>
<h3>Bring Everything Inside</h3>
<p>Take outdoor furniture and decorations inside, or find a suitable <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">storage solution</a>. Avoid leaving items outdoors, where they could degrade or become projectiles in a violent storm.</p>
<h3>Check the Sump Pump</h3>
<p>Your sump pump is designed to remove excess water from your home to prevent flooding. It&#8217;s easy to assume your sump pump is working properly. However, a small clog can become a big deal when the weight of snow compromises your drain pipe. Make sure your sump pump is working its best before winter weather arrives.</p>
<h3>Close off the Fireplace</h3>
<p>A fireplace in use sends heat and smoke upwards through the chimney. A vacant fireplace that loses its chimney cap can become an inlet for rain, snow, and ice. It can also create a secure haven for animals to make a nest or even enter your home.</p>
<h3>Arm the Security System and Alert Neighbors</h3>
<p>Protecting your home in your absence is an important part of your winterization schedule. When your neighbors are aware your home will be vacant, they&#8217;re likely to notice unexpected intruders on the property. If you have a security system, ensure it is armed and working properly before you leave.</p>
<p>Learning how to winterize a house pays off in many ways. Besides keeping your home warmer during the winter months, you can save money on your energy bills and avoid potential damage to your home. Make sure you also protect other large assets like your <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">RV </a>or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">boat </a>with our winterization tips.</p>
<h2>Additional Winterization Resources</h2>
<p><ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul><br />
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">Your Ultimate Guide to How to Winterize a House</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Neighbor Expands Commercial Real Estate Footprint, Adds New Self-Storage Space to New York City</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/neighbor-expands-commercial-real-estate-footprint-adds-new-self-storage-space-new-york-city/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/neighbor-expands-commercial-real-estate-footprint-adds-new-self-storage-space-new-york-city/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Mon, 07 Dec 2020 16:31:44 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6881</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>SALT LAKE CITY, Dec. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ &#8212; Neighbor, the self-storage marketplace disruptor, today announced they are inviting commercial property owners across New York City to list their vacant space as self-storage on Neighbor&#8217;s platform as an alternative way to cover mortgages and building expenses in lieu of traditional tenants. In light of surging consumer [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/neighbor-expands-commercial-real-estate-footprint-adds-new-self-storage-space-new-york-city/">Neighbor Expands Commercial Real Estate Footprint, Adds New Self-Storage Space to New York City</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>SALT LAKE CITY, Dec. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ &#8212; <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">Neighbor</a>, the self-storage marketplace disruptor, today announced they are inviting commercial property owners across New York City to list their vacant space as self-storage on Neighbor&#8217;s platform as an alternative way to cover mortgages and building expenses in lieu of traditional tenants. In light of surging consumer demand, Neighbor is quickly adding new square footage to its platform and offering commercial landlords a lifeline to keep their lights on.<br />
<img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-6885" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/stuf-ny-exterior.jpg" alt="Exterior of New York Stuf location" width="1700" height="1275" /></p>
<p>In 2020, self-storage became an essential business and service for Americans. The <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/self-storage-industry-statistics/">$40B industry</a> opened doors for people who wanted to temporarily relocate and allowed people to clear out a room for an office, home gym, Zoom school or a millennial returning home for quarantine. With facilities in major cities like New York operating at well over 90% occupancy, the existing self-storage supply can&#8217;t possibly meet the skyrocketing demand.</p>
<p>As a result, Neighbor continues to expand its partnerships with commercial landlords, who are struggling to secure tenants by converting their commercial space into self-storage. Opening today, Neighbor is rolling out its <a href="https://www.mybrooklynstorage.com" target="_blank">first commercial space in New York City</a>. In partnership with <a href="https://bridgetonholdings.com/" target="_blank">Bridgeton Holdings</a> and Stuf, the owner and operators of the building in Neighbor&#8217;s debut NYC commercial property, the ground floor of the mixed-use building in Brooklyn&#8217;s Navy Yard (15 Vanderbilt) has been transformed into a self-storage center. Across the country, Neighbor is inviting residential and commercial property owners the opportunity to cover their mortgage and expenses in a temporary or permanent capacity by renting space on the peer-to-peer self-storage platform.</p>
<p>&#8220;At a time when space is highly valued, we identified a perfect market opportunity to leverage underutilized space &#8211; in homes, garages, driveways or vacant offices, retail storefronts and even parking lots &#8211; as turn-key self-storage solutions for consumers,&#8221; said Joseph Woodbury, CEO and cofounder of Neighbor. &#8220;Both business owners and homeowners are making hundreds or thousands of dollars in monthly revenue with Neighbor, providing the much-needed stimulus funds they&#8217;re not getting from the federal government.&#8221;</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-6886" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/stuf-sf-interior.jpg" alt="Interior of San Francisco Stuf location" width="1700" height="1134" /></p>
<p>Bridgeton Holdings CEO Atit Jariwala turned to Neighbor after a Brooklyn restaurant tenant vacated during the pandemic. &#8220;With an uncertain economy and a precipitous rise in commercial vacancies in New York City, it was highly possible this space could sit empty for the foreseeable future. Upon experiencing the speed people snapped up our spaces listed on Neighbor in San Francisco and with self-storage in such high demand, we determined it was a safe bet to repurpose the space and use that income to cover the building&#8217;s expenses,&#8221; said Jariwala.</p>
<p>The most recent property the investment firm listed on Neighbor&#8217;s platform, a vacant floor of an office building in San Francisco&#8217;s SoMA district, reached 85% occupancy in less than three months.</p>
<p>2020 has been a record-breaking year for Neighbor. The platform&#8217;s traffic and reservations have skyrocketed more than 7X since 2019. To help account for the increased activity on the platform, Neighbor developed new features designed to help hosts price their space more effectively and <a href="https://help.neighbor.com/en/articles/4570468-quick-move-in">improve speed time to rental</a>.</p>
<p><strong>About Neighbor</strong><br />
Founded in 2017, Neighbor is a peer-to-peer self-storage company based in the Silicon Slopes of Lehi, Utah. The company connects people who have unused space in their garages, attics, basements and driveways to renters who are looking for affordable storage. Neighbor benefits renters by providing safer, more accessible storage for half the price of a traditional self-storage unit, while giving hosts the opportunity to earn thousands of dollars per year from their unused space. Neighbor&#8217;s team helps keep the connection safe, easy and friendly and provides an unprecedented $25,000 renter guarantee for items stored and a $1 million host liability guarantee so that good neighbors everywhere can help each other out. In January 2020, Neighbor closed a $10 million Series A funding round led by Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz.</p>
<p>Learn more about Neighbor at <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">neighbor.com</a>.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/neighbor-expands-commercial-real-estate-footprint-adds-new-self-storage-space-new-york-city/">Neighbor Expands Commercial Real Estate Footprint, Adds New Self-Storage Space to New York City</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>The Ultimate Guide to Fall Lawn Care</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-fall-lawn-care/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-fall-lawn-care/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 03 Dec 2020 19:00:25 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home maintenance]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[lawn care]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[lifestyle tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[yard maintenance]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6826</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>For most people, the idea of lawn care evokes images of sweltering summer days and quality time with the lawnmower. Surprisingly, fall lawn care provides some of the most important benefits for a healthy lawn throughout the year. Whether your lawn will be facing harsh winter weather or a comfortably mild season, your grass requires [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-fall-lawn-care/">The Ultimate Guide to Fall Lawn Care</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>For most people, the idea of lawn care evokes images of <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/cool-down-your-house-10-effective-ways-to-cool-your-house-this-summer/">sweltering summer days</a> and quality time with the lawnmower. Surprisingly, fall lawn care provides some of the most important benefits for a healthy lawn throughout the year. Whether your lawn will be facing harsh winter weather or a comfortably mild season, your grass requires a different care schedule during fall. Learn about the importance of fall lawn care and the steps you should take to prepare your yard for winter.</p>
<h2>Why Is Fall Lawn Care Important?</h2>
<p>Fall lawn care provides your yard with the preparations it needs to stay healthy over the winter. When your grass and soil get the sustenance they need for a healthy winter, the payoff is a naturally beautiful lawn come spring.</p>
<p>It&#8217;s a common belief that grass only needs care during peak growing season. While it&#8217;s true that your lawn needs a lot of care during the summer, fall lawn care is equally important. Taking care of certain tasks during the fall when your grass is entering dormancy will allow treatments to work more effectively, providing you with a beautiful lawn next year.</p>
<p>Following a specific schedule will ensure that you offer the best fall lawn care techniques without damaging tender grass or overworking your soil. Early fall lawn care tasks include fertilization, thatch removal, and weed control. Many tasks can be continued into mid-fall, including mowing and watering as necessary, aeration, and overseeding. Late fall lawn care tasks prepare your yard for winter, and generally include winterizing, debris removal, and mulching.</p>
<h2>Your Step-by-Step Guide to Fall Lawn Care</h2>
<p>If you think the end of summer means the end of lawn care, think again! The steps you take in the fall make a huge difference in the appearance of your lawn when spring arrives. Whether you&#8217;re already familiar with the details of fall lawn care, or you&#8217;re new to the idea, use this checklist to make sure you take all the right actions to prepare your lawn for healthy winter hibernation.</p>
<h3>1. Remove the Leaves</h3>
<p>It&#8217;s a common myth that fallen leaves will insulate your lawn for winter. This isn&#8217;t true. A thick layer of leaves blocks sunlight, traps moisture, and eliminates air circulation. Leaf management can be accomplished with various tools depending on the volume of leaves you have and how much time you&#8217;re willing to invest. Grab the rake to pile leaves, or if you&#8217;re short on time, use the leaf blower. A thin layer of leaves can be mulched into small pieces and left where it lies.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Fall Lawn Care Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Leaf removal must be repeated several times throughout the fall. Leaf removal is Step 1, but it&#8217;s also Step 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, etc. Raking and disposing of leaves more often allows sunshine and fresh air to reach your grass and soil.</p></blockquote>
<h3>2. Test Your Soil</h3>
<p>Your soil needs nutrients to grow healthy grass. Soil testing provides you with the information you need to feed your lawn to prepare for winter correctly. Testing will help you understand your soil&#8217;s pH and nutrition. Testing helps remove the guesswork from adding the proper nutrients and fertilizer when the time comes.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Fall Lawn Care Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Testing bare spots separately can help you repair trouble spots for a seamless lawn for the next growing season.</p></blockquote>
<h3>3. Keep Mowing</h3>
<p>Many homeowners stop mowing grass when growth slows in the fall. But mowing to the correct height for winter hibernation is an important step in your fall lawn care routine. Surprisingly, grasses often found in northern climates like Kentucky Bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, and many types of fescue need to be cut shorter during the fall. Grass that&#8217;s left too long in winter can encourage mold growth and diseases. Gradually reduce the grass length each time you mow until you reach a mowing height of 3 inches or even 2.5.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Fall Lawn Care Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Your lawnmower can do double duty when leaves are on the ground. Mulching leaves into dime-size pieces can save you from an afternoon with the rake.</p></blockquote>
<h3>4. Remove Thatch</h3>
<p>Summer heat and a busy mowing schedule lead to a thick layer of organic matter between soil and grass. This thatch can benefit thin lawns but can cause problems for healthy turf. When thatch becomes more than a half-inch thick, it can limit water movement and encourage disease. To remove excess thatch, use a handheld rake, vertical mower, or a dethatcher. It&#8217;s important to cut into the thatch layer to pull it up effectively.</p>
<h3>5. Loosen the Soil</h3>
<p>Aerating your lawn is essential to provide compacted soil with a breath of fresh air. You may not need to aerate your soil every year, but compacted soil can inhibit root system growth and block water from reaching deep into the soil. Tools for aeration vary from manual footwear with spikes on the soles to machines called core aerators that remove plugs of soil. All types of aerators leave holes in the soil for easier introduction of air and water. Aeration right before fertilization can help you get essential nutrients directly to the soil.</p>
<h3>6. Feed Your Lawn</h3>
<p>Dormancy for grass is similar to hibernation for animals. Adding the right nutrients before winter&#8217;s first frost prepares your grass for healthy hibernation and increased spring growth. For instance, potassium in lawn fertilizer helps your grass survive cold temperatures. Your completed soil tests will help you understand the right techniques for repairing bare spots and adding the nutrients your entire lawn needs to stay healthy. Always apply fertilizer as directed on the package.</p>
<h4>Tips for Fertilizer Safety and Success:</h4>
<ul>
<li>Fill the spreader in the driveway to avoid spillage that will overexpose and kill the grass.</li>
<li>Seal partially used bags of fertilizer with tape and store them in a dry place.</li>
<li>Cover reseeded areas with plastic to avoid burning tender seedlings when you fertilize.</li>
<li>Rinse out the garden spreader and allow it to dry completely before storage to avoid rusting and freezing of metal parts.</li>
</ul>
<h3>7. Overseed and Repair Bare Spots</h3>
<p>While many people wait until early spring to spread seed, fall conditions are actually ideal for grass germination. Thin lawns that receive overseeding treatments in the fall will reward you with thick, healthy spring grass. A dense lawn is also an ideal defense against weed growth. Whether you&#8217;re repairing bare spots or giving your entire lawn a boost, overseed at least 45 days before the first frost to ensure tender grass has a chance to take hold. Seeds can be protected until germination by covering your lawn with a thin layer of mulch or hay.</p>
<h3>8. Keep Watering</h3>
<p>A common mistake of lawn care is the elimination of watering during the fall season. Increased rain can help your watering schedule, but it&#8217;s important to remember that healthy lawns need an inch of water each week. Use a rain gauge to keep up with how much natural water your lawn is getting and continue to supplement that amount into October. Besides keeping your existing grass healthy, a regular watering schedule is essential for new grass growth from overseeding.</p>
<h3>9. Stay Ahead of Weeds</h3>
<p>As grass continues to grow in the fall, weeds do the same. Tackling weeds in the fall can be the key to getting rid of annual and perennial weeds that plague your yard and gardens. Many common problem weeds like dandelion, clover, crabgrass, and other broadleaf plants thrive in the fall. Using herbicides that include a pre- and post-emergent treatment will eliminate a variety of invasive plants in one step. Targeted spot treatments may be required to tackle tough weeds.</p>
<h3>10. Cleanup and Storage</h3>
<p>Proper care and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/garage-storage-ideas/">storage of lawn furniture, decorations, and tools</a> is an essential part of your lawn care routine. When the weather is no longer suitable for the use of outdoor furniture, proper cleaning and storage can extend the life of these pieces. Rinse away dust and dirt with a water hose. Clean any hard surfaces with a sponge or cloth and mild dish detergent, and wash the cushions or cushion covers as directed by the label. Ensure that all furniture is completely dry before covering for winter storage.</p>
<p>While you&#8217;ll use your lawnmower and other tools well into the fall season, you&#8217;ll need to take care to store these tools properly before winter sets in. Take the time to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">winterize machines like your lawnmower</a> and any other tools that use gas and other fluids. Rinse and dry hand tools before storing for the winter to prolong the life of these tools.</p>
<h2>Fall Lawn Care Tips for Warm Weather Lawns</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6828" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Neighbor.com-Fall-Lawn-Care-Clearing-Away-Fall-Leaves-into-a-Bag.jpg" alt="someone clearing away leaves into a green waste bag" width="918" height="611" /></p>
<p>Lawns that face mild winters require different levels of care than lawns that hibernate during the fall and winter seasons. Warm weather grasses like Bermuda grass, Zoysia grass, and centipede grass require different care than cool climate grasses. Take these steps to keep your warm weather lawn healthy during the fall and winter seasons.</p>
<h3>1. Test the Soil</h3>
<p>No matter where your property is located, your lawn needs essential nutrients. Soil testing benefits all grass types by helping you understand what nutrients are missing. Making the recommended corrections now will put you one step closer to a beautiful yard in the spring.</p>
<h3>2. Stop Fertilizing</h3>
<p>Before winter frost arrives, you need to let your lawn know it&#8217;s time for a dormant season. Six to eight weeks before the first frost, your lawn should have its last feeding. The continuation of fertilizer can actually make your grass more vulnerable to winter temperatures.</p>
<h3>3. Spread Winter Seed</h3>
<p>Overseeding for the winter season takes on a different meaning for warmer climates. Instead of overseeding for thinning lawns, spread a cool season grass seed like perennial ryegrass to avoid a brown, dormant winter lawn. Time winter seeding with the loss of color in warm season grasses.</p>
<h3>4. Skip Thatch Removal and Aeration</h3>
<p>While these tasks are useful for creating healthy lawns, saving them for spring is your best bet in warmer climates. Dethatching and aeration can be hard on grasses. Taking care of these tasks in the spring when the grass is actively growing can help your lawn bounce back from potential damage. These tasks can be followed by overseeding thin lawns.</p>
<h3>5. Customize Your Watering Schedule</h3>
<p>If you don&#8217;t seed for winter color, you can let rainfall take over much of your watering schedule. As lawns grow dormant, you only need to continue your watering schedule while the grass is still growing. If you seed for a winter lawn, continue your watering schedule as needed to provide your lawn with one inch of water each week.</p>
<h3>6. Attack Weeds</h3>
<p>Dormant lawns make weeds an easy target. Spot treat these easy-to-see weeds with a post-emergent treatment designed for actively growing weeds. Your best choice will be a weed killer that handles a broad range of weeds in one treatment.</p>
<h3>7. Manage Leaves</h3>
<p>There are a couple of ways to manage leaves that can improve the health of your lawn. If your lawn isn&#8217;t subject to heavy leaf cover, mulching leaves can act as additional fertilizer for your growing grass. If you typically experience a heavy cover of leaves, using a rake or leaf blower is the best way to allow your lawn to get the necessary sunlight and water movement to remain healthy. Clear away leaves as often as needed during the fall season.</p>
<h2>Fall Prep for Flower Beds and Gardens</h2>
<p>Your garden needs special care for proper winter hibernation and healthy spring growth. Whether you grow vegetables or flowers and colorful plants, preparing your gardens and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/make-raised-garden-bed/">raised beds</a> for winter will improve their condition next year. Take these steps to prepare your flower beds and gardens for the fall and winter season.</p>
<h3>1. Deadhead and Clean</h3>
<p>As summer plants die out, it&#8217;s important to remove plant waste. Remove dying blooms from plants that are still growing. Clear away rotted, dead, or dying plants. As perennials begin to die out, cut away brown, rotting plant parts and only leave healthy growth behind. While organic matter can provide some nutrients for the soil, a heavy mat of dead and dying vegetation can rob the soil of air and proper hydration.</p>
<h3>2. Remove Weeds</h3>
<p>Invasive weeds that remain in place during the winter will thrive when spring arrives. Tackling invasive weeds throughout the fall will help you avoid dealing with these plants in the spring. Pulling up weeds is an efficient means of disposal, but it can be labor-intensive if you have a large garden. The use of an appropriate herbicide may be needed, as well.</p>
<h3>3. Trim and Prune</h3>
<p>Shrubs and perennials will survive the winter in most climates. Proper fall care will help ensure these plants look their best next spring. Trim away dead or dying blooms, branches, and leaves to eliminate the chance of extended damage and debris during the winter season. Avoid pruning hardy plants like shrub roses to allow them to go into a dormant state naturally. Instead, leave roses on the shrub, so they can turn into hips and produce seeds, signaling the end of the growing season.</p>
<h3>4. Plant Perennials and Spring Blooming Bulbs</h3>
<p>Bulbs that will bloom in spring can start a healthy root system in the fall. In fact, in many climates, fall is a better time to plant than spring. As the air cools and the soil remains warm, new plants will concentrate growth on the root system instead of growing foliage and flowers. Plant your spring bulbs during early and mid-fall to have thriving plants next spring.</p>
<h3>5. Plant Cover Crops</h3>
<p>Using crops during winter can provide a variety of benefits for your soil. Cover crops can help insulate roots and bulbs below the surface. Many of these crops also add essential nutrients to the soil. Select cover crops that work with your climate and meet your needs. Some cover crops are designed to prevent winter erosion. Others perform tasks like adding nitrogen to the soil and managing pests.</p>
<h3>6. Winterize Summer Bulbs</h3>
<p>Taking proper care of your bulbs can mean they last longer than only one season. Dahlias, gladioli, and other frost-sensitive bulbs should be dug up in the fall and replanted in spring. Store bulbs in a paper bag in a cool, dry place to prepare them for spring planting.</p>
<h3>7. Mulch</h3>
<p>Mulch provides the root systems of your plants with much-needed protection against winter temperatures. This versatile covering will also protect tender plants from excessive heat when spring arrives. In some climates, a mulch layer can protect bulbs and eliminate the necessity of digging them up each fall. A layer of organic mulch provides benefits and nutrients for all types of gardens.</p>
<h2>DIY Winterization Tips for a Healthy Yard</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6829" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Neighbor.com-Fall-Lawn-Care-Woman-Trimming-Fruit-Tree-for-Late-Fall.jpg" alt="young woman trimming a fruit tree in the late fall" width="1255" height="835" /></p>
<p>Fall is the season to prepare for harsh winter weather. Besides preparing your soil and grass for this weather, it&#8217;s essential to take care of the other features that keep your yard healthy and comfortable. Take these steps to prepare your entire outdoor space for a safe and healthy winter season.</p>
<h3>Check and Clean Gutters</h3>
<p>Your gutters provide a way to direct water away from your home and avoid standing water in the yard. During the fall, they often become clogged with leaves and other falling debris. Find a partner and use a ladder to inspect your gutters safely. Scoop out large debris and place them into a bucket or drop them to the ground. Flush out debris with a hose and watch for leaks so that they can be repaired before winter.</p>
<h3>Prepare Decks and Pools for Winter</h3>
<p>Outdoor living spaces are more popular than ever. Taking care of the elements that make up your outdoor living space can give them a longer lifespan. For example, properly <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-printable-guide-to-pool-maintenance-for-your-home/">winterize your pool</a>. Take the time to give your deck a fall cleaning. Cover any appliances, furniture, or other features that are permanently installed on your landscape to eliminate the dangers caused by falling debris and harsh winter weather.</p>
<h3>Fall Tree Care</h3>
<p>Your trees are an important part of your lawn. Unfortunately, they can be dangerous when winter freezes and storms arrive, unless they&#8217;ve had the proper care. After leaves have fallen, search for dead, broken, or crossed branches that need to be removed. Fertilize tree roots and replace the mulch cover around the base of young trees to protect tender root systems. Water the tree roots until temperatures dip below 40 degrees. Investigate your trees and shrubs throughout the fall. Always remember to properly dispose of the resulting debris to eliminate dangerous projectiles and tripping risks.</p>
<h3>Winterize Your Sprinkler System</h3>
<p>Many homeowners use a sprinkler system well into fall. Before the first freeze arrives, it&#8217;s essential to winterize your system to protect against damaged parts and burst pipes. This is a service that may be provided by your landscaper. However, with the right techniques, it&#8217;s a job you can accomplish yourself.</p>
<p>Begin by shutting off the supply of water to the system. There are three ways to eliminate water from your sprinkler system. The process you choose will depend on the type of system you have. For sprinkler systems with manual valves, open all valves to allow water to drain completely from the system. When the system is drained, close the valves. Some systems have automatic valves that allow you to automatically drain water by running one of the sprinkler heads to reduce pressure in the system. Check valves will need to be drained separately.</p>
<p>If you have the proper knowledge, tools, and experience, it&#8217;s possible to completely dry out your irrigation system with the introduction of compressed air. It&#8217;s important to note that this method can be dangerous without the correct procedure, safety precautions, and for certain sprinklers. You will need an air compressor and the proper coupling to attach the hose to your irrigation system for this method.</p>
<h3>Prepare for Snow Cover</h3>
<p>Areas that experience considerable snowfall each year can have dangerous obstacles in their yards. Remove large rocks and other debris from large spaces. Roll up garden hoses and properly store them indoors to avoid unseen tripping hazards. Plan clear paths to create trails without obstacles for your snowblower to encounter when you least expect it.</p>
<p>Fall lawn care is an easy and effective way to prepare your yard for the upcoming spring season and protect your property against harsh winter weather. Following this guide to fall lawn care will help you eliminate many spring chores and make it easier to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/landscaping-tips-for-beginners-and-first-time-homeowners/">create a yard that&#8217;s healthy and beautiful</a> throughout the entire year.</p>
<h2>Winterization Resources</h2>
<ul>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/prepare-rv-for-outdoor-winter-storage/">How to Winterize an RV</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-car-ultimate-guide/">How to Winterize a Car</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-a-boat/">How to Winterize a Boat</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-camper-or-travel-trailer/">How to Winterize a Camper or Travel Trailer</a></li>
	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-your-motorcycle-find-storage/">How to Winterize a Motorcycle</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-winterize-lawn-mowers/">How to Winterize Lawn Mowers</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-insulate-a-garage-door/">How to Insulate a Garage Door</a></li>
 	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-how-to-winterize-a-house/">How to Winterize a House</a></li>
  	<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/winterize-sprinkler-system-essential-guide/">How to Winterize a Sprinkler System</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-fall-lawn-care/">The Ultimate Guide to Fall Lawn Care</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Move a Treadmill: A Comprehensive Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-treadmill-comprehensive-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-treadmill-comprehensive-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 26 Nov 2020 19:00:26 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home gym]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6738</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Any move requires creativity, flexibility, and a smart, organized approach. When it comes to relocating heavy and sizable equipment, you have your work cut out for you. Figuring out how to move a treadmill takes time. If you don&#8217;t want to damage your drywall and furniture, pull a muscle, or scratch the equipment, you have [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-treadmill-comprehensive-guide/">How to Move a Treadmill: A Comprehensive Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Any move requires creativity, flexibility, and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-and-packing-tips-the-ultimate-guide-to-relocating-your-home/">a smart, organized approach</a>. When it comes to relocating heavy and sizable equipment, you have your work cut out for you. Figuring out how to move a treadmill takes time. If you don&#8217;t want to damage your drywall and furniture, pull a muscle, or scratch the equipment, you have to prepare for the job. We&#8217;ve created this guide to help you move your treadmill quickly and painlessly.</p>
<h2>Step #1: Check the Weight and Size of the Treadmill</h2>
<p>Before moving the treadmill, try to find the user&#8217;s manual. It contains two pieces of important information:</p>
<ul>
<li>Weight and size</li>
<li>Folding and locking instructions</li>
</ul>
<p>If you can&#8217;t find the owner&#8217;s manual, search for it online. If your folding treadmill doesn&#8217;t have a locking mechanism, you need to invest in ropes or straps to hold it together during the move.</p>
<p>The owner&#8217;s manual usually offers clear moving instructions that generally have to do with disassembling or folding the treadmill. Some treadmills may have wheels to facilitate the relocation.</p>
<p>If a treadmill is heavier than 45 pounds, you may need two people to move it. For heavy treadmills over 100 pounds, you may need three or more assistants. So check the size (width and length) of the treadmill, especially if it&#8217;s non-foldable. Make sure it can pass safely through all the doorways, including the elevator entrance, on the way to its new location. Sometimes it&#8217;s easier to unhinge a door then disassemble a treadmill.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Treadmill:</h4>
<p>Consider renting a furniture dolly. By renting a furniture dolly, you can avoid the hassle of inviting several people to help you. It can also minimize the strain on your muscles when you are setting up fitness equipment in <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/where-are-the-woman-caves/">your own private mini gym</a>. This piece of equipment will be useful throughout your move.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step #2: Prepare the Treadmill for Disassembly and Moving</h2>
<p>Figuring out how to move a treadmill starts with preparations. You need to unplug the equipment and follow the folding instructions from the owner&#8217;s manual.</p>
<h3>Explore the Treadmill&#8217;s Moving Parts</h3>
<p>If your treadmill is non-foldable, it might have some parts that you can adjust for easy transportation. You might be able to partially disassemble the treadmill (or at least remove the console). Check the owner&#8217;s manual for information.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Treadmill:</h4>
<p>Find the safety key before you begin folding up your treadmill. This small, removable part locks into the equipment and holds everything in place. Don&#8217;t forget to lock the treadmill with the safety key so it doesn&#8217;t unfold at the most unexpected moment.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Buy the Necessary Supplies</h3>
<p>Invest in ropes, straps, and moving blankets to ensure the safety of the surrounding walls and furniture during the move.<br />
Treadmills are generally heavy and hard to move perfectly. Wrap the handrails and the frame in soft blankets. Then, if you hit anything while relocating the equipment, the moving blankets will soften the impact. Meanwhile, ropes or straps can hold the machine in place while it&#8217;s on the dolly.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Treadmill:</h4>
<p>If you aren&#8217;t sure how to move a treadmill safely, then you may want to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">hire professional movers</a>. This could save you time and worry while keeping your back safe from injury.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step #3: Lift the Treadmill Safely</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6739" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Couple-working-together-to-carefully-move-heavy-object.jpg" alt="Couple working together to carefully move heavy object" width="1258" height="834" /></p>
<p>Whether you are using a furniture dolly or planning to move the treadmill on your own, you need to <a href="https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/multimedia/back-pain/sls-20076866" target="_blank">lift it properly</a>. Never lift the machine with your back. You could sustain a serious injury. Follow these steps to protect yourself as you lift any heavy equipment:</p>
<ul>
<li>Stand straight up next to the treadmill with your feet shoulder-width apart.</li>
<li>Squat down as close to the treadmill as you can. Bend at the hips and knees. If the treadmill is extremely heavy, put one knee on the floor and the other in front of you, bent at 90°.</li>
<li>Start lifting the treadmill upward slowly. Maintain a good posture by looking ahead, keeping your back straight, sticking your chest out, and moving your shoulders back. Poor posture can lead to muscle strains, headaches, and heart issues.</li>
<li>When lifting the treadmill, straighten your hips and knees but not your back.</li>
<li>Hold the treadmill close to your body. Don&#8217;t extend your hands or lift them above the shoulder level.</li>
</ul>
<p>You need to set the treadmill down intermittently, but don&#8217;t bend over. No matter how hard it is to carry, bending your back to let go could lead to injuries. Put the treadmill down in the moving truck by bending your knees and hips while maintaining a good posture.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Treadmill:</h4>
<p>When planning how to move a treadmill without a dolly, expect it to take some time. Any sudden movements, jerks, and drops could lead to injuries.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step #4: Transport the Treadmill</h2>
<p>You need to plan how to move the treadmill to its destination without hitting other objects along the way. You may have to unhinge doors or remove rugs for the dolly to pass through safely. Incorporate these tips into your plan:</p>
<ul>
<li>Clear the way so there is enough space for you to pass with the treadmill. It&#8217;s an excellent opportunity to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-things/">declutter your home</a>.</li>
<li>If you are carrying the treadmill without a dolly, ask someone to direct you.</li>
<li>Move the treadmill in stages. Make rest stops to prevent injuries.</li>
</ul>
<p>Just like you prepared your moving path from your old home, it’s important to make sure you have a clear path to the treadmill’s destination. This can be tricky if you’re moving it upstairs or you’ve <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-renovate-your-basement/">renovated your basement into a home gym</a>, so measure the doorways and any corners you’ll need to turn.</p>
<p>Once you bring the treadmill to the new location, follow the above steps in reverse to unload, unwrap, and install it.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Treadmill:</h4>
<p>At the new location, plug the equipment in and test it on the lowest setting to make sure everything is working properly after the move.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Move a Treadmill: Frequently Asked Questions</h2>
<h3>Q: How do I move a treadmill upstairs?</h3>
<p>A: When planning how to move a treadmill upstairs, remember not to do it alone. You&#8217;ll need help from at least one friend or mover. The preparation steps are the same. You may want to use a dolly to wheel the treadmill to the beginning of the stairs.</p>
<p>During the move, one person should be holding the belt, and the other should be at the opposite end of the treadmill. Grip the belt area carefully to avoid slips. Position the machine sideways. The person holding the belt should walk first. Make sure to move extremely carefully, and try not to hit surrounding objects.</p>
<p>One person should always maintain a secure grip on the treadmill when moving up and down the stairs. At the same time, the other mover should be responsible for angling it the right way when passing corners.</p>
<h3>Q: How do I move a NordicTrack treadmill?</h3>
<p>A: Figuring out how to move a NordicTrack treadmill starts with reading the user&#8217;s manual. NordicTrack usually gives clear instructions on how to fold or adjust their treadmills for safe moving.</p>
<p>You can take advantage of the above checklist to move all types of treadmills, from NordicTrack to ProForm and beyond.</p>
<h3>Q: What is the best way to move a heavy elliptical machine?</h3>
<p>A: Moving an elliptical machine is similar to moving a treadmill. You need to follow the instructions for folding, adjusting, or disassembling the equipment. Then you need to lift it onto a dolly, secure with straps, and proceed to the destination.</p>
<h3>Q: Can I move a treadmill on my own?</h3>
<p>A: If a treadmill weighs less than 45 pounds, then you may be able to move it on your own. However, when planning how to move a treadmill, always consider assistance. Even if it&#8217;s easy to lift the treadmill up, it may be hard to carry without someone controlling the process.</p>
<h3>Q: How do I store a treadmill?</h3>
<p>A: If you don’t have room in your new or temporary home for your treadmill, then consider keeping it in <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ideal-storage-unit-features/">a storage unit or other storage place</a>. Leave the treadmill unassembled, and remove the batteries from the console. Also, bag up any loose parts and tape the bag to the frame. These extra precautions ensure you won&#8217;t damage or lose track of the components. Treadmills are safe to store in dry, climate-controlled spaces.</p>
<h2>The Takeaway</h2>
<p>Moving a treadmill to a new home can be tough, especially you’re moving all of your belongings at once. To do everything properly, you need to invest in moving supplies and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-essential-moving-tips-packing-tips/">make proper preparations</a>. If you aren&#8217;t sure you understand how to move a treadmill on your own, then consider asking a professional moving company for assistance.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-treadmill-comprehensive-guide/">How to Move a Treadmill: A Comprehensive Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Move a Washer and Dryer</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-washer-and-dryer/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-washer-and-dryer/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 24 Nov 2020 19:00:27 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[appliances]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6729</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Are you moving to a new place and taking your washer and dryer with you? If you want to manage a DIY move, be prepared because it is not a particularly easy task. Many washers and dryers can weigh over 200 pounds, so heavy lifting will be involved. To protect yourself and others, you need [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-washer-and-dryer/">How to Move a Washer and Dryer</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Are you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-and-packing-tips-the-ultimate-guide-to-relocating-your-home/">moving to a new place</a> and taking your washer and dryer with you? If you want to manage a DIY move, be prepared because it is not a particularly easy task. Many washers and dryers can weigh over 200 pounds, so heavy lifting will be involved. To protect yourself and others, you need to be able to know how to move a washer and dryer safely. So call up your friends, and tell them you need some extra help. Follow this guide on how to move a washer and dryer.</p>
<h2>How to Move a Washer and Dryer: How to Prepare Before the Move</h2>
<p>If you decide to move a washer and dryer by yourself, preparation is vital. Moving both front-loading and top-loading appliances can be virtually impossible without the proper equipment, supplies, assistance, and yes, planning.</p>
<p>There are also significant safety risks involved considering the size and weight of the products, especially when moving them up and down stairs. You have to be extremely careful when moving your appliances so you don’t damage them or hurt yourself. Give yourself at least a week to prepare for the move. Here is how you can set yourself up for success:</p>
<h3>1. Ask Friends or Family for Help</h3>
<p>You should by no means be doing everything by yourself. Even if you don&#8217;t want to hire professional movers, assembling a team of helpers will make this move more efficient and safe. Regardless of whether you’re asking a family member, friend, or neighbor, always ensure they are physically fit enough to help move heavy objects because you do not want to risk a severe injury.</p>
<p>Let them know what day you’re moving, and ask if they’re available during the morning or afternoon. Also, remind them to wear appropriate clothing for the move, such as closed-toed shoes. Flip flops and Crocs a bad idea! Likewise, avoid baggy clothes to avoid getting caught on objects.</p>
<h3>2. Clean the Washer and Dryer</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6731" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Cleaning-out-a-dryer-trap-before-moving-the-appliance.jpg" alt="Cleaning out a dryer trap before moving the appliance" width="1241" height="845" /></p>
<p>You do not want a dirty washer and dryer in your new place, which is why we strongly recommend cleaning them out before your move. Giving your appliances proper cleaning improves both their safety and efficiency.</p>
<p>To clean your washer, all you need are tablets with a specific formula designed for sanitizing a washing machine. These reach the crevices in the drum and drain line. As for your dryer, simply empty your lint trap, remove any lingering lint, and clean the surface with a vacuum or cloth.</p>
<h3>3. Disconnect Your Washer and Dryer</h3>
<p>Follow these steps for disconnecting your machines:</p>
<ol>
<li>Disconnect the electricity. If your appliances are wired directly into the house, go to the fuse box and shift your laundry room breakers off. Otherwise, simply unplug the electrical cords.</li>
<li>Turn off the local water supply to the washing machine. There should be a water valve next to the machine. If not, you may need to shut off the water valve to the entire house.</li>
<li>Disconnect the washer&#8217;s water hoses. You will likely need a wrench to disconnect the water hoses from the wall. Once complete, place the hoses in a plastic bag so they do not get lost.</li>
<li>If you have a gas dryer, disconnect the dyer&#8217;s gas line. Before you disconnect the gas line, make sure to shut off the gas valve to not cause an accident. You may also need a wrench for this task.</li>
<li>Remove and store the dryer vents. Like the water hoses, place the vents in a plastic bag for safekeeping.</li>
</ol>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Before you start disconnecting the machines, consult your owner&#8217;s manuals. Your individual models may have unique requirements or safety considerations.</p></blockquote>
<h3>4. Gather the Right Moving Supplies</h3>
<p>Having the right equipment is essential when planning how to move a washer and dryer. The necessary equipment for the move includes:</p>
<ul>
<li>Gloves</li>
<li>Moving straps</li>
<li>An appliance dolly or hand truck</li>
<li>A vacuum cleaner</li>
<li>A wrench</li>
<li>Moving blankets</li>
<li>Forearm forklifts</li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/">Packing tape</a></li>
<li>Shipping bolts or washer locks</li>
</ul>
<p>Always bring extra supplies just in case a moving strap breaks or you lose a tool during the moving process.</p>
<h2>How to Move a Washer and Dryer: Moving Day</h2>
<p>Now that your machines are disconnected and dry, they should be ready for the actual move. Follow these steps:</p>
<h3>1. Protect Your Washer and Dryer</h3>
<p>Secure the tub of your washer in place with the shipping bolts. These pieces of hardware slot into place along the bottom of the drum so it doesn’t move or vibrate during transportation.</p>
<p>To protect the exterior of your washer and dryer from scratches, dents, and nicks, you should wrap them in moving blankets or cardboard. Secure the blankets with moving tape. While shrink wrap is a valuable option to help fasten the covers, avoid using plastic tarps or sheeting. Those fabrics trap humidity, which can breed mildew from leftover rainwater.</p>
<h3>2. Have a Plan for Moving Up and Down Stairs</h3>
<p>If you have to move a washer and dryer up or down stairs, forearm forklifts are an incredibly helpful tool. You can also secure the washer and dryer with bungee cords and ropes to an appliance dolly. Appliance dollies generally come equipped with built-in cords for added safety.</p>
<p>If going down a straight stairwell, an appliance dolly has useful tracks that enable you to lower or drag the appliance across multiple steps at once. Being able to glide across the surface prevents the typical jolting experienced whenever you hit a stair as you make your way down.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Washer and Dryer:</h4>
<p>Every time you move heavy equipment up or down stairs, <a href="https://dolly.com/blog/5-tips-staying-healthy-safe-sane-moving/" target="_blank">always stretch beforehand</a>. Likewise, take your time. There is no need to rush. When you rush, you risk injury. Moving heavy equipment like a washer and dryer is strenuous, so we should remind you again to definitely not be doing this alone.</p></blockquote>
<h3>3. Load the Machines Onto a Moving Truck</h3>
<p>Now that you got your washer and dryer out of your old house, it is time to get them on your moving vehicle. Placement of your washer and dryer is vital, especially if you are moving a bunch of other items. You should factor in the distance and intricacy of the move. For instance, are you taking the highway or traveling through hills? Likewise, are you driving around the block, across the state, or cross-country?</p>
<p>Generally, the safest place to load your washer and dryer is closer to the cab of the vehicle. Being closer to the cab evens out the weight distribution, which helps stabilize the vehicle and reduces shifting.</p>
<p>If you use a pickup truck instead of a moving van, keep an eye on your appliances during transportation. We recommend investing in some ratchet tie-down straps to help secure your washer and dryer. They will keep your items in place and are more secure than traditional ropes or cords.</p>
<h3>4. Move Them Into Your New Home or Apartment</h3>
<p>Once you get to your new place, do not immediately rush to install your washer and dryer. Create <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">a plan for your total unpacking process</a>. First, you need to hook up the gas, water, and electricity. Make sure to set your appliances a few feet away from their new location, leaving yourself enough space to access the back wall. Likewise, if you have to move your washer and dryer up or down steps again, make sure you approach it the same way you did at your old house: safely and slowly. If you’re tired from the initial move, wait until you are fully rested before tackling the final installation. When fatigued, you run a far greater risk of injury.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Washer and Dryer:</h4>
<p>Make sure you identify the cold water supply and hot water supply before installing your machine.</p></blockquote>
<h3>5. Consider Storing Your Washer and Dryer</h3>
<p>If you’re between places, consider storing your washer and dryer <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/storage-facilities-guide/">in a storage unit</a>. Storage units are generally inexpensive and great locations to keep important items. If you’re using a storage unit, you want to cover your appliances with moving blankets. Make sure they have some airflow, and keep them covered until you officially move into your new place. If you do not store them correctly, you run the risk of your appliances becoming damaged from mold or mildew buildup.</p>
<p>Now that we went over the basics for how to move a washer and dryer, you should be adequately prepared to tackle other heavy challenges, such as moving a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">piano</a> or a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">refrigerator</a>. But remember: never move them by yourself! Always ask for help. Chances are that if you are moving to a new house, you are moving other large appliances, too. If that is the case, feel free to check out some of our other helpful guides.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-washer-and-dryer/">How to Move a Washer and Dryer</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>First Apartment Checklist: Top 11 Apartment Essentials</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/first-apartment-checklist-top-11-apartment-essentials/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/first-apartment-checklist-top-11-apartment-essentials/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Nov 2020 19:00:44 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[apartment]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[home advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Home Organization]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving checklist]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Renter]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6723</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Leasing your first apartment and moving out is a milestone in your life. Now that you have signed the lease, the fun begins. When the time has come for you to start unpacking and organizing your first apartment, follow this first apartment checklist to ensure you are well-suited for apartment living. You can even partner [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/first-apartment-checklist-top-11-apartment-essentials/">First Apartment Checklist: Top 11 Apartment Essentials</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Leasing your first apartment and moving out is a milestone in your life. Now that you have signed the lease, the fun begins. When the time has come for you to start unpacking and organizing your first apartment, follow this first apartment checklist to ensure you are well-suited for apartment living. You can even <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/25-essential-roommate-rules/">partner with your new roommates</a> to make sure these renters essentials are covered:</p>
<h2>1. Tool Kit</h2>
<p>Now that you are venturing out on your own, have a tool kit ready to tackle any small projects. Trying to handle some DIY projects and maintenance can also help you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/save-money-fast/">save money</a>. In your toolkit, you need to have the following items:</p>
<ul>
<li>Hammer</li>
<li>Screwdrivers (Flathead and Phillips)</li>
<li>Nails</li>
<li>Screws</li>
<li>Wall hooks</li>
</ul>
<p>Trying to piece together furniture and hang your pictures can be difficult without the right tools. Having this tool kit handy can teach you a new set of skills and prevent you from having to pay others for these tasks. These items are an essential part of the first apartment checklist because they will come in handy for the remaining essentials.</p>
<h2>2. Step Stool</h2>
<p>One of the things on your first apartment checklist that is often overlooked is a step stool. You may not think you a step stool is essential until you already need it. Maybe you can&#8217;t reach the top shelves and cabinets in your kitchen. Some apartments also come with higher ceilings and high shelving, making it difficult to access this area without assistance. So have a step stool ready for any unexpected inconveniences. A step stool is easy to pull out and use, then store away at a later time. It will help you safely hang your pictures and store items on shelves for safe-keeping.</p>
<h2>3. Cleaning Supplies</h2>
<p>Having a good stock of cleaning essentials is one of the most important things in your first apartment checklist. Now that you will be responsible for cleaning your own place, you need the appropriate cleaning supplies to keep these areas fresh, clean, and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-mold-ultimate-guide/">free of mold</a>. The list of essentials includes:</p>
<ul>
<li>All-purpose cleaner</li>
<li>Mop/Broom/Vacuum for complete floor care</li>
<li>Extendable duster</li>
<li>Toilet brush</li>
<li>Dish soap and sponges</li>
<li>Laundry detergent</li>
<li>Paper towels</li>
<li>Dishtowels</li>
<li>Dustpan</li>
<li>​Plunger</li>
<li>Standard disinfectant</li>
<li>Toilet brush</li>
<li>Trash can and trash bags</li>
<li>Vacuum cleaner</li>
</ul>
<p>Everything from your clothes and furniture to your counters and floors needs to be cleaned regularly in your apartment. Having the right equipment available to clean these areas in your apartment while moving in (and regularly afterward) is essential. As you unpack and begin to set up your apartment, you will find all of these items to come in handy right away.</p>
<h2>4. A First-Aid Kit</h2>
<p>You never know when you are going to need to bandage a minor cut or injury at home. It can be challenging to treat a small cut or burn without a first aid kit. You’re also more likely to accidentally injure yourself as you’re unpacking and assembling furniture, so it’s an essential item on your first apartment checklist. In your first aid kit, you should have the following items:</p>
<ul>
<li>Bandages</li>
<li>Topical ointment</li>
<li>Alcohol wipes</li>
<li>Medical tape</li>
<li>Cold/Allergy medication</li>
<li>Cough drops</li>
<li>Gauze</li>
</ul>
<p>Unfortunately, minor accidents are bound to happen while living in your apartment, just as they did at your childhood home. Make sure to have a variety of sizes in bandages. Also, buy the ointment and alcohol needed to clean them. When you have everything ready, it’s much easier to treat injuries and get on with your day.</p>
<h2>5. Extra Bedding and Blankets</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6725" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Woman-organizing-extra-blankets-in-her-apartments-linen-closet.jpg" alt="Woman organizing extra blankets in her apartment's linen closet" width="1272" height="825" /></p>
<p>While you may be bringing over your current bed, duvet, and pillows, it is good to have extra linens for your bedding as a part of your first apartment checklist. A new apartment is a good reason to purchase new sheets and that bedding set that you have been eyeballing at your favorite store. Having that extra bedding for a quick bedding change will come in handy if you’re ever sick or run into delays with laundry — you&#8217;re always prepared with fresh sheets. It’s also useful to have additional blankets and pillows set aside in case of a guest.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Also purchase a pair of extra bath towels, hand towels, and washcloths for when you have guests or your towels are in the laundry.</p></blockquote>
<h2>6. Kitchen Appliances and Essentials</h2>
<p>Kitchen appliances are an expensive part of your first apartment checklist, but your new home may have nothing but an oven and a refrigerator. Even if you have a small kitchen in your new apartment without a lot of countertop space, it is a good idea to have a few appliances around to do the cooking and prepare these meals easier. Things like a toaster oven, small coffeemaker, and microwave are essential. Even when you do not feel like cooking, you can toast a piece of bread or throw a microwave dinner in after a long day.</p>
<p>Some other kitchen essentials you should look for are:</p>
<ul>
<li>Aluminum foil</li>
<li>Bottle opener</li>
<li>Can opener</li>
<li>Colander</li>
<li>Cookie sheet</li>
<li>Cooking utensils</li>
<li>Cutting board</li>
<li>​Dish drying rack</li>
<li>​Dishes</li>
<li>Oven mitts</li>
<li>Paper towel holder</li>
<li>Plastic wrap</li>
<li>Silverware</li>
<li>Tupperware</li>
</ul>
<h2>7. Lighting And Lamps</h2>
<p>You do not want your first apartment to feel like a dungeon, which is why additional lighting is on the first apartment checklist. Many apartments have minimal lighting in each room. But a few extra lamps around the living area and bedroom can <a href="https://www.sciencealert.com/does-colour-really-affect-our-brain-and-body-a-professor-of-colour-science-explains" target="_blank">transform your apartment&#8217;s entire atmosphere</a>. Proper lighting allows you to have that sense of home and familiarity, which is good for your emotional health when you strike out on your own. Make sure to get extra light bulbs and an extension cord while you&#8217;re at the store!</p>
<h2>8. Storage Options</h2>
<p>When you pick up new items on your first apartment checklist, grabbing a few storage containers, bookshelves, and clothes hangers to tuck some of your stuff away is essential.</p>
<p>Not all apartments come with enough storage for extra linens, dishes, or books that you may need when you move into your first apartment. A sturdy laundry basket can also help you keep your room and laundry organized.</p>
<h2>9. Curtains</h2>
<p>You will need to purchase curtains right away for your windows as a part of your first apartment checklist, both for privacy and for lighting control. Even if you&#8217;re on an upper floor, people may be able to see inside your home.</p>
<p>If you have different colors in each room or plan to decorate your apartment in a theme, then you can get curtains in colors and patterns to fit your personal preference. Curtains can be light or heavy, depending on where you are moving and how much sun comes into your apartment. People in cooler climates often embrace the sun and opt for lighter curtains. These will brighten up their apartment and invite the light in. For warmer climates, darkening curtains are a great option. They can keep the sun out of the apartment and keep the apartment cool.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Take a count of how many windows you have and their sizes before you purchase your curtains.</p></blockquote>
<h2>10. Essential Furniture</h2>
<p>When you are making a list of the furniture you need, these items should certainly be on your first apartment checklist:</p>
<ul>
<li>Couch/Sofa</li>
<li>Chair</li>
<li>A small table or coffee table</li>
<li>Bed frame and mattress</li>
<li>End tables</li>
<li>TV stand/Entertainment center</li>
</ul>
<p>Having a comfortable couch and chair for your living room is essential for you and any guests you may have. Also, make sure to have a small kitchen table for the corner of your kitchen, or choose bar stools if your apartment has a bar. You want to have enough furniture to enjoy your meals without cluttering up the area.</p>
<p>End tables and TV stands are great sources for additional storage. Choose options that match your couch and chair. Also look for options that provide creative ways to store the things you need in the living area. You do not want to go on an adventure for the TV remote or your laptop charger.</p>
<p>Depending on your budget, you might be planning to purchase a new bed and mattress for your apartment. If so, then make sure you get all the box spring components to go with the mattress and the frame. You might put the mattress on the floor the first night. But you do not want to make that a habit for the long-term. If you are keeping your current bed, then <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">this mattress moving guide</a> will help keep it in good, clean condition.</p>
<h2>11. Bathroom Essentials</h2>
<p>While you won&#8217;t need a lot of furniture or appliances for your bathroom, you&#8217;ll need to purchase a lot of small toiletries and supplies. Some key items to get on your first shopping trip include:</p>
<ul>
<li>A shower curtain</li>
<li>Bath mat</li>
<li>Toothbrush holder</li>
<li>Toilet paper</li>
<li>Hand soap</li>
</ul>
<p>While there is much more to purchase for your apartment, this first apartment checklist is the foundation of what you need when you&#8217;re moving out for the first time. Now you can start <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/bedroom-organization/">organizing your dream bedroom</a> and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-organization-guide/">making your new home your own</a>. Be prepared for the next chapter in your life as you check off each of these items on your next shopping trip.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources:</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/first-apartment-checklist-top-11-apartment-essentials/">First Apartment Checklist: Top 11 Apartment Essentials</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Survey: Over 20% More Americans Plan to Move in 2021 Than in 2020</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/more-americans-plan-to-move-in-2021/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/more-americans-plan-to-move-in-2021/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 19 Nov 2020 12:00:07 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6804</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>The Neighbor 2020 - 2021 American Migration Report breaks down at what rate Americans are moving, where they’re going, and their main motivations for moving.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/more-americans-plan-to-move-in-2021/">Survey: Over 20% More Americans Plan to Move in 2021 Than in 2020</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>Many aspects of American life have been greatly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting rearranging of society that has come to define 2020.</p>
<p>A survey conducted by the Pew Research Center while the pandemic was in full swing in June 2020 found that <a href="https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2020/07/06/about-a-fifth-of-u-s-adults-moved-due-to-covid-19-or-know-someone-who-did/" target="_blank">approximately a fifth of Americans moved or know someone who moved as a result of COVID-19</a>. The reasons they gave for people moving were extremely varied — ranging from being called into active military duty to college housing being closed down to, of course, sudden financial constraints.</p>
<p><span id="more-6804"></span></p>
<p>But what Pew <em><i>didn’t</i></em> uncover was that 2021 is actually going to be an even <em><i>bigger</i></em> year for relocating in the U.S.</p>
<p>The Neighbor 2020 &#8211; 2021 American Migration Report surveyed over 1,000 U.S.-based respondents to find out just how many Americans were planning to move in 2021 as well as their key motivations for doing so. Here’s a quick summary of what we learned:</p>
<ul>
<li>Over <strong><b>20% more people are planning to move in 2021 </b></strong>than moved in 2020.</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li>The <strong><b>majority of these movers aren’t relocating due to safety concerns related to COVID-19 </b></strong>like we would have expected.</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li>While <strong><b>18% of respondents who plan to move in 2021 are </b></strong><strong><em><b><i>able </i></b></em></strong><strong><b>to do so as a result of job flexibility</b></strong> brought on by the 2019 coronavirus, most are ultimately doing so to<strong><b> lower their cost of living</b></strong>.</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li>With <strong><b>more living space being a key deciding factor </b></strong>in where people plan to move and about <strong>40% of movers relocating from larger cities to smaller communities</strong>, our finding that <strong><b>homeownership is on the rise</b></strong> makes sense.</li>
</ul>
<ul>
<li>On an uplifting note, once it’s considered safe to do so, <strong><b>over 70% of respondents say they’re excited to meet or get to know their new neighbors</b></strong> Many also report interest in <strong><b>getting more involved in local events and volunteer opportunities in their new neighborhoods</b></strong>.</li>
</ul>
<p>Keep reading for a deep dive into the number of Americans that are moving in 2021, their main motivations for doing so, where they’re going, and more.</p>
<p><strong><b>Table of Contents: </b></strong></p>
<p><a href="#more">Moving Is Up Dramatically and Even More Americans Will Move in 2021 Than 2020</a></p>
<p><a href="#why">Why Are So Many People Planning to Move in 2021?</a></p>
<p><a href="#home">Home Ownership Up 11% Among Movers in 2020 and 2021</a></p>
<p><a href="#small">Four in Ten Movers From Big Cities Are Relocating to Somewhere Smaller</a></p>
<p><a href="#space">Movers Prioritize More Space, Inside and Out</a></p>
<p><a href="#community">The Bright Side: People Are Excited to Interact With Their New Communities</a></p>
<p><a href="#survey">Our Survey Methodology</a></p>
<h2>Moving Is Up Dramatically and Even More Americans Will Move in 2021 Than 2020</h2>
<p>Our key finding from The Neighbor 2020 &#8211; 2021 American Migration Report is that 21% more people plan to move in 2021 than moved in 2020 (56% as compared to 35%).</p>
<p>In addition, the number of people who moved in 2020 who plan to move yet <em><i>again</i></em> in 2021 is higher than we would have expected at about 9% of respondents.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6808 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/01-How-Do-You-Feel-About-Moving.png" alt="Moving Is up Dramatically and Even More Americans Will Move in 2021 Than 2020" width="1789" height="1105" /></p>
<p>In a year like 2020 that has been punctuated with exceptional events including the outbreak of COVID-19 and a record-breaking presidential election, we can’t say we’re shocked to see that people are more inclined to disrupt the status quo than usual. However, it’s interesting to see the jump from the <a href="https://www.northamerican.com/migration-map" target="_blank">14% of Americans who move in a <em><i>typical</i></em> year</a>.</p>
<p>So let’s explore exactly why people are moving, which you may be surprised to learn is not <em><i>because</i></em> <em><i>of</i></em> but partially <em><i>enabled</i></em> <em><i>by</i></em> the COVID-19 outbreak.</p>
<div id="why"></div>
<h2>Why Are So Many People Planning to Move in 2021?</h2>
<p>Interestingly, primarily pandemic-driven relocations are higher now in 2020 than they will be in 2021. Over 17% of respondents said they moved during 2020 to improve their safety related to COVID-19. For those moving in 2021, fewer than 13% will do so primarily because of COVID-19 safety concerns.</p>
<p>However, that isn’t to say that many moves weren’t <em><i>enabled</i></em> by changes brought about by the virus.</p>
<p>Over 18% of respondents in our survey reported that they were able to move specifically because of increased flexibility at work, presumptively due to COVID-19 and the wave of remote work arrangements it unleashed upon the world.</p>
<p>Ultimately, for people who plan to move in 2021, the majority said they will do so in order to lower their cost of living (47%). The next most popular reason to move was to be closer to family (30%).</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6809 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/02-Why-Are-You-Moving.png" alt="Why Are So Many People Planning to Move in 2021" width="1789" height="1730" /></p>
<div id="home"></div>
<h2>Home Ownership Up 11% Among Movers in 2020 and 2021</h2>
<p>As moves are on the rise in both 2020 and 2021, so is new and future homeownership among the movers we surveyed.</p>
<p>In our survey, we asked about movers’ living situations before and after their move. About 43% said they owned their previous home (or current home, if they’re planning to move). But, more than 54% said they now own their new home (or will own their home after moving).</p>
<p>This represents a full 11-point uptick in homeownership among our survey respondents.</p>
<p>About 49% of respondents said they were previously renting (or currently renting, if they’re planning to move in the future), compared with just 40% who said that they are now renting (or will be renting after moving). That’s a drop of 9%.</p>
<p>The remaining respondents — about 8% — said they had a living arrangement with friends or family where they were not paying. That number dropped to 6% when asked about their current or future living arrangements after moving. (This accounts for the 2% discrepancy between the rise in homeownership versus the decline in renting.)</p>
<p>This aligns as expected with both the percentage of Americans who are moving away from larger cities as well as the biggest factors that are influencing the homes they decided to move into — the details of which we’ll explore over the next few sections.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6810 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/03-Ownership-on-the-Rise.png" alt="Home Ownership Up 11% Among Movers in 2020 and 2021" width="1789" height="1292" /></p>
<div id="small"></div>
<h2>Four in Ten Movers From Big Cities Are Relocating to Somewhere Smaller</h2>
<p>Ever since the reality set in that the impact of the pandemic would last <em><i>months</i></em> instead of weeks, the assumption became that America’s largest cities would see some level of out-migration.</p>
<p>Our survey proved that assumption, finding that about 40% of movers living in “Large Cities” say they&#8217;ve moved or will be moving to another type of community — suburban, small town, or rural.</p>
<p>Nearly 20% of respondents were moving because of newly-instilled remote arrangements at their workplaces.</p>
<p>Moving away from larger cities often also fulfills what Americans said was their biggest reason for moving: A lower cost of living (see “Why Are You Moving in 2021?” chart above). This lower overall cost of living helps to achieve what our respondents said was the leading priority when it came to choosing a new home — space.</p>
<div id="space"></div>
<h2>Movers Prioritize More Space, Inside and Out</h2>
<p>Half of respondents who plan to move in 2021 said their new place will have more space. In comparison, 28% said they’d be moving somewhere with less space and 22% said their home would remain the same size.</p>
<p>More space — from outside to the kitchen to the garage — was the most important factor for respondents when choosing a new home.</p>
<p>Why do Americans want more space? Aside from <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/americans-outgrow-living-space/">needing more areas for storage</a>, they also expressed interest in increasing the space they had to work from home, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/remote-learning-isnt-working/">educate their children from home</a>, and exercise from home — all activities that the 2019 coronavirus has made much safer to do in the comfort of our own homes.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6811 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/04-Which-of-These-Factors-Affect-The-Home-You-Choose.png" alt="Movers Prioritize More Space, Inside and Out" width="1789" height="1973" /></p>
<div id="communities"></div>
<h2>The Bright Side: People Are Excited to Interact With Their New Communities</h2>
<p>As soon as COVID-19 is contained, 46% of respondents said they planned to get even more involved in local events than they were in their old communities. Nearly 40% reported that they were looking forward to participating in more local volunteer opportunities than they had in their previous neighborhoods.</p>
<p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-6813 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/05-How-Is-Your-Relationship-with-Your-Neighbors.png" alt="The Bright Side: People Are Excited to Interact With Their New Communities" width="1789" height="1328" /></p>
<p>But for our most heartwarming finding of all, 72% of Americans said they were looking forward to meeting and getting to know their neighbors better once it was safe to do so.</p>
<p>In a year that gave us more reasons than ever to hide away from our neighbors, it’s uplifting to see that hope and resilience are still alive in American and that so many people are excited to get back out and do great things in their communities as soon as they have the chance.</p>
<div id="survey"></div>
<h2>Our Survey Methodology</h2>
<p>The Neighbor 2020 &#8211; 2021 American Migration Report surveyed 1,006 U.S.-based adults in November 2020 via Pollfish.com.</p>
<p>Respondents were about 59% female and 41% male. In addition, 7% were aged 18-24, 36% were aged 25-34, 35% were aged 35-44, 13% were aged 45-54, and 9% were over the age of 54.</p>
<p>Please note that survey results were stratified, totals may not add to 100% due to rounding, and some questions allowed respondents to choose multiple answers. We decided to disqualify answers from respondents who moved for college, because many of their housing choices are outside of their control.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/more-americans-plan-to-move-in-2021/">Survey: Over 20% More Americans Plan to Move in 2021 Than in 2020</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Move With a Cat to a New Home</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-with-a-cat/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-with-a-cat/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 17 Nov 2020 19:00:19 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[pet guide]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6678</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Moving is a stressful process for many people. You have to pack up your home, take care of transferring all your services, and change your address. You also need to make sure that each member of your family, including the furry ones, is ready for the big change in their lives. Having a plan for [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-with-a-cat/">How to Move With a Cat to a New Home</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Moving is a stressful process for many people. You have to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/">pack up your home</a>, take care of transferring all your services, and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">change your address</a>. You also need to make sure that each member of your family, including the furry ones, is ready for the big change in their lives. Having a plan for how to move with a cat will make the process easier. Take a look at these critical tips for a cat-friendly moving process.</p>
<h2>1. Prepare Your Cat for the Move Well Ahead of Time</h2>
<p>For some cat owners, pets are their top priority as they plan a big move. Others, however, may struggle to juggle the needs of their furry family members. Make sure that you&#8217;re preparing your cat as well as possible before the move begins. You should:</p>
<h3>Keep your cat on its normal schedule as much as possible.</h3>
<p>Many cats do not like change. They prefer a set routine they can rely on. During a move, your routine often gets thrown out the window. Your cat may feel as though it&#8217;s living in the midst of chaos.</p>
<p>Try to stick to your cat&#8217;s schedule as much as you can. Continue to feed it at the same mealtimes, offer regular playtime, and be available for snuggles at your usual time. These simple steps can decrease your cat&#8217;s anxiety and make it easier for your cat to manage the move.</p>
<h3>Visit your vet, if needed.</h3>
<p>Are you sure your cat is up-to-date on important vaccinations? Make sure that you visit the vet before your big move. If you&#8217;re moving long-distance, especially overseas, you will want to be sure that your pet has all the vaccinations they need to make that move. This is also a good time to microchip your cat. You might even be able to ask your vet for recommendations for a new vet when you reach your new home.</p>
<p>Do you have a particularly anxious cat? Your vet may be able to give you medications or tips to help your furry friend cope with anxiety around the move, especially if you know that he often gets upset at change. If you&#8217;re considering anti-anxiety medication to keep your cat calm, test it out before the big day.</p>
<h3>Buy a comfortable cat carrier and help your cat acclimate to it.</h3>
<p>Consider how you&#8217;ll be transporting your cat and how long your cat will need to be in the crate as you plan out how to move with a cat. For example, are you just moving across town? If so, your cat may only need to be in the crate for one brief car ride. On the other hand, you might be traveling cross-country or internationally. Then, you&#8217;ll need to make sure that you meet <a href="https://www.pettravel.com/passports_container_requirements.cfm" target="_blank">airline recommendations</a> for traveling with your pet. A long-distance move will also mean making sure that your cat has access to food, a water bowl, and litter box accommodations. You should also make sure their collar tag has your phone number, not your old home&#8217;s address.</p>
<p>Buy the crate well before the move and give your cat a chance to explore it. You may want to put in a few toys or a towel that smells like home and family to your cat.</p>
<h3>Make plans for your cat.</h3>
<p>In some moves, planning for how to move with your cat is as simple as loading him into the car along with the rest of the family. In other cases, you may need to make more complicated arrangements. These include planning for a plane trip or making sure that you can keep your cat in the hotel with you along the way. Make sure you know how your cat will get to his destination. Plan for him to travel in a crate or carrying case. The stress from the move can cause even the most mild-mannered pet to try to escape at the worst possible moments.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move With a Cat:</h4>
<p>Consider boarding your cat during a local move. Nervous cats may do better with boarding for a few days at the vet or a pet daycare. This can help reduce stress and anxiety while you&#8217;re packing (and while movers are in and out). This also means they won&#8217;t have to spend any time in a hot car.</p></blockquote>
<h2>2. Know What You&#8217;re Doing on Moving Day</h2>
<p>When moving day arrives, you want to be sure that your cat is safe and ready for the move. Moving house with a cat means that you must take your cat&#8217;s needs into consideration throughout the day. Make sure you have a clear plan for how to move with your cat just like you do for your human family members! Follow these tips:</p>
<h3>Give your cat a light meal.</h3>
<p>You may need to wake early to make it possible for your cat to eat before the move. Keep in mind that some pets will not eat while in their crate, but bring a portion of the cat&#8217;s food in a small bag, just in case.</p>
<h3>Make sure your cat has access to fresh water.</h3>
<p>You can either place water in the crate with your cat or, if your cat is prone to knocking over bowls or making a mess, try offering your cat water periodically throughout the day — when you take a rest break, for example.</p>
<h3>Place your cat in his crate early in the day.</h3>
<p>Cats are prone to running out the door or getting underfoot at the worst possible moment. On moving day, many people will be in and out of the house, with the door opening and closing constantly. Place your cat in his crate early in the day to help stop him from escaping.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move With a Cat:</h4>
<p>Keep your cat in his crate. As a pet owner, it can be hard to see your cat distressed, especially if he does not like the crate or is an outdoor cat. However, keeping him in his crate prevents him from getting lost during your move.</p></blockquote>
<h2>3. Give Your Cat Time to Adjust to His New Home</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6680" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Neighbor-How-to-Move-With-a-Cat-Cat-in-a-Small-Part-of-a-New-House.jpg" alt="cat in a quiet corner of a new house as it acclimates" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Planning how to move with a cat includes making time for adjustment. When you arrive at your new home, start by keeping the cat in his crate or keeping him shut in a single new room while you unload the moving truck. Put your cat&#8217;s favorite toys in the room so he doesn&#8217;t get bored. Just like when you were loading the boxes in the first place, you will want to be sure that your cat can&#8217;t escape.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move With a Cat:</h4>
<p>If you leave your cat in a closed room during the unpacking process, clearly label the door so it doesn&#8217;t get opened by mistake. You don&#8217;t want your cat to go running off in an unfamiliar new neighborhood!</p></blockquote>
<h3>How long does it take a cat to get used to his or her new home?</h3>
<p>It takes an average of two weeks for a cat to settle into a new environment and for your cat&#8217;s stress levels to return to normal lows. As you plan out how to move with a cat, make sure you&#8217;re prepared for that long stretch of time. Make sure your cat&#8217;s mealtimes and routine are as consistent and low-stress as possible.</p>
<h3>How do cats adjust to a new environment?</h3>
<p>Cats need to explore their new environment, but don’t let them get overwhelmed. Part of a cat-friendly move is helping your cat adjust to the new space in increments. Knowing how to move with a cat includes knowing your cat&#8217;s personality. Some cats want to explore their big, new space as soon as possible. Others may adapt better if they have more time to get to know their new surroundings. Consider placing your cat in a single, quiet room for a few days, not just move-in day. Then you can open the door and let him explore his new space.</p>
<p>You may also want to make sure you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-spring-cleaning-decluttering-deep-cleaning-guide/">thoroughly clean your new house</a> before you let your cat out to wander around. This is especially important if the former owners had pets or you notice anything that could pose a danger to your cat.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move With a Cat:</h4>
<p>Use the same litter box from your old home. Place your cat&#8217;s litter tray in its permanent home and introduce your cat to it as soon as possible. Try not to pile moving boxes around or on the litter box, even temporarily. This could lead to scent marking and cause your pet to use the bathroom on your possessions.</p></blockquote>
<p>Planning how to move with a cat can cause a great deal of stress. With these tips, however, you can create a safer, happier move for your cat and your entire family. If you have another pet, such as a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-fish-tank-pet-fish/">fish </a>or a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">dog</a>, make sure you create a separate pet-friendly plan to help them acclimate to their new home, too.</p>
<p>Additional Moving Resources:</p>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
      </a>
   </div>
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-with-a-cat/">How to Move With a Cat to a New Home</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
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		<title>How to Move a Fish Tank and Your Pet Fish</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-fish-tank-pet-fish/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-fish-tank-pet-fish/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 12 Nov 2020 19:00:13 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[fish tank]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[pet guide]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6669</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Packing all your belongings into boxes and moving to a new home is a major job, especially if you’re moving with a pet. Even moving with a pet fish can be challenging. Your aquarium is fragile, heavy, and requires special treatment, so moving it is a project on its own. When learning how to move [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-fish-tank-pet-fish/">How to Move a Fish Tank and Your Pet Fish</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Packing all your belongings into boxes and moving to a new home is a major job, especially if <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">you’re moving with a pet</a>. Even moving with a pet fish can be challenging. Your aquarium is fragile, heavy, and requires special treatment, so moving it is a project on its own. When learning how to move a fish tank, you must consider how to move both your fish and their delicate home safely.</p>
<h2>Packing Supplies Needed to Safely Move Your Fish Tank</h2>
<p>Having the right supplies on hand will help you prepare for each step of how to move a fish tank. It can also help you avoid damage to your aquarium. As a fish owner, you may already have many of these supplies on hand. Your supply list for moving your fish tank should include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Fish nets</li>
<li>Siphon hose</li>
<li>Clean 5-gallon buckets or tubs with secure lids</li>
<li>Fish bags (or similar plastic bags)</li>
<li>Packing tape</li>
<li>Wire strainer or colander</li>
<li>Water conditioner</li>
<li>Blankets, bubble wrap, and padding</li>
<li>Wet/Dry vac</li>
<li>Leveling shims</li>
<li>Tarps or other floor protection</li>
</ul>
<h2>How To Move a Fish Tank: Your Step-by-Step Guide</h2>
<p>Taking careful steps to prepare your fish and their home properly provides your finned pets with a higher chance of surviving the move and the first days in a new home. Begin preparations to move your fish about 48 hours before you&#8217;re ready to move the fish tank. This will also give you an opportunity to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-fish-tank/">clean your fish tank</a>. When learning how to move a fish tank, following these steps is essential:</p>
<h3>1. Prepare Your Fish for the Move</h3>
<p>The first step in deciding how to move a fish tank should be about moving the fish inside. Stop feeding your fish 24 to 48 hours ahead of the move. This will allow waste to pass through their system and also give the filtration system time to clear out. It&#8217;s <a href="https://aquanswers.com/how-long-can-fish-go-without-food-chart/" target="_blank">perfectly safe for most adult fish</a> to go without food for up to a week. Use water from the tank in the containers used to transport your fish.</p>
<p>Take these steps to safely move your fish before planning how to move a fish tank:</p>
<h4>Choose the Right Transport Container for Your Fish</h4>
<p>For short moves, use fish bags. One fish can be placed in each fish bag. Bags should be doubled for safety, and only about one-third filled with water to provide ample oxygen. Seal the bags shut with tight rubber bands Moves that take over an hour will require buckets, and you can place three or four fish in each five-gallon bucket for transport. Buckets should be only half full and have tight-fitting lids reinforced with duct tape.</p>
<h4>Remove Your Fish From the Tank</h4>
<p>Scoop water from the fish tank to fill the travel containers to the desired level. Use a fish net to safely catch your fish one at a time and place them in their travel container.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Fish are easier to catch when all decorations have been removed from the tank. After removing decorations, allow sand and debris to settle before siphoning water for the fish to travel in.</p></blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<h4>Prepare the Fish to Travel Safely</h4>
<p>If you’re using fish bags, place the bags in a cooler. Also, surround the bags with bubble wrap for added protection. For buckets, make sure the buckets are tightly sealed and are on a flat surface during travel. Avoid spaces that allow containers to be exposed to direct sunlight during transport. This will help keep the water at safe room temperature levels.</p>
<p>If you are traveling for more than 6 hours, then you&#8217;ll need to take additional precautions. Longer moves are very stressful for fish. Talk to your local pet store owner about how to safely move fish long distances. Pet shops can help you make arrangements for air shipment. You may even decide to rehome your fish with local friends or family members who already have an aquarium. Either of these options will allow you to travel with the fish tank only and get new fish closer to your new home.</p>
<h3>2. Empty the Tank</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6672" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Emptying-a-Fish-Tank-Neighbor-How-to-Move-a-Fish-Tank.jpg" alt="a half-full fish tank being emptied for a big move" width="1256" height="835" /></p>
<h4>Can you move a fish tank with water in it?</h4>
<p>No; you should never leave water in your fish tank while moving it, even just a short distance. When deciding how to move a fish tank to another room, people often mistakenly assume you can leave some water in the tank. While your tank is sturdily built, the force applied when you lift the tank can cause damage to the tank&#8217;s seams.</p>
<p>Follow these steps to empty your tank of all the fish tank equipment:</p>
<ol>
<li>Unplug the lights, air pump, and heater.</li>
<li>Allow these items to cool before taking steps to empty the fish tank.</li>
<li>Remove live plants and place them in a five-gallon bucket half-filled with fish tank water.</li>
<li>Remove rocks, decorations, and gravel.</li>
<li>Clean these items with water only.</li>
<li>Dry the items and wrap them in packing paper before transferring to a moving box.</li>
</ol>
<h3>3. Disassemble the Fish Tank</h3>
<p>You will need to remove the filter and other working parts from your tank before transport. Remove the lights, heaters, chillers, tubes, and filtration systems. Wrap and pack these items into the moving box.</p>
<h4>Note: The filter should be packed damp to preserve the good bacteria.</h4>
<h3>4. Siphon the Water, and Clean and Dry the Tank</h3>
<p>It&#8217;s essential to empty the tank of any remaining water and gravel from your tank. Siphon water from the tank into five-gallon buckets, and then remove any remaining gravel or sand. When the fish tank is empty, use a wet/dry vacuum to clean the tank. Completely dry your fish tank before packing it.</p>
<h3>5. Pack Your Fish Tank</h3>
<p>If you have a small or medium tank, then using a moving box is your best bet for a safe trip. Grab a helper to avoid adding stress to the tank&#8217;s seals, and gently place your aquarium into a similarly sized moving box. Add foam sheets to prevent shifting during travel.</p>
<p>Finding a box for larger fish tanks can be difficult. Instead, wrap your fish tank in packing paper, bubble wrap, and moving blankets. Pillows may be placed inside the tank, and padding should be taped in place. This step may be tedious and time-consuming, but it’s crucial for protecting the large glass faces.</p>
<h3>6. Move the Fish Tank Carefully</h3>
<p>Even when they’re empty, fish tanks are surprisingly heavy. Never try to move your aquarium alone. Twisting or shifting the tank can damage its seals, and the heavy load could also cause a back injury. It&#8217;s essential to decide how to move a fish tank before even lifting it. With one person holding each end of the fish tank, slowly carry it to the moving vehicle, and provide a flat resting place for travel. Plan your route and its spot in the moving van before picking it up.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you have hired a moving company, then make sure they can move the fish tank in their moving truck. Some companies don&#8217;t allow this.</p></blockquote>
<h3>7. Prepare the Fish Tank for Transit</h3>
<p>Your fish tank should be protected to avoid damage during travel. Make sure the aquarium is covered in padding and resting on a flat surface. Also, do not place any items on top of your fish tank. After it&#8217;s in place, trap or tie the tank in place to avoid it sliding and shifting during travel.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you have a small or medium tank, try to transport both the tank and fish in your personal vehicle.</p></blockquote>
<h3>8. Set Up Your Aquarium in Your New Home</h3>
<p>Upon arriving to your new home, tending to your live pets should be your first priority. Set your aquarium up as soon as possible after reaching your destination, before <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">unpacking your other belongings</a>.</p>
<p>The spot you&#8217;ve chosen for your fish tank should have a firm surface. It should also provide easy access to the electrical outlet needed to power the working units of the aquarium.</p>
<p>Follow these steps to set up your aquarium:</p>
<ol>
<li>Place your fish tank on the stand, retape the background material, and add the sand or gravel.</li>
<li>Put the artificial decorations in place.</li>
<li>Install the power strips and filters, but leave them unplugged.</li>
<li>Fill your tank halfway with the old aquarium water you transported in pails.</li>
<li>Put the live plants in place, and add the remaining old water.</li>
<li>Gently add fish to the tank. If you transported your fish in bags, then place the entire bag into the tank, and give your fish time to adjust. Use your fish net to transfer fish from their buckets.</li>
<li>Top off the tank with new, treated water, not just tap water.</li>
<li>Plug in the filters, circulation pumps, and heater.</li>
</ol>
<p>When you&#8217;re learning how to move a fish tank, you should be aware that it will likely take your fish a few days to adjust to their new surroundings and recover from the stress of the move. Leave the light off for the first 24 hours, and also avoid introducing food. Feed your fish sparingly at first. Don&#8217;t worry if it takes them some time to return to their normal diet, but make sure they aren’t demonstrating <a href="https://www.avma.org/resources/pet-owners/petcare/got-sick-fish" target="_blank">these potential signs of disease</a> in their new home.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If possible, investigate your new home before the move and decide where your aquarium will be placed.</p></blockquote>
<p>Learning how to move a fish tank will help you keep your fish safe and also avoid potential damage to the tank. Moving large aquariums is a difficult procedure, but it isn&#8217;t impossible.  Then follow these additional <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-and-packing-tips-the-ultimate-guide-to-relocating-your-home/">moving and packing tips</a> so you can also settle into your new home.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-fish-tank-pet-fish/">How to Move a Fish Tank and Your Pet Fish</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Move to a New State: A Quick Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-to-a-new-state/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-to-a-new-state/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 10 Nov 2020 19:00:09 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move to a new state]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6591</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Moving can be a stressful event, even when you&#8217;re just moving to a new city. It&#8217;s even more challenging if you&#8217;re relocating to a state you have never visited before. It involves demanding and activities like packing, shipping your belongings, and setting up your new house. You might also need to rent storage facilities as [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-to-a-new-state/">How to Move to a New State: A Quick Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Moving can be a stressful event, even when you&#8217;re just <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-new-city/">moving to a new city</a>. It&#8217;s even more challenging if you&#8217;re relocating to a state you have never visited before. It involves demanding and activities like packing, shipping your belongings, and setting up your new house. You might also need to rent storage facilities as you look for a home that suits your needs. Are you planning to relocate to another state? Read on to learn how to move to a new state in an organized manner.</p>
<h2>Step One: Visit in Advance</h2>
<p>To avoid unpleasant surprises, make at least one trip to the place you&#8217;re looking to stay in the other state before moving. A brief tour can give you a feel of the township or neighborhood you&#8217;ll be calling home.</p>
<p>Bring a guide book, map, and mobile navigation app, or ask someone for recommendations and directions. A quick internet search can also provide tons of information about the location. Locate essential facilities like schools, health centers, attractions, malls, and eateries. Research the cost of living, know your new state tax, and get a feel for the new prices. You can also check out the job market.</p>
<h2>Step Two: Find a Suitable House</h2>
<p>Once you&#8217;ve identified your favorite neighborhoods, work with a reputable realtor or real estate agent to find a house or apartment that meets your needs. Different states have different building styles — the houses in New York will be very different from houses in Texas or Florida, for example. A professional who understands the local market will help with paperwork and all the legal aspects of renting a home. Remember — renters have more flexibility on their address, so don&#8217;t commit to buying a new home until you know you like your new state.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move to a New State:</h4>
<p>Consider a lease agreement that expires within a few months so you can decide whether to keep the house or move.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step Three: Seek Your Employer&#8217;s Support</h2>
<p>One of the most useful strategies for an interstate move is asking for relocation assistance from your employer. It works best when your move is work-related. Your employer can pay all or part of your moving expenses. Some companies will even offer a housing stipend to cushion you from financial stress.</p>
<h4>How to Move to Another State Without a Job</h4>
<p>What is it like moving to a new state without a job? If you are currently unemployed, it&#8217;s advisable to first find a new job in the new state. A long-distance move usually comes with considerable expenses, both planned and unplanned. Find a source of income to cover your living expenses after arrival.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move to a New State:</h4>
<p>Start budgeting and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/save-money-fast/">save enough money</a> to last you several weeks as you settle down and find a job.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step Four: Create a To-Do List for Your Current Home</h2>
<p>Your current city has been your home for quite a while, and it has formed many memorable moments for you. Decide what to do before relocating to the other state. Some essential and fun to-dos include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Bid your friends and colleagues farewell.</li>
<li>Visit the places you have never been.</li>
<li>Cancel local memberships and subscriptions.</li>
<li>Schedule to transfer your utility services.</li>
<li>Collect contacts from your loved ones.</li>
<li>Apply for a change of address with the USPS so your mail will get forwarded to your new address.</li>
<li>Update your address with various institutions.</li>
<li>Schedule your move date with professional movers.</li>
<li>Organize a farewell party.</li>
</ul>
<p>If you are going away for good, it&#8217;s vital to not leave behind any unfinished business. Create a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">week-by-week checklist of things to do</a> when formulating a plan for how to move to a new state so you don&#8217;t forget important steps.</p>
<h2>Step Five: Pare Down Your Belongings</h2>
<p>Every house has some unnecessary items and trash. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-things/">Decluttering your home</a> is crucial if you want to simplify moving to a new state. There is no need to move things you don&#8217;t use, as they will only increase the amount of work and bloat your moving costs.</p>
<p>Take stock of your belongings and decide what makes sense to ship and what doesn&#8217;t. Consider selling bulky items and tossing away outdated and unserviceable things. Also, find an appropriate place to store your car if you are planning to come back, and contact your car insurance company to get a less comprehensive policy.</p>
<h3>Items to Leave Behind</h3>
<ul>
<li>Furniture that can&#8217;t fit in your new home</li>
<li>Extra appliances that you don&#8217;t use</li>
<li>Old and wrong-sized clothing</li>
<li>Broken appliances</li>
<li>Old automobiles</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move to a New State:</h4>
<p>To eliminate unwanted things, run a yard sale, list them online, take them to a thrift store, or donate them to a charity. The less you have, the easier it is to move your belongings cross-country.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step Six: Develop a Packing Strategy</h2>
<p>Packing can be a hassle, and it&#8217;s one of the time-consuming parts of moving. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-hacks-hopelessly-disorganized/">You can&#8217;t stuff things into boxes without a plan</a>. Classify things by type – for instance, utensils cannot go with toiletries. Fragile items may require extra cushioning, and you might need to isolate vital documents and valuables.</p>
<p>Have a separate box for the essentials you will need right after arriving at your new home. Non-essentials like home décor elements, books, and anything you can do without can rest at the bottom of the packing boxes. Be sure to label every package for an easy time when unpacking.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move to a New State:</h4>
<p>Start sorting and packing non-essentials weeks before the move to avoid getting overwhelmed at the last minute.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step Seven: How to Move to a New State With Professional Movers</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6593" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Young-woman-interacting-with-movers-at-her-new-home.jpg" alt="Young woman interacting with movers at her new home" width="1254" height="837" /></p>
<p>Hiring a renowned interstate moving company to help with your relocation can take a massive burden off your shoulders. However, you must learn <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">how to hire the right movers</a> to avoid a raw deal or scam. Ensure that the moving company has the right resources to facilitate the move from your current home to the final destination. If you want to handle a DIY move, look for a rental truck company that fits your needs.</p>
<h3>Pointers of a Reputable Moving Company</h3>
<ul>
<li>Registration and Licensing: All registered interstate moving companies in the United States have a unique USDOT Number granted by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA).</li>
<li>Experience: A moving company can only survive in business for years if it satisfies its customers.</li>
<li>Positive Reviews: Customer reviews on reputable sites like Yelp and the Better Business Bureau can suggest whether you should trust a given moving service.</li>
<li>Intermediary Stations: Having locations in your current state and where you&#8217;re moving is a sign of a company that will deliver your items.</li>
</ul>
<p>Due diligence before hiring a mover is a critical part of how to move to a new state. Contact a few moving companies and compare their quotes.</p>
<p>Beware of a company that gives an estimate over the phone or internet without assessing your belongings. Additionally, don&#8217;t rush to hire someone who quotes an amount below the market average.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move to a New State:</h4>
<p>Run a USDOT Number search to verify the mover&#8217;s identity, safety rating, crash information, and inspection summary.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step Eight: “Establish Domicile” in the New State</h2>
<p>Once you have moved, establish domicile to prove yourself a legal permanent resident of the new state. It will help with your taxes. Check your state&#8217;s website for information on establishing domicile.</p>
<p>Note that you may have to file two tax returns for the year of relocation unless you&#8217;re moving from or to an income tax-free state. Most tax software solutions can guide you through the process.</p>
<h2>Step Nine: Apply for Another Driver&#8217;s License</h2>
<p>Chances are you will want to drive in your new state. If so, you will need to get a new driver&#8217;s license from the local Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). Check your state&#8217;s requirements — some have a time window for new residents to obtain their licenses.</p>
<p>Typical requirements for transferring your driver&#8217;s license include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Your current driver&#8217;s license</li>
<li>Proof of your social security number</li>
<li>Proof of residency</li>
</ul>
<p>The DMV can request for any additional information they deem necessary.</p>
<h2>Step Ten: How to Move to a New State Alone</h2>
<p>Science links loneliness and social isolation to <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/aging/publications/features/lonely-older-adults.html" target="_blank">many health issues</a>, including physical, mental, and cognitive problems. If you happen to move to a new location alone, go out and make some new friends.</p>
<p>Create social connections with your coworkers and groups that relate to your interests. If you can, relocate to a new state during the warmer seasons when people are out in social places. If you can, come with your pet and get a license on time so your big move is less lonely.</p>
<h2>Now That You Know How to Move to a New State, What&#8217;s Next?</h2>
<p>Once you&#8217;ve settled into your new home, it&#8217;s time to relax. Reach out to old friends to stay connected or start getting involved in your new community. You can also <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/throw-housewarming-party/">throw a house warming party</a> after making a few friends. It&#8217;s an excellent way to meet your neighbors, acquire more friends, and get acquainted with the new state.</p>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-to-a-new-state/">How to Move to a New State: A Quick Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Ultimate Guide to College Storage</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/guide-to-student-college-storage/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/guide-to-student-college-storage/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Sun, 08 Nov 2020 22:01:57 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Colton Gardner]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Self Storage]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[College Advice]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Frugal Living]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Life Hacks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Renter]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.storewithneighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=2015</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>As a student, summer plans can be a little unpredictable. Will you have a job? Can you afford a storage unit? Will you live in a dorm room near school? Will you move home? And what are you going to do with your belongings in the meantime? It can easily be a stressful situation. Finding affordable [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/guide-to-student-college-storage/">Ultimate Guide to College Storage</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>As a student, summer plans can be a little unpredictable. Will you have a job? Can you afford a storage unit? Will you live in a dorm room near school? Will you move home? And what are you going to do with your belongings in the meantime? It can easily be a stressful situation. Finding affordable college storage shouldn&#8217;t add to this stress.</p>
<p>We&#8217;ve got your guide to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/college-storage?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">renting college storage</a> to help alleviate some of this stress and make your college experience even better.</p>
<h2><b>Reasons for college student storage</b></h2>
<p>There are multiple reasons why you might need storage as a college student:</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Homeward bound.</strong> Going home for the summer to be with family or friends is always a needed repreve after a long spring semester. But what happens when you live 4 hours away by plane? Don’t bother with the hassle of packing everything up and shipping or trucking it back. You will actually save money by looking for cheap student storage nearby and renting until school starts again.</li>
<li><strong>Summer sales.</strong> Many ambitious students plan to move away and dream of being a top salesman while practically minting cash during their summer sales job.</li>
<li><strong>Internships.</strong> Depending on the length and location of the internship, it might not be worth it to lug all of your belongings out to a new place. Better to live out of a few suitcases and have everything waiting for when you get back.</li>
<li><strong>Study abroad.</strong> Now these definitely have a time limit, and you generally will be returning to school the following semester. Store your belongings close by for your return and then travel without worrying.</li>
<li><strong>Small apartments or dorms.</strong> College housing is famous for packing as much as possible into as little as possible. You might move-out of a tiny dorm room into an apartment that already has a TV or doesn’t have enough space for that mini-fridge you have. If you don’t want to sell/give away what doesn’t fit, consider storage.</li>
</ul>
<h2>What size storage unit does a college student need?</h2>
<p><strong>Unless you own a home you don’t need anything larger than a 5 x 10 unit and the majority of students don&#8217;t need more than a 5 x 5 unit. </strong>Unfortunately, these storage spaces get rented the fastest in spring in college towns.</p>
<p>Here are some examples of what might be the right college storage unit for you:</p>
<ul>
<li>5 x 5 &#8211; The size of a small walk-in closet. Can hold small furniture, boxes, clothes, small electronics.</li>
<li>5 x 10 &#8211; The size of a larger walk-in closet. Can hold furniture, mattresses, boxes, small appliances/electronics.</li>
<li>10 x 10 &#8211; The size of a small bedroom. Can hold the complete furnishings of a one bedroom apartment (Aka boxes, appliances, furniture, etc.).</li>
<li>10 x 15 &#8211; The size of a small garage. Can hold the furnishings of a two bedroom apartment (including major appliances and even a small vehicle).</li>
</ul>
<p>These are the standard storage unit sizes. The great thing about <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/college-storage?utm_source=blog">renting college storage through Neighbor</a> is that there is a wide variety of storage shapes and sizes (plus, did I mention <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/mobile?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">we have a mobile app</a>?). From closets for textbooks to garages for your vehicle, Neighbor&#8217;s got your back.</p>
<a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog"><img class="aligncenter wp-image-3157" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Display-ads_renters_finals_Self-storage_728x90-1-1.png" alt="Rent Neighbor Storage at 50% the cost" width="100%" /></a>
<h2><b>How can you save money using self storage as a student?</b></h2>
<p>Expenses are one of the biggest concerns of any college student. However, there are many ways you can save money on college storage.</p>
<ul>
<li><strong>Plan early for the best pricing</strong>. Storage prices often go up in the summer, especially in college towns. The smallest sizes often go fast as well. Start your search for summer storage as soon as possible to get the cheapest prices and avoid having to rent a larger unit than needed.</li>
<li><strong>Maximize the space</strong>. Don’t get stuck paying extra for a storage space you don’t fully use. Find somewhere that has the shape and size you need. With Neighbor&#8217;s wide variety of storage options, you can custom fit your storage space to your belongings.</li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-things/"><strong>Declutter</strong></a>. Before you put anything into storage, evaluate if you really need it. If it only has been sitting in a box, it can probably go. Less stuff means less storage and that means more money saved.</li>
<li><strong>Buddy up</strong>. Find a friend that wants to go in on a unit and split the cost. Some storage facilities will allow you to split the agreement, so you are each responsible for your portion. Especially if you both don’t have too many things to store, you could get the most bang for your buck. Then you two can go on that European study abroad without any worries!</li>
<li><strong>Avoid hiring movers or paying for pick-up</strong>. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Hiring movers</a> can be a great idea for big moves or when storing large amounts of furniture. This likely isn&#8217;t necessary as a college or university student. While it does take more time compared to paying for moving services, using your own vehicle (or finding friends with trucks) can help save large amounts of money while storing as a student.</li>
<li><b>Use a storage calculator</b>. Use a <a href="https://www.lifestorage.com/storage-units/storage-unit-size-estimator/" target="_blank">storage unit size calculator</a> to see what size storage space you really need. Chances are you could be overestimating.</li>
</ul>
<p><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-2016" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/student-storage-570x320.jpg" alt="Find student storage with Neighbor" width="80%" alt="College storage" srcset="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/student-storage-570x320.jpg 570w, https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/student-storage-570x320-300x168.jpg 300w" sizes="(max-width: 570px) 100vw, 570px" /></p>
<h2>Summer storage vs. Bringing things home</h2>
<p>The advantages of moving everything home for the summer are that you have all of your things close at hand and don&#8217;t need to pay for a place to store it all. While that may sound nice, you actually might be losing money and time by moving everything home. While home is a great place to mooch off your parents or siblings (mom&#8217;s amazing home cooked dinners, for instance), you really don’t need your snowboard and calculator with you over the summer.</p>
<p>By sticking to the bare necessities and instead using a student storage unit (especially with Neighbor), you could save money in a variety of ways:</p>
<ul>
<li>Paying for a truck to drive your things home could potentially be very expensive. It can cost up to $100 for just one trip, depending on where you are going. Neighbor prices on the other hand, are a small fraction of that number starting at $35.</li>
<li>If you are driving your own car, instead of filling the seats with your belongings, fill it with friends/neighbors and then split the gas cost for an overall cheaper and more eco-friendly trip.</li>
<li>Leave your things behind and fly on an inexpensive airline. It&#8217;s a fast and affordable way home. Plus, these type of airlines often make their money off of baggage fees so bringing the minimal amount of baggage can help you get extraordinarily cheap airfare.</li>
<li>The drive home can be pretty bumpy; avoid breaking or leaving behind items at home. A long drive can be dangerous with a full car weighed down, so be careful and consider your options beforehand.</li>
</ul>
<h2><b>Are there discounts for college storage?</b></h2>
<p>Many storage facilities will offer discounts for college or university students because they recognize the hassle of moving every so often. The beauty of Neighbor is that our normal prices are 50% cheaper than a storage facility discounted price. Year round, student or non-student, you can enjoy our affordable prices. Otherwise, make sure to look for somewhere that offers student storage discounts and take advantage of your student status.</p>
<h2><b>What items can you store?</b></h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Always check whether the item you want <a href="https://neighbor.com/storage-blog/need-climate-controlled-storage-unit/">to store needs a climate-controlled</a> environment. These are some typical storage items:</span></p>
<ul>
<li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Furniture (desks, couches, appliances, etc.)</span></li>
<li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Electronics (televisions, computers, printers/copiers, etc.)</span></li>
<li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bicycles (scooter, moped, etc.)</span></li>
<li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sports Equipment (skis, snowboard, golf clubs, etc.)</span></li>
<li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Linens (bed sets, towels, etc.)</span></li>
<li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Seasonal Apparel (snowshoes, snow clothes, etc.)</span></li>
</ul>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The basics you use around the house generally can be stored. You can take your clothes on a trip with you, some shoes, some toiletries, but all of that other stuff is going to need some place to stay or it all goes with you!</span></p>
<p>There will also be restrictions on what items you cannot store. These prohibited items often include perishable foods, plants and animals; explosives, firearms and ammunition; and flammables, toxic materials, fuels and chemicals.</p>
<h2><b>Should you store long-term?</b></h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sometimes you need long-term college storage for more than just a 3 month summer break (such as for a study abroad or long-term internship). Storing your things long-term can be a good solution to avoid having to ship all your items home or rent a larger apartment or college dorm while in school. In addition, some storage facilities (including Neighbor) offer first month discounts or move-in specials when you stay for multiple months.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are planning on storing something for an extended period of time, make sure you store it properly, as follows:</span></p>
<ul>
<li><b>Quality boxes</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">. It is worth it to have quality <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">moving boxes</a> that are durable and easily organized. You can even find sets of storage totes that make it easy to stack on one another to maximize your space.</span></li>
<li><b>Pallets</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Get your belongings off the ground with a pallet. This protects against flooding and other damage and also circulates the air. It’s always better to keep boxes and furniture off of the floor.</span></li>
<li><b>Climate control</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">. This is especially handy when you are storing belongings through a change in season. Don’t risk the damage that can come from extreme temperatures; wood furniture and electronics can be affected.</span></li>
<li><b>Vacuum sealed bags</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">. These are great for long term storage of linens and clothing.</span></li>
<li><b>Cleaning</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Clean whatever you are going to store beforehand. This will prevent mold from growing and keep your belongings in better condition.</span></li>
<li><span style="font-weight: 400;"><b>Friend follow-up</b></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">. It could be a good idea to have someone you know check on your belongings every once in a while or to drop off or pick up an item or two. Especially if you are <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/car-storage?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">storing a vehicle</a>, it could help to get out behind the wheel and keep it in good shape. And if anything ever goes wrong, you will have someone there to help you deal with it.</span></li>
</ul>
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         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/guide-to-student-college-storage/">Ultimate Guide to College Storage</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Moving for Seniors: The Ultimate Guide to Planning a Move</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-for-seniors-the-ultimate-guide-to-planning-a-move/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-for-seniors-the-ultimate-guide-to-planning-a-move/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 05 Nov 2020 19:00:51 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[seniors]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6582</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>A major move is an incredibly stressful endeavor. Whether you&#8217;re downsizing, moving into a new home closer to friends and loved ones, moving into a senior living community, or even moving in with a family member, you can find yourself struggling to handle the move. These moving tips for seniors can make the process much [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-for-seniors-the-ultimate-guide-to-planning-a-move/">Moving for Seniors: The Ultimate Guide to Planning a Move</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>A major move is an incredibly stressful endeavor. Whether you&#8217;re <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/downsizing-benefits-tips-and-cost-calculator/">downsizing</a>, moving into a new home closer to friends and loved ones, moving into a senior living community, or even moving in with a family member, you can find yourself struggling to handle the move. These moving tips for seniors can make the process much easier.</p>
<div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed//-KBcXIVA8I4" width="300" height="150" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div>
<h2>Step One: Take a Look at Your New Home</h2>
<p>Before you move, it&#8217;s important to carefully evaluate your new home. You need to know:</p>
<ul>
<li>How much space you&#8217;ll have</li>
<li>What the floor plan looks like</li>
<li>What room you have for storage</li>
<li>How closely you&#8217;ll share space with your neighbors</li>
<li>Any modifications you will need to make for overall safety</li>
</ul>
<p>Your new space may look substantially different from your current one. Many seniors need to downsize as they move into an assisted living facility or other new residence. If you&#8217;re moving from a full-size house to an apartment, you may need to reduce your furniture or arrange for storage. Knowing how much space you have available can make it easier to proceed with the moving process.</p>
<h2>Step Two: Evaluate What Help You Will Need</h2>
<p>For many seniors, moving is no longer nearly as simple as throwing all of their possessions into boxes and placing everything in the back of a moving truck. One of the most important moving tips for seniors is to be realistic about what you can accomplish on your own and when you will need assistance. Consider:</p>
<h3>Do You Need Help Packing Boxes?</h3>
<p>If bending down to place items in boxes or trying to move heavy boxes to the side of the room poses a significant physical challenge, you may want to arrange for help packing, unpacking, and shifting those boxes. Also, consider whether you have the skills to pack delicate objects, especially those that may be going into storage for a long time.</p>
<h3>Can You Move Furniture on Your Own?</h3>
<p>Most of our moving tips for seniors focus on planning and safety. You may need to move heavy furniture or pick up large boxes in order to manage your move on your own. If you struggle with those tasks, you may need to arrange for someone else to come in and help you.</p>
<h3>Do You Feel Overwhelmed by the Thought of Packing up Your Home?</h3>
<p>You have had years to accumulate a large range of possessions. For many seniors, packing and moving feels overwhelming. If you do not feel able to take on the task yourself, consider arranging for friends, family members, or professional movers to come in and help.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you don&#8217;t have friends and relatives helping with your move, a full-service moving company can make it much easier for you to manage your move. Contact local moving companies to learn more about what services they offer and what moving tips for seniors they have.</p></blockquote>
<h3>What Do You Need in a Moving Company?</h3>
<p>Many seniors find that working with a full-service moving company is an easier, more effective way to handle a major move. What do you need in a moving company? Carefully consider what services you need and evaluate whether the company you&#8217;re considering provides those services. If you want a moving company who will take care of your move from start to finish, the company needs to:</p>
<ul>
<li>Provide packing materials</li>
<li>Pack up your possessions</li>
<li>Handle disassembling furniture in your old home</li>
<li>Move your possessions</li>
<li>Store your possessions, if you have time between leaving your former home and moving into the new one</li>
<li>Unload your possessions</li>
<li>Reassemble furniture</li>
<li>Unpack</li>
<li>Carry out packing materials and other trash</li>
</ul>
<p>Most moving companies will allow you to choose the specific services you need based on your capability and the time you have available. Evaluate the services you need and your budget as you consider how you want to handle your move.</p>
<p>Also, consult the <a href="https://www.nasmm.org/" target="_blank">National Association of Senior Move Managers</a> to learn more about the available options for senior citizens planning a big move. Older adults may have specific needs, and senior movers have the tricks and moving tips for seniors that can help you achieve your goals.</p>
<p>As you&#8217;re considering a moving company, you may also want to ask questions about how they handle health care needs, including COVID-19 challenges. Do movers wear masks? Will they be allowed to move your possessions if they&#8217;re ill (or if they have come into contact with a sick individual)? Older adults, especially those with specific health care risks, may want to make sure the moving company takes appropriate precautions.</p>
<h2>Step Four: Create a Moving Timeline</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6586" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Adult-son-helping-his-mother-pack-her-belongings.jpg" alt="Adult son helping his mother pack her belongings" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Whether you&#8217;re moving across town into an assisted living community or making a long-distance move to a new state, you need a timeline that will help you plan for your move and keep everything on track. Moving can be stressful. A timeline can help prevent you from missing out on any of the important items on your to-do list.</p>
<p>Work backward to create an effective timeline. When do you plan to move into your new residence? You may have a specific move-in date, often issued by nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Alternatively, you may have more general guidelines — a plan to be in your new home by a certain date, but the freedom to move your plans a few days in either direction, for example.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Your move timeline will be based on how long you have to complete your move. If you&#8217;ve received little warning that a bed has come open in your preferred nursing home or that an assisted living community has an opening that you have to take advantage of immediately, you may need to move faster.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Moving Tips for Seniors Two Months Before the Move</h3>
<p>At least two months before your move, start preparing. Create an organization system. Will you use virtual moving checklists on your phone or computer, or do you want a hard copy list? What paperwork will you need for the move? Start a file on all that important paperwork. You will need to:</p>
<ul>
<li>Start thinking about downsizing, if necessary. What possessions do you plan to take with you? What possessions do you no longer want to keep?</li>
<li>Plan a yard sale, if needed. Set a date and plan to have everything ready to go by that time.</li>
<li>Collect your medical records, especially if you have a medical condition that needs to be monitored.</li>
<li>Research professional movers, if you haven&#8217;t already. Keep in mind that you may need to get on their schedule early.</li>
<li>Buy supplies for your move.</li>
<li>Set a moving budget. Moving can be expensive, and you need to know what funds you will have on hand.</li>
</ul>
<h4>What Supplies Do You Really Need For Your Big Move?</h4>
<p>As you prepare for your move, make sure you have the right supplies on hand. You will need:</p>
<ul>
<li>Boxes in multiple sizes</li>
<li>Packing materials, including packing peanuts, bubble wrap, or other padding for delicate items</li>
<li>Permanent markers for labeling boxes</li>
<li>A utility knife or scissors to help make opening and unpacking easier</li>
<li>Small plastic bags for screws and smaller items</li>
</ul>
<p>Your moving company may provide many of these supplies, especially if you opt for a full-service move. Consult your moving company to learn what supplies they have available and what you will need to purchase or prepare on your own.</p>
<h3>Moving Tips for Seniors One Month Before the Move</h3>
<p>As your move draws closer, you need to start making critical decisions and packing up your possessions. You may need to:</p>
<ul>
<li>Decide how you&#8217;re going to handle storing or rehoming possessions that you don&#8217;t want to take with you when you move.</li>
<li>Hold your yard sale.</li>
<li>Make sure you have movers scheduled, if needed.</li>
<li>Arrange for friends and family members to come help on the day of the move.</li>
<li>Notify utility companies, your landlord, and anyone else who needs to know that you&#8217;re planning to move out.</li>
<li>Schedule move-out inspections.</li>
<li>Start packing non-essential possessions, especially things you plan to place in storage or things you know you will not need before your move.</li>
<li>Book travel arrangements, if needed.</li>
<li>Make arrangements to cancel memberships and services you no longer need. This might include a membership to a local gym or senior center that you will no longer be able to access after your move.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Moving Tips for Seniors Three Weeks Before the Move</h3>
<p>With three weeks left before moving day, you need to:</p>
<ul>
<li>Make arrangements for moving your pets. Your moving company does not take care of this task. This is especially important if you&#8217;re planning a long-distance move and cannot transport your pets on your own.</li>
<li>Decide how you want to handle moving plants. You may not want to leave your plants, especially delicate ones, in the hands of the movers. Make arrangements for a friend or family member to move them if needed, or plan to drive them yourself.</li>
<li>Make arrangements to change your address with any regular deliveries or services that you use.</li>
<li>Notify banks, credit cards, insurance companies, and other providers about the coming address change. Officially file your <a href="https://moversguide.usps.com/mgo/disclaimer" target="_blank">change of address forms on the USPS website</a>, and handle all your other <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">change of address to-dos</a>.</li>
<li>Make plans for how you will handle the rest of your food. If you&#8217;re just moving across town, you may be able to move some of your food supplies. If you&#8217;re moving cross-country, on the other hand, you may want to plan to empty your freezer and fridge as much as possible ahead of time. Keep in mind that anything you have left over, you have to manage!</li>
<li>Arrange to transfer your home insurance, if needed.</li>
<li>Confirm dates to turn on utilities at your new home, if needed.</li>
<li>Keep packing.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Moving Tips for Seniors Two Weeks Before the Move</h3>
<p>You&#8217;re settling into crunch time, and you want to be sure that everything is ready to move into your new home. This week, you&#8217;ll need to:</p>
<ul>
<li>Pack up any particularly valuable items and arrange for how you want to handle them. This could include heirlooms or items to which you attach special memories. You may not want movers to handle some of your most valuable possessions, so make sure you know what you want to do with them!</li>
<li>Dispose of any dangerous items, like paint, industrial cleaners, or hazardous materials that you cannot move with you.</li>
<li>Create a plan for cleaning your home before you move out. If you have challenges like <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-mold-ultimate-guide/">mold</a>, make sure you have a plan for addressing them.</li>
<li>If you&#8217;re planning a long-distance move by car, get your car serviced this week so you know it will carry you safely to your destination.</li>
<li>Keep packing. Arrange for loved ones to come help you pack, if possible. If you&#8217;re having movers pack up for you, you may still want to pack up any items that require special care or that have significant sentimental value.</li>
<li>Create a plan for your &#8220;essentials&#8221; boxes and bags.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you need to arrange for a final cleaning before moving out, consider bringing in a cleaning service. It will help relieve stress since you won&#8217;t have to worry about handling the cleaning yourself. It will also ensure a deeper clean than many people can get on their own, increasing the odds that you&#8217;ll get your deposit back.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Moving Tips for Seniors One Week Before the Move</h3>
<p>Your move is getting closer. You may feel your stress mounting as your move gets ever closer. Make sure to take time to sit back and relax if you need it. Don&#8217;t be afraid to ask for help, especially as you wrap up the entire process.</p>
<ul>
<li>Confirm all the details. Make sure you confirm your dates with your moving company. If you&#8217;re moving into an assisted living facility or nursing home, check your move-in dates a final time.</li>
<li>Finish packing.</li>
<li>Clean out the cabinets and dispose of unneeded food in the freezer or fridge. Consider donating it or giving it to friends and family members.</li>
<li>Make any final plans for the big day.</li>
<li>Prepare your &#8220;essentials box&#8221; with items that you will need on your big day.</li>
<li>Arrange to move any items that won&#8217;t be going to your new home to storage.</li>
</ul>
<h4>What Items Need to Go in Your Essentials Box or Bags for Moving Day?</h4>
<p>There are some items that you will need immediately when you arrive at your new home. You will want to include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Enough clothes for a few days. Make sure to include clothes that you can get dirty. Unpacking can be a messy business.</li>
<li>Cleaning supplies, especially if you suspect you will need to deep clean your new home before you can move in</li>
<li>Toiletries</li>
<li>Toilet paper</li>
<li>Paper towels</li>
<li>Coffee maker and coffee</li>
<li>Pet food and dishes, if needed</li>
<li>Bedding</li>
<li>An emergency kit</li>
<li>A shower curtain, if needed</li>
<li>A towel (or towels, if you&#8217;re moving with your spouse)</li>
<li>Tools</li>
<li>Important records and paperwork</li>
<li>Your medications</li>
<li>A phone charger</li>
<li>Any other items you know you will need immediately or in the first couple of days after your move</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Consider buying an extra container of your most important toiletries so you can pack them in your essentials box ahead of time.</p></blockquote>
<h3>The Day of Your Move: Final Moving Tips for Seniors</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;ve followed all the preparation steps carefully, you&#8217;ll be ready by the time moving day arrives. Inevitably, surprises will crop up on the day of your move — but you&#8217;re prepared to handle them. On moving day, you should:</p>
<ul>
<li>Take a last look through the house to make sure you haven&#8217;t missed anything. Check for last-minute items you may have used the night before, including toiletries.</li>
<li>Meet your movers or the people helping with your move. Coordinate as needed.</li>
<li>Turn in your keys or any important paperwork.</li>
<li>Move to your new home!</li>
<li>Make sure that the movers take care of any necessary tasks, including reassembling furniture if that&#8217;s part of your contract. Double-check important items before they leave.</li>
</ul>
<h3>After the Move</h3>
<p>Unfortunately, your job isn&#8217;t done when you finish packing up your old home. Fortunately, however, the hardest part is now over. After you complete your move, make sure that you:</p>
<ul>
<li>Unpack.</li>
<li>Arrange for a new driver&#8217;s license if you&#8217;ve moved to a new state.</li>
<li>Register your car in your new location.</li>
<li>Make plans to meet friends and neighbors. If you&#8217;ve moved into an assisted living facility or nursing home, check out the schedule and learn what events you have available!</li>
</ul>
<h2>Step Five: Prepare to Downsize</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6587" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Older-couple-going-through-belongings-as-they-pack-for-a-move.jpg" alt="Older couple going through belongings as they pack for a move" width="1254" height="837" /></p>
<p>One key advantage of following these moving tips for seniors and getting started early is you can take your time at every stage of the move. Start by taking a look at your possessions. If you&#8217;re moving to a smaller home, including a nursing home or assisted living facility, you will need to find a way to reduce the number of possessions you will take with you on moving day.</p>
<p>For seniors moving into a smaller environment, you have several options for downsizing. Consider these moving tips for seniors who want to declutter and downsize:</p>
<ul>
<li>Sell specific items that have value but that you no longer want or need.</li>
<li>Donate items as needed. You may want to donate to a local shelter or find a secondhand store.</li>
<li>Hold a yard sale.</li>
<li>Give items to friends and family members.</li>
<li>Throw away items that you no longer want and that you cannot sell or give away.</li>
<li>Store items you will use periodically but which won&#8217;t fit in your new home. Choose a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ideal-storage-unit-features/">suitable storage unit or other storage space</a>. This might, for example, include holiday decorations.</li>
</ul>
<p>As you prepare to downsize, set aside a box or bag for each purpose. You may want to pack many of your possessions as you go to make it easier to get through each room.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Search for storage near you to learn what options you have available and what it will cost to store your possessions. This can make it easier for you to decide what will fit your budget and help you streamline what you want to keep.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Step Six: Start Packing</h2>
<p>Packing is the most stressful part of moving for most individuals. If you&#8217;re worried about what it will take to pack up your home and manage your possessions, remember, you do not have to do it alone. You can enlist help from caregivers, friends and family members, or professional movers. These packing and moving tips for seniors can also make the packing process easier.</p>
<ol>
<li>Start in an area of the house that you don&#8217;t use regularly. If you need to pack up a shed, garage, or workshop, those areas may be the easiest place to start. Don&#8217;t forget storage areas like the attic or basement. Save your primary living space for last.</li>
<li>Sort as you pack. Keep in mind that you will need to unpack and deal with anything you pack up now in your new environment. If you are relocating into a much smaller environment, be aggressive about sorting out items you will not need.</li>
<li>Label boxes, furniture, and other possessions clearly. Consider using colored stickers to label items intended for different rooms.</li>
<li>Make the moving process slow and steady. Some senior citizens struggle with the cognitive tasks necessary to make a big move. Others have significant mobility-related challenges. By taking your move slow and steady, you may find that it&#8217;s easier to handle the challenges associated with your move.</li>
</ol>
<p>Remember to follow the schedule we outlined above so you have plenty of time to pack without feeling overwhelmed.</p>
<h2>Step Seven: Unpack</h2>
<p>Packing is the biggest part of the moving process and the part that can cause the most stress. Unpacking, however, brings with it its own challenges. As you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">plan to unpack</a>, consider these factors:</p>
<ul>
<li>If you&#8217;re moving out of your own home into a shared environment, work with your new roommate to share space effectively.</li>
<li>Unpack the kitchen first. It&#8217;s one of the most-used rooms in your home and will help you feel more at home in your new environment.</li>
<li>Take it a step at a time. Just like packing to move out, unpacking can be a process. Give yourself enough time to take care of all of the tasks on your list.</li>
<li>Arrange for help if you need it. You may need to direct friends and loved ones in where things go or simply trust that they can handle many of those tasks, like filling bookshelves or placing items in your linen closet.</li>
</ul>
<p>Making a move as an older adult can bring with it considerable stress and other challenges. With a solid plan in place and these moving tips for seniors in mind, however, you can reduce your stress and make the move easier to manage.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-for-seniors-the-ultimate-guide-to-planning-a-move/">Moving for Seniors: The Ultimate Guide to Planning a Move</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>The Ultimate Guide to DIY Moving</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 03 Nov 2020 19:00:43 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[DIY guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[packing]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6574</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>No matter how you face it, the complete moving process isn&#8217;t an easy job. Hiring professional movers can be expensive (plus, don&#8217;t forget to tip). Luckily, there&#8217;s another option. Do-It-Yourself (DIY) moving can be easily achievable if you take the time to prepare properly for the big day and learn the best DIY moving style [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/">The Ultimate Guide to DIY Moving</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>No matter how you face it, the <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">complete moving process</a> isn&#8217;t an easy job. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Hiring professional movers</a> can be expensive (plus, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">don&#8217;t forget to tip</a>). Luckily, there&#8217;s another option.</p>
<p>Do-It-Yourself (DIY) moving can be easily achievable if you take the time to prepare properly for the big day and learn the best DIY moving style for your needs. Before you tackle the job, it pays to have an organized plan.</p>
<p>This guide will help you learn everything you need to know for the big day.</p>
<div class='embed-container'><iframe src='https://www.youtube.com/embed/-8mZRULwj6Q' frameborder='0' allowfullscreen></iframe></div>
<h2>DIY Moving Options</h2>
<p>When you&#8217;re in charge of your move, you have options. If you drive a two-seater, you definitely don&#8217;t want to use it for a moving van. Renting a moving truck or moving container is still considerably cheaper than calling in a full service moving company. Consider the tools you have on hand and which DIY moving option will make the most sense for your situation.</p>
<p>Your options include:</p>
<h3>Renting a Moving Truck</h3>
<p>A moving truck rental has long been a popular choice for DIY moves. The reason is simple. The right-sized truck will likely fit all your belongings, making multiple trips unnecessary. Moving trucks are also relatively easy to load and unload and often come with a loading ramp. The most popular moving truck companies are <a href="https://www.uhaul.com/Truck-Rentals/" target="_blank">U-Haul</a>, <a href="https://www.pensketruckrental.com/" target="_blank">Penske</a>, and <a href="https://www.budgettruck.com/" target="_blank">Budget Truck Rentals</a>. Each of these companies offers a variety of truck sizes and different choices for truck pickup and return.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>DIY Moving Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Be sure you take proper measurements to ensure you get the right-sized moving truck. No matter how efficient you are at packing, you won&#8217;t be able to create space that isn&#8217;t there.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Self-Service DIY Moving</h3>
<p>This is a DIY option that provides you with the freedom to pack on your schedule and allow someone else to take the responsibility of transporting your belongings. You&#8217;ll get a storage container dropped off at your house, so you can pack and load your possessions according to the schedule that works for you. When the container is loaded, the company returns to pick it up and transport your belongings to your new home or a secure storage unit.</p>
<p>The most common companies for storage container rentals are <a href="https://www.pods.com/" target="_blank">PODS</a>, <a href="https://www.upack.com/" target="_blank">U-Pack</a>, and <a href="https://www.1800packrat.com/" target="_blank">Pack-Rat</a>. Container rentals provide you with the convenience of ground-level loading and eliminate the responsibility of driving a large truck.</p>
<h3>Going It Alone DIY Moving</h3>
<p>If you don&#8217;t have the funds to acquire a moving truck or storage container, you&#8217;re probably planning a DIY move the old-fashioned way. This means you&#8217;re depending on yourself and your personal vehicle to take care of all the heavy lifting. If you&#8217;re going it alone, hopefully your move isn&#8217;t a long-distance one and you have many friends to help.</p>
<p>This is the cheapest do-it-yourself moving option, but it also means you take on the most responsibility. If your volunteer helpers don&#8217;t show up or proper packing methods aren&#8217;t used, you could end up with damaged possessions or a delayed move. Full-scale DIY moving means you&#8217;re responsible for avoiding injuries, proper packing and loading, and ensuring everyone is safe on the road.</p>
<h2>Gathering Supplies for Your DIY Move</h2>
<p>Moving your belongings yourself will undoubtedly save you a considerable amount of money. But skimping on proper supplies could cost you the money you&#8217;ve saved or even more. When you plan a DIY move, it&#8217;s vital that you use the proper supplies to protect your possessions. Begin with a moving checklist to make sure you don&#8217;t forget anything and have a successful moving day.</p>
<h3>Supplies Needed for Your DIY Moving Day</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re thinking that whatever boxes you can find and a random roll of tape will prepare you for packing and moving everything you own, it&#8217;s time to think bigger. The right packing and moving supplies will keep your belongings safe, help avoid injury, eliminate hassle, and speed up the laborious tasks of packing and loading. Make sure you start your DIY move with these basic supplies.</p>
<ul>
<li>Moving Boxes: If possible, get a variety of different-sized boxes for your move. Overloading boxes can lead to damaged possessions and injuries.</li>
<li>Packing Tape (With a Dispenser!): Purchase several rolls of <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/">quality packing or storage tape</a> to keep your possessions secure through the many touchpoints of your move. A packing tape dispenser (or two) is a priceless tool for saving time while you pack. Your fellow packers will thank you.</li>
<li>Packing Materials: Yes, you need soft stuff to keep your valuable possessions safe. Packing materials like bubble wrap, foam wrap sheets, and packing paper will keep your fragile items safe during transport.</li>
<li>Moving Blankets: It&#8217;s easy to damage large pieces of furniture when attempting to clear tight corners and doorways.</li>
<li>Labeling Materials: Masking tape, markers, labeling tape, and stickers all make great materials for reminding you what&#8217;s inside your boxes. Your back will thank you when you know where your boxes belong in your new home.</li>
<li>Cargo Straps or Rope: Prevent heavy items from shifting during loading and transit with cargo straps or ropes.</li>
<li>Dollies and Hand Trucks: Injured helpers are a big risk during a DIY move. Protect yourself and others by using the proper tools to move heavy furniture and appliances.</li>
<li>Stretch Wrap: To protect furniture and movable items (like cabinet doors and drawers), a stretch wrap can be a great cover to keep everything in place.</li>
<li>Tool Set: While you might be planning to move every piece of furniture without any disassembly, your packing/loading space may disagree. A small toolset will make it easy to take apart and reassemble furniture in a pinch.</li>
<li>Garbage Bags: You can, and should, purge your home of things you no longer need while moving. Make sure you have plenty of heavy-duty garbage bags around for this purpose.</li>
<li>People: Friends, family members, or the neighbor&#8217;s kid who is willing to help out for a few dollars less than professional movers can be a major help when it&#8217;s time to empty your home of furniture and various belongings.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>DIY Moving Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Borrowing or renting moving equipment can help you save money.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Tips for Scoring the Right Moving Supplies</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6578" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Couple-packing-up-medium-sized-boxes.jpg" alt="Couple packing up medium-sized boxes" width="1254" height="837" /></p>
<p>It&#8217;s understandable that you want to save money. Still, that doesn&#8217;t mean you should attempt to Frankenstein boxes from the garbage or use every container you can get your hands on for packing. Try these tips to get the right supplies for moving without breaking the bank.</p>
<h3>Don&#8217;t Pay for Boxes</h3>
<p>There are many places where you can get <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">free moving boxes</a> or cheap used moving equipment.</p>
<h3>Pack Creatively</h3>
<p>Your suitcases, duffel bags, and other travel accessories are going with you to your new home. Use them to pack items like clothing and toiletries.</p>
<h3>Use Items You Already Own for Packing Supplies</h3>
<p>Linens, pillows, and blankets can be used for cushioning. Your child&#8217;s washable markers will work just as well for labeling boxes as those permanent markers you saw at the store.</p>
<h3>Buy Tape in Bulk</h3>
<p>You&#8217;ll need more tape than you think. Instead of risking the hazards of cheap tape, buy quality packing or storage tape in large packages.</p>
<h3>Plan Ahead</h3>
<p>You likely know you&#8217;re moving months before it&#8217;s time to pack. Save boxes and packing supplies (hello, free air pillows!) when you order products online during the months leading up to your move.</p>
<h2>Packing Tips for Any DIY Move</h2>
<p>Proper packing techniques mean you&#8217;ll be more likely to survive moving day without injury and your possessions will arrive at your new home or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">storage space</a> intact. While DIY moving saves money, it&#8217;s essential to use proper packing and moving procedures to keep your sanity intact while preparing to move to your new home.</p>
<h3>Start Early</h3>
<p>Even though you&#8217;re not moving for months, there&#8217;s no reason to wait until the last minute to start the packing process. Rushed packing leads to cutting corners and making mistakes that could leave you with broken or missing possessions. Start packing belongings that you don&#8217;t need for daily use 6 to 8 weeks before moving day.</p>
<h3>Purge</h3>
<p>If there was ever a time to notice how many things you have that you don&#8217;t really use, it&#8217;s when you&#8217;re preparing to load it all into a truck. During the weeks or months leading to your move, use a variety of techniques to get rid of things you can do without. Sell furniture, donate clothing, or hold a yard sale. Fewer belongings can fit into a smaller truck and limit the work ahead.</p>
<h3>Use Unique Resources</h3>
<p>The internet can be a wonderful place for both buying things you need and getting rid of things you don&#8217;t. Check out Craigslist for cheap and free moving supplies. While you&#8217;re at it, list those pieces of furniture you don&#8217;t want to take along for the move. Facebook Marketplace has similar options for local buying and selling.</p>
<h3>Don&#8217;t Skimp</h3>
<p>Not all boxes and tape are created equal. Make sure the boxes you use are actual moving boxes. Moving tape should be at least 2-3 inches wide and be labeled for packing, moving, or storage. Also, use moving paper — newspaper can leave ink stains on your possessions. Using cheap packing materials can cost you in the long run when you&#8217;re replacing damaged and broken items.</p>
<h3>Pack a Carry-On</h3>
<p>No matter how you plan to transport your belongings, it&#8217;s vital to pack a box of essential items that will travel with you in your personal vehicle. You don&#8217;t want to have to search through 100 boxes to find toilet paper and other household items you really can&#8217;t do without.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>DIY Moving Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Keep expensive items and important documents separate. These items should be labeled carefully and travel with you in your personal vehicle.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Safe Loading and Transport Tips</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6577" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Couple-packing-up-a-moving-truck-on-their-own.jpg" alt="Couple packing up a moving truck on their own" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>You finally have all your boxes packed, so the hard part is over — right? Not so fast. Loading and travel can be dangerous if you don&#8217;t know what you&#8217;re doing. Whether your trip takes you across town or across the country, safe traveling procedures are essential. Use these tips to load and transport your belongings to your new home safely.</p>
<h3>Start Early</h3>
<p>No matter how prepared you are and how many helpers are involved, moving day takes a lot of time and effort. You can count on unexpected complications and difficult situations, even if you&#8217;re only moving across town. A stress-free move occurs only with significant planning and extra time. There&#8217;s no penalty for getting to the new house a few hours early, and unpacking will be a breeze when you have more time than expected.</p>
<h3>Load Like the Pros</h3>
<p>While it may seem tempting to get as many boxes out of the way as possible, it&#8217;s essential to load the truck properly. Move heavy items like your refrigerator and washing machine first. These items should be placed near the front of the truck. Follow with large furniture items like couches, chairs, and dressers to line the sides of the truck. When it&#8217;s time to load boxes, put the largest, heaviest boxes on the bottom and pack up. Secure everything with straps or ropes as needed.</p>
<h3>Don&#8217;t Be a Hero</h3>
<p>No matter how many pounds you can lift at the gym, moving day is not the time to demonstrate your strength. Use proper lifting techniques and helpful tools to lift and load heavy items. A pulled muscle or back injury can leave you useless for the remainder of the move, or worse, land you in the hospital.</p>
<h3>Provide Snacks</h3>
<p>You can expect to spend several hours loading the truck. Even if everyone is feeling great, staying hydrated is essential. Be sure to have plenty of water and other non-caffeinated drinks available along with healthy snacks. Even if you plan to provide a meal for movers at the end of the day, it&#8217;s vital to keep hydration and blood-sugar levels elevated while completing strenuous tasks.</p>
<h3>Hire a Babysitter</h3>
<p>Moving is exhausting. If you have small children, hiring a babysitter while you load the truck or even for the duration of the move can make things easier for you and your children. Be sure to book the day several weeks in advance with the babysitter and tip generously. Moving is a stressful time for pets, as well. A pet sitter can keep your pets away from the chaos of packing and loading the truck.</p>
<h3>Invest in Moving Insurance</h3>
<p>No matter what vehicle you use to transport your belongings, your auto insurance likely won&#8217;t be sufficient coverage if something happens on moving day. Even if you never use it, insurance will provide protection and peace of mind. Whether you secure your insurance from a rental truck company or independent provider, make sure you understand the details of the policy.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>DIY Moving Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Have your personal vehicle serviced before moving day. Long trips can be hard on vehicles, and the last thing you need is to delay your arrival with a breakdown.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How Do I Drive a Moving Truck?</h2>
<p>Take special precautions when driving a large vehicle like a moving truck, like driving slower than usual and noting traffic signs for trucks.</p>
<p>This is an excellent question for any DIY mover. Unlike most large trucks, you don&#8217;t need a commercial license to drive a moving truck. This means you can drive one even if you&#8217;ve never been behind the wheel of any truck. When you&#8217;re driving a moving truck, take these precautions.</p>
<ul>
<li>Slow down. You don&#8217;t have to drive at the speed limit, and you definitely shouldn&#8217;t be speeding. Large, heavy vehicles are more difficult to handle and take longer to stop.</li>
<li>Watch for traffic signs designed for trucks. Signs about weigh station stops, truck or lane restriction signs, and overhead clearance postings will be important safety markers for your journey.</li>
<li>Avoid tailgating and apply brakes early. Large, heavy trucks take longer to come to a complete stop than other vehicles.</li>
<li>Give yourself extra turning room. Large trucks need extra clearance to successfully make a turn.</li>
<li>Take your time when switching lanes. Always use your turn signal and check your side mirror when switching lanes. A moving truck is longer than your typical vehicle, and you need to allow ample space between yourself and other vehicles.</li>
</ul>
<h2>7 DIY Moving Mistakes to Avoid</h2>
<p>It&#8217;s no secret that innovative people have been packing up their belongings and moving without the help of professional moving companies for centuries. That doesn&#8217;t mean the job is easy. When it comes to DIY moving, the things you shouldn&#8217;t do are easily as important as the things you should do. Avoid these mistakes for a safe and effective moving day.</p>
<h3>1. Forgetting to Have Your Utilities Turned on in Advance</h3>
<p>You don&#8217;t want your first night or weekend in your new home to be one without lights, water, or heat. Make sure you consult the local companies responsible for turning on the electricity, water, and even cable and internet at least a week before moving day.</p>
<h3>2. Underestimating the Amount of Time Moving Takes</h3>
<p>Packing and moving all of your belongings and moving them to another home isn&#8217;t easy. That&#8217;s why the pros get paid to take care of the whole mess for you. Plenty of time quickly becomes no time as moving day approaches. Putting off packing till the last minute or sleeping in on moving day could lead to mistakes that leave you with damaged or misplaced possessions or even leave you needing your rental truck for an extra day.</p>
<h3>3. Assuming You&#8217;re Capable of Driving a Moving Truck</h3>
<p>A moving truck isn&#8217;t a bigger version of your car. It&#8217;s an entirely different beast that will be heavily loaded, have limited visibility, and use a lot of gas. If you&#8217;ve never driven a large truck, consider hiring a professional or using a storage container for your move. At the very least, you should prepare by learning about the different techniques used when driving large vehicles. Even a local move can get complicated if you can&#8217;t get the truck from point A to point B without getting stuck on a difficult turn or low overpass.</p>
<h3>4. Overloading Boxes</h3>
<p>You may be a packing champion but moving with fewer boxes is a bad idea. Overly heavy boxes lead to injuries, damaged possessions, and a more difficult loading process. Pack heavy items in small boxes, in-between items in medium boxes, and light, airy items (like large cushions and bedspreads) in large boxes. Never pack any of your boxes heavier than 50 pounds.</p>
<h3>5. Assuming People Will Be Available and Eager to Help You Move</h3>
<p>Gathering helpers to help you pack up your belongings and safely remove them from your old house is a great idea. Asking them at the last minute is a rookie mistake. Sure, your friends and family may be willing to help you move, but they don&#8217;t want to cancel previous plans to do it. Moving is a large job, and everyone involved should be properly prepared.</p>
<h3>6. Failing to Admit Defeat</h3>
<p>Maybe you didn&#8217;t start packing early enough. Perhaps you can&#8217;t lift the couch on your own. If you&#8217;re not able to meet your DIY moving goals for one reason or another, don&#8217;t be too proud to ask for help. Call friends or family members for last-minute help. Consider the use of services like HireAHelper, or even hire movers instead of botching your move.</p>
<h3>7. Ignoring Safety Rules</h3>
<p>Assuming (or pretending) you know how to do everything is never a good idea. Using a questionable rope to lower your couch from a second-floor window may make you a sensation on YouTube, but it&#8217;s likely to end in disaster. Instead of blundering through a job you don’t know how to do, take the time to learn how to move furniture and appliances. While you&#8217;re at it, check local ordinances for overloaded vehicles, laws about transporting items on the roof of a car, and requirements for driving a moving truck.</p>
<p>A DIY move isn&#8217;t impossible, but it&#8217;s not a task that should be taken lightly. Proper organization and preparation are key if you hope to get everything to your new home in one piece. It’s also important to get the right materials, including packing tape, for the job. When your move is complete and you&#8217;ve had a moment to relax, take time to reach out to everyone who offered a helping hand to offer thanks or even a thoughtful gift. Moving is hard work, but the accomplishment is well worth the struggle.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
      </a>
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      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-guide-diy-moving/">The Ultimate Guide to DIY Moving</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Ultimate Guide to Home Organization</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-organization-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-organization-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 03 Nov 2020 05:00:59 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Home Organization]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6606</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Home organization is just a combination of two things: decluttering &#038; storage. Check out these guides for decluttering &#038; creating practical storage space.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-organization-guide/">Ultimate Guide to Home Organization</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Is there anything better than a perfectly organized home?</p>
<p>Home organization might not be everyone’s favorite activity, but there are benefits to making the time to keep things clean and tidy: Less mess equals less stress. No, really — science backs that up.</p>
<p><span id="more-6606"></span></p>
<p>There are many benefits to maintaining a clean and organized home, from <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-truisms-wellness/201607/the-powerful-psychology-behind-cleanliness" target="_blank">reducing anxiety</a> by promoting a calm and productive environment to saving time and money from reducing the need to search for things, or buying replacements for lost items. No matter what your reason is for focusing on home organization, we know how overwhelming the process can be. Don’t be intimidated by the idea of organizing your entire home at once — use this <strong>Ultimate Home Organization Guide</strong> to help you execute organizing one room at a time.</p>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9; height: 72px;" width="695">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>PRO TIP:</strong> Mastering the art of home organization can lead to more free space around your home that you can then <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/host?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">rent out as storage units using Neighbor</a>, giving you extra income every month.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<h3>Jump to a room you want to organize…</h3>
<p><a href="#basics">Where to Start<br />
</a><a href="#entryway">Mudroom or Entryway<br />
</a><a href="#kitchen">Kitchen<br />
</a><a href="#living">Living Room<br />
</a><a href="#bathroom">Bathrooms<br />
</a><a href="#bedroom">Bedrooms<br />
</a><a href="#closet">Closets<br />
</a><a href="#office">Home Office<br />
</a><a href="#garage">Garage</a></p>
<div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed//L55oWetjUB0" width="300" height="150" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div>
<div id="basics"></div>
<h2>Home Organization Tips: Where to Start</h2>
<p>Home organization is really just a combination of two things: decluttering and storage.</p>
<p>For decluttering, begin by removing all the items you don’t want to keep, items you no longer need, or items don&#8217;t use anymore.</p>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong><b>Decluttering Guides:</b></strong><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/declutter-your-home-15-decluttering-cleaning-tips-for-your-home/">15 Decluttering Tips for Your Home</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/9-home-organization-services-help-declutter/" target="_blank">List of Home Organization Services to Help Declutter</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-things/">The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering Your Home</a></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>Then, for storing, use storage containers and solutions to give all the remaining items a home where they’re neatly put away and easy to find when you need them.</p>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>Storage Guides:</strong><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-storage-solutions-top-15-home-storage-ideas/">15 Top Home Storage Ideas</a><br />
● <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/smart-storage-ideas/">39 Smart Storage Ideas for Small Spaces and Tiny Houses</a></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<h2>Mudroom or Entryway Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6607" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/01-Entryway.png" alt="entryway organization" width="1793" height="386" /><br />
The mudroom or entryway is a major part of your home — it’s where everyone first enters, so it&#8217;s the first welcoming impression of your home for you, your family, and your guests.</p>
<h3>Common problems with entryway organization</h3>
<p>As a top high-trafficked area of the home, it’s also very prone to accumulating clutter and piling on messes. There are two common problems when facing organization of your entryway or mudroom area:</p>
<ul>
<li>Entryways and mudrooms can easily become “drop zones” for shoes, bags, hats, coats, keys, backpacks, equipment, and all kinds of other clutter.</li>
<li>As the area that provides the first impression of your home when guests arrive, an untidy entryway may set a messy tone for your guests upon arrival or add to your own anxieties upon entering after a long, stressful day.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Entryway organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Declutter by removing everything on the floor and any surfaces in the room.</li>
<li>Put away anything that doesn’t belong in the entryway or mudroom.</li>
<li>Hang hooks on the walls (one for each family member) in an area that’s practical, yet won’t be in the way when people are moving in or out of the home.</li>
<li>If needed, create storage in the entryway. Coat racks, cabinets, console tables, or a storage bench are all popular choices. There are many DIY projects for creating entryway storage by cleverly reusing bookcases, wooden crates, floating shelves, IKEA furniture and other items.</li>
<li>Keep a box near the front door of your home for decluttering the entire space. Every time you come across an item you don’t want or need, put it in the box. When it gets full, grab it on your way out to throw away or recycle. Then, put the box back and keep decluttering.</li>
<li>If you have a desk, table, or console in the entryway, clean out the drawers. Odds are, they’ve become a little bit of a catch-all. Put away anything that doesn’t specifically need to live in the entryway.</li>
<li>Make use of the wall space. A wall organizer, a chalkboard for keeping up on family events, or a wall shelf for more storage are all good entryway ideas for an organized home.</li>
<li>If you need a “drop zone” for things like wallets and keys, designate one small space, like a small plate or bowl in the entryway. Clean it regularly so it doesn’t attract unnecessary clutter.</li>
<li>Give each member of your family their own area — a hook on the wall, shelving, or a cubby, for example — in the entryway or mudroom. Then, all their coats, backpacks, scarves, and other items have a specific place to live.</li>
<li>Never underestimate the power of a shoe rack to help clean up an entryway or mudroom. Having shoes on the floor takes up space, especially in a small entryway, and looks messy. Invest in a shoe rack with plenty of space to keep everyone’s shoes tucked away, rather than in a pile taking up valuable square footage.</li>
<li>Make seasonal swaps to save space. For example, during summer, there’s no need to have winter coats hanging on wall hooks or on hangers in the closet. Instead, move them to a box or bin, or put them away in the basement or attic.</li>
<li>Be mindful of the elements. The entryway is the place most likely to become damaged by people tracking in water, snow, and dirt. Keep this in mind as you choose materials for the floor in this room, or invest in a good, sturdy doormat to help protect the floor.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Entryway_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Entryway Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<div id="kitchen"></div>
<h2>Kitchen Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6608 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/02-Kitchen.png" alt="Kitchen Organization" width="1793" height="386" /><br />
There’s a reason the kitchen is built at the center of so many homes: It’s truly the heart of a house, and central to so many activities, from family time to holiday celebrations to entertaining.</p>
<h3>Common problems with kitchen organization</h3>
<ul>
<li>Because the kitchen is a space that’s used so frequently, it’s easy for it to become messy and cluttered.</li>
<li>Kitchens contain a variety of items in a variety of places, which can feel overwhelming.</li>
<li>Food, sauces, perishables and pantry items can add to the messes, beyond typical clutter.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Kitchen organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Declutter by removing everything from the floor, surfaces, drawers, and cabinets.</li>
<li>Put away anything that doesn’t belong in the kitchen.</li>
<li>Keep a “junk drawer” in the kitchen that becomes a home for everything that doesn’t have a home. This is a magnet for clutter, so do away with the junk drawer if you can! If you really need it, limit it to one small drawer and use drawer organizers, dividers, and labels to keep it tidy and reserved for things that need to live there.</li>
<li>Avoid the temptation to leave items on the counter. Try to only keep items on the counter if you use them very often. Think a spice rack and a knife block, not a bulky mixer that only gets used once a year.</li>
<li>Remove anything you aren’t going to keep (like duplicate kitchen utensils or appliances you don’t use), and then put items away in the places you want them to live.</li>
<li>Get creative with storage in cabinets and drawers. Use small containers to organize drawers, especially if you have any deep drawers. Use shelves, tension rods, racks, bins, turntables, caddies, and other storage solutions to create a cabinet organization system that works for your storage space and your needs.</li>
<li>Check out your local thrift store for creative storage solutions like woven baskets, bins, jars, and more. You can often come out with great finds at a cheap price.</li>
<li>kitchen storage solutions available. Shelves and racks for inside kitchen cabinets, fridge and freezer storage, pan racks, cabinet organizers, and more are available. Check out the kitchen section at a place like the Container Store, Amazon, or IKEA and look for storage that fits your home’s needs.</li>
<li>If you have a small kitchen, there are ways to increase floor space. Use a pull-out cutting board under the counter for an as-needed workspace. Install fold-down counters that can be lifted up against the wall when you don’t need them. The internet is full of DIY guides for these kinds of kitchen makeovers.</li>
<li>Use storage solutions not just in cabinets, but in your fridge and freezer, too. Lazy susans and stackable bins are great options. Flatten food before freezing it so it becomes stackable, with dividers to make stacking even easier. Remove bulky excess packaging from food to create more space in the fridge. Reposition the shelves as needed. And save an old egg carton so you can store condiments upside upside down without them toppling over every time you open the fridge door.</li>
<li>Completely empty your pantry to organize it. This way, you can go through items one-by-one, discarding anything that’s expired and placing like items with like so everything’s easy to find.</li>
<li>Cramped for cabinet space? Hang pots and pans and other cookware from a ceiling rack. Not enough kitchen drawers? Hang utensils and measuring cups on hooks on a cabinet door. An organized kitchen can even create more storage space by having high shelves for storage bins.</li>
<li>For countertop food storage, invest in attractive food storage containers. Mason jars work great for this. Clear canisters are great because you can see what’s inside (and when you’re running low on dry goods).</li>
<li>A dish rack doesn’t need to take up counter space in a small space. Look for a drying rack that sets up over your kitchen sink just when you need it.</li>
<li>Organize kitchen cords like you would for any electronics. Cords from countertop appliances can take up a lot of space, so use zip ties or velcro bands to keep them neat and out of the way.</li>
<li>Take advantage of dead space for extra storage. Add shelving to the side of a kitchen island. Hang utensils on a wall like decor in place of a backsplash. Use a rack on the back of a door to add storage for baking sheets, pantry storage items or cleaning supplies.</li>
<li>Use the outside of the fridge. Many kitchen items, like spice dispensers, potholders, cutlery, kitchen tools,  or utensils, can be stuck to the side or front of the fridge with magnets, clearing up cabinet or drawer space. Even a paper towel holder can be stuck to the fridge with magnets so it doesn’t take up counter space. The fridge is also a great place for a chalkboard for schedules, shopping lists, or meal planning.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>LEARN MORE:</strong> Learn how to begin <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/organize-your-kitchen-5-simple-steps-to-get-started/">Organizing Your Kitchen in 5 Simple Steps</a> with this guide.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Kitchen_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Kitchen Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<div id="living"></div>
<h2>Living Room Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6609 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/03-Living-Room.png" alt="Living Room Organization" width="1793" height="387" /><br />
Your living room is the space where your family spends time together and the most likely place for you to entertain guests. Unfortunately, it’s also the place that catches the most daily clutter. You don’t need professional organizers to have a clean and tidy living room. You just need the right room organization ideas.</p>
<h3>Common problems with living room organization</h3>
<ul>
<li>For larger households, this shared space can end up being a nesting ground for clutter.</li>
<li>Coffee tables or center pieces can accumulate dirt, stains, and messes if not maintained.</li>
<li>Depending on your day, coming home to a messy living room might just add to your stresses.</li>
<li>Your living room area may be lacking functionality and room design.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Living room organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Digitize media. We no longer need cumbersome shelves packed with VHS tapes and DVDs. Those can all be stored on a single hard drive, freeing up living room space.</li>
<li>Try not to let the living room become a dumping ground for your family’s clutter. It’s tempting, since this is likely where your family gathers. But dedicate time daily to pick up any items that have collected in the living room so it doesn’t get cluttered again. Having an organized “drop zone” in the entryway can help with this.</li>
<li>Choose storage solutions that match your home decor. This could be a shelving unit, mounted wall storage, or baskets or bins that match the decor in the room. Giving everything a unified look that matches the design style and color scheme will allow you to maximize storage space without making the living room look messy.</li>
<li>Use furniture that can also serve as as storage to help the living room look extra tidy, or help clean up a small living room. Think a cute bar cart, storage ottomans, cabinets or drawers built into furniture pieces, repurposing an armoire as a TV stand, or even bins to slide under the couch out of sight.</li>
<li>Declutter by removing everything from the floor, surfaces, cabinets, drawers, shelves, and other areas. Get rid of anything you don’t want or need.</li>
<li>Put away anything that doesn’t belong in the living room.</li>
<li>Consider what kinds of items are going to live in the living room (books, knick-knacks, electronics, remotes,board games, toys, etc.) and what storage solutions will work best for them. You may want shelving, a bookcase, storage boxes and bins, decorative baskets, hidden storage furniture, something else, or all of the above. You can even use different types of shelves and living room furniture to <a href="https://livingwithlady.com/2019/02/our-diy-built-ins-our-best-tips-and-tricks-to-build-your-own.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">leverage built-in storage hacks</a> for added space.</li>
<li>Put away everything you want to keep in the living room.</li>
<li>Organize electronics by putting like items together. For example, if you have any gaming consoles, keep those, their cords, their games, and any accessories in one area together. As you’re organizing electronics, organize cords too by tying them up with zip ties or velcro straps. Cable management sleeves or hooks might also be solutions that work for your electronics setup.</li>
<li>Decide early on what will live on flat surfaces (shelves, side tables, end tables, console tables, the TV stand, etc.), and then adopt a policy of not allowing clutter to pile up in those areas. It can help to keep decorative objects there, like framed photos, flower vases, or magazines. Then, there’s no room for extra items and they stay clutter-free.</li>
<li>Uses lidded boxes, folders, magazine racks, or file drawers to organize and store paper clutter.</li>
<li>Need storage ideas for small items, like remote controls? Use a decorative basket, or a box with a lid if you want them out of sight.</li>
<li>Keep toys organized in one area. If you have kids, it probably isn’t possible to have a toy-free living room, especially if you don’t have a dedicated playroom. So instead, designate one area (say, a bookshelf) for toys. Invest in lots of different size boxes, baskets, or bins that look nice and will keep toys organized and out of sight. Encourage kids to keep their toys in the area with a colorful rug just for playing on, or a divider separating their play area from the rest of the family room.</li>
<li>Decide on a trash system. Living rooms will accumulate trash, so it’s a good organization tip to have a decorative trash can in the room. If you’re going to use it for food waste, make sure it has a secure lid that can block odors.</li>
<li>Look for storage in areas that are under-utilized. For example, put a table or shelves in the space behind the couch, or use shelves or boxes under your coffee table to add more storage to the room, if needed.</li>
<li>Storage doesn’t have to take up floor space or living space, especially if your living room is a small space. Attach storage baskets or storage bins to walls. Create an entertainment center out of floating shelves. Build extra storage with shelving up high near the ceiling.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our<a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Living-Room_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Living Room Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<div id="bathroom"></div>
<h2>Bathroom Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6610 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/04-Bathroom.png" alt="Bathroom Organization" width="1793" height="386" /><br />
Your bathroom can be a busy place, especially in larger households. Having an organization plan in place will help your household stay on top of the daily bathroom routines and the messes they naturally attract.</p>
<h3>Common problems with bathroom organization</h3>
<ul>
<li>Bathrooms can be a breeding ground for bacteria, hair, soap scum, makeup, and lots of other toiletry residue.</li>
<li>Things like makeup and skincare samples, or small toiletry bottles from hotels can pile up quickly, and be honest — are you ever <i>really</i> going to use them? Getting in the habit of refusing free items you don’t need is a great general tip for avoiding clutter.</li>
<li>Smaller bathrooms provide very limited space if you don&#8217;t have an organization system in place.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Bathroom organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Throw away empties right away. Don&#8217;t let empty bottles of shampoo, conditioner, soaps, lotions, and other products pile up in the bathroom. When something runs out, recycle or trash the container right away.</li>
<li>Look for unexpected space for a bathroom shelf. The wall above the toilet, above the counter, in a corner — even the back of the bathroom door are all places you might be able to fit some small shelves to add storage.</li>
<li>Get creative with the space you have, even if it’s a small bathroom. Bathrooms can be configured in so many different ways, and you should choose storage solutions that work for your space and lifestyle. For example, don’t feel like a cumbersome towel bar is your only option — wall hooks, a small towel rack in a hidden spot, or a basket might work better in your space.</li>
<li>Declutter by removing everything from the floor, surfaces, cabinets, drawers, shelves, and other areas. Get rid of anything you don’t want or need.</li>
<li>Put away anything that doesn’t belong in the bathroom.</li>
<li>If you have a large family, adopt a system like color-coding personal belongings to keep everything organized. Toothbrushes, towels, and even plastic bins for personal hygiene items, hair products, and makeup, can be easily found in each family member’s chosen color on Amazon, the Dollar Store, or at another seller.</li>
<li>Avoid storing products on the edge of the tub or shower floor. Instead, choose an organization solution that works for your setup and storage needs: A shower caddy, a shower curtain with storage pockets, plastic bins, shelves, and soap dishes are all good options. As a bonus, not having to navigate bottles on the edge ups the tub’s accessibility.</li>
<li>Get creative with extra storage ideas if you need it. Some ideas to consider: Cabinets or shelving over the toilet, storage attached to the backs of cabinet doors, a wall mounted holder for toilet paper, storage baskets on shelves or the floor, magnetic sheets or strips for holding small items, and bathroom organizers for the medicine cabinet to make it a more practical storage space. The internet is full of DIY projects for creating bathroom storage in even a small space.</li>
<li>Use small bins, baskets, dividers, or drawer organizers to create separate spaces in drawers where you can organize small items.</li>
<li>Tiered shelving can help maximize storage space in the shower, on the counter, or in a bathroom cabinet. Acrylic drawers or cabinet organizers are great for the kinds of items you need to store in the bathroom.</li>
<li>Spice racks aren’t just for the kitchen. They can be used in the bathroom to organize small items or makeup.</li>
<li>Organize the bathroom vanity or countertop with tools like a lazy susan to keep products within reach, or cute containers like mason jars for storing small items like cotton swabs, cotton balls, toothbrushes, and toothpaste.</li>
<li>Keep hair tools and makeup off the countertop by creating dedicated spaces for them. A decorative, heat-safe tray can hold hot styling tools out of the way on a shelf. A cabinet door caddy can hold a hair dryer and other tools. Clear canisters can be used to store small accessories and makeup.</li>
<li>Take full advantage of under-the-bathroom sink space by adding plastic drawers or expandable shelving units. This is a great place for cleaning supplies, extra toiletries, and anything you’d like to store in the bathroom out of sight.</li>
<li>As you put things away in the bathroom, put like items with like. That means storing cleaning products in one place together, medical supplies all in the same area, etc. This will make everything easier to find.</li>
<li>If your home doesn’t have a laundry room, the bathroom can be a good place for a hamper — or two, so you can sort your laundry as you put it away.</li>
<li>The same goes for a linen closet. If you have one, see our section on closet organization. If you don’t have one, create a linen storage area in the bathroom with shelving, baskets, or a cabinet.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Bathrooms_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Bathroom Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<div id="bedroom"></div>
<h2>Bedroom Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6611 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/05-Bedroom.png" alt="Bedroom Organization" width="1793" height="386" /><br />
No bedroom should ever double as a junk room (or look like one). Use these bedroom organization ideas to coordinate possessions and streamline the bedrooms in your home for less stressful mornings and better sleep at night. Start with the master bedroom, and later, we’ll cover organizing tips for kids’ rooms, too.</p>
<h3>Common problems with bedroom organization</h3>
<ul>
<li>closed doors and lots of possessions can make both adult and child bedrooms a disaster.</li>
<li>Smaller bedroom spaces can prove to be more difficult for organizing to easily access everything you keep in your bedroom.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Bedroom organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Consider your bedroom a sanctuary. It should be a peaceful place for unwinding and sleeping, so take extra care to declutter frequently and avoid leaving items in the bedroom that don’t belong there.</li>
<li>Limit the nightstand to essentials. Instead of a pile of books, just keep the one you’re reading. Don’t let water glasses, medication bottles, or any other unnecessary clutter pile up there.</li>
<li>Many bedroom items are attractive enough to “store” on display. If you have a large collection of hats or scarves, hang them on the walls instead of taking up drawer or closet space.</li>
<li>Take advantage of opportunities for hidden storage ideas. Get nightstands with drawers. Invest in a large dresser. Use bins for under-bed storage. You can even put a storage ottoman at the foot of the bed to create more hidden storage for items you want to put away out of view.</li>
<li>Declutter by removing everything from the floor, surfaces, cabinets, drawers, shelves, and other areas. Get rid of anything you don’t want or need.</li>
<li>Put away anything that doesn’t belong in the bedroom.</li>
<li>Baskets are an excellent way to create homes for all the items you want to keep in the bedroom. They look great, and provide excellent storage for clothing, shoes, linens, blankets, toys, and more. Amazon and IKEA have tons of options for attractive storage baskets to match any bedroom decor.</li>
<li>When looking for bedroom storage, don’t forget to look up. Floating shelves near the ceiling can be a perfect place to store books, boxes of paper clutter, plants, and more.</li>
<li>If you need more storage space that doesn’t take up floor space, consider a headboard with built-in shelving. This is a great option for a small space — the headboard shelves can replace nightstands.</li>
<li>Another easy way to add extra storage in a small bedroom is to use a small bookcase or dresser in place of a bedside table.</li>
<li>While a full-length mirror is a bedroom essential, try turning it into an extra organization tool by building in a compartment for jewelry, makeup, or accessories.</li>
<li>Take advantage of space in the corners of the room (even above furniture pieces) with floating corner shelves.</li>
<li>Get creative with shoe storage, using wall shelves, a shoe organizer, a shoe caddy, a repurposed bookshelf or cabinet, or a <a href="https://theownerbuildernetwork.co/easy-diy-projects/diy-lazy-susan-shoe-storage/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">DIY lazy Susan</a>for a creative shoe rack.</li>
<li>Keep dresser drawers organized and clutter-free by rolling clothes instead of folding them, or using honeycomb organizers and dividers to keep everything neat and visible inside.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Bedrooms_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Bedroom Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<h3>Kids’ bedroom organization solutions</h3>
<p>Kids’ rooms have their own entire set of organization needs. If you have kids, use these tips to give their rooms the makeover they need to stay neat and tidy.</p>
<ul>
<li>The fastest way to make a bedroom look more organized is by neatly making the bed every day. Choose bedding that will make it easy for your kids to make their beds themselves.</li>
<li>Furniture that doubles as storage (benches, ottomans, or chests with a cushion on top) are perfect for bedroom toy storage, especially if you don’t have a separate playroom.</li>
<li>Created a dedicated area for crafts and homework. A small desk with a few drawers (don’t forget the drawer organizers!) should be perfect for creating a workspace and a place to stash pens and pencil, homework folders, and art supplies.</li>
<li>Laundry hampers can be a great storage solution for stuffed animals. If you’d rather have them off the floor, a hammock hung up in a corner is also a clever (and decorative) way to store them.</li>
<li>Create toy storage on the walls, using hangers, hooks, shelves, and baskets or bins that are screwed to the wall. This is especially useful for small items and toys.</li>
<li>If you have trouble finding places for all your kids’ toys to live, adopt a “one in, one out” policy — any time they get a new toy, they need to choose an old one to give away.</li>
</ul>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Kids-Bedrooms_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Kids&#8217; Bedroom Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<div id="closet"></div>
<h2>Closet Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6612 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/06-Closets.png" alt="Closet Organization" width="1793" height="387" /></p>
<p>Wondering how the closet fits into your bedroom organization strategy? The closet may be part of the bedroom, but it requires its own system, and that’s why closets get their own section and organization tips. If you’ve found yourself wistfully following bloggers’ DIY closet projects and makeovers, we can help. Here’s how to make the most of your closet space with storage ideas and organization tips that will give you extra storage and functionality.</p>
<h3>Common problems with closet organization</h3>
<ul>
<li>Closets live behind closed doors, which means they can easily become messy, cluttered, and disorganized.</li>
<li>Smaller sized closets are even more prone to accumulating clutter and becoming disorganized more than larger closet spaces.</li>
<li>If you have <i>a lot</i> of clothes that you never wear anymore, closets can become congested with clothing that&#8217;s out of season, meant for rare occassions, or articles of clothing that you no longer wear anymore.</li>
<li>The 80/20 rule: We tend to spend 80 percent of our time wearing just 20 percent of our clothes. Keep that rule in mind as you try to limit your closet to essentials, and items you actually love, wear, and use.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Closet organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Create a system for knowing which clothes you don’t wear, and getting rid of them frequently. One good way to do this is to turn all your hangers backward once a year, and once you wear something, put the hanger back the right way. At the end of the year, whichever hangers are still backward have clothes you can probably donate, recycle, or throw away.</li>
<li>Design and customize your closet organization system with drawers, closet shelves, hanging rods at various heights, clothing racks, cubbies, hanging organizers, drawer organizers, different kinds of clothes hangers, storage boxes, freestanding items, and more. <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/12-closet-organizing-ideas/" target="_blank">Closet organization ideas</a> and possibilities are virtually endless. Strive to create a system that fits your needs and keeps your belongings organized.</li>
<li>Use vacuum seal bags. These are a game changer. Use them for bulky items that take up a lot of shelf or drawer space and don’t need to be used frequently: Comforters and duvets, extra pillows, sweaters and coats during warm months, etc., especially if you don’t have a separate linen closet.</li>
<li>Remove everything from the closet. Sort it by things you’ll keep, things you’ll donate, things you’ll sell, things you’ll recycle, and things you’ll throw away.</li>
<li>It’s entirely possible to just buy a built-in closet organizer or closet system that comes pre-built with a combination of hanging closet rods, hanging space, shelving, shoe racks, and other storage space. It’s even possible to have a custom closet system built for anything from a small closet to a walk in closet. Amazon often has great deals on these kinds of systems. If you don’t have the budget for that, though, don’t worry — there are still plenty of closet organization ideas that can help you.</li>
<li>If you don’t want to shell out for a Closetmaid system, get creative with your closet system. In addition to shelves and rods, try using things like file dividers to store bags and clutches, shower rings to hang scarves or purses, clothespins, magnets, and more. Modular storage solutions are great for an organized closet. Customize and DIY your storage solutions to fit what you need for the things you have.</li>
<li>As you organize your closet, make sure you have easy access to items you use most often. High shelves and deep drawers are for items you don’t need as often.</li>
<li>Use different types of hangers for hanging clothes and to maximize space. Pants hangers take advantage of vertical space, and can be used for any kind of garment. Hangers that hold multiple items can also be a good use of extra space.</li>
<li>Easily create non-slip hangers by wrapping pipe cleaners around plastic hangers. No more tank tops or silky garments falling onto the floor.</li>
<li>Use hanging organizers if that makes more sense for your needs than having shelving units.</li>
<li>Pegboards are great organization tools anywhere in your home, but they’re especially useful in the closet. Take advantage of wall space and arrange the pegs to create jewelry organizers or storage for any kind of accessory. Pegboards can even be built near the floor for shoe storage.</li>
<li>Stacking items on shelving is a good way to use vertical space in your closet – until the stacks start falling over. Use vertical shelf dividers to make space to stack things like pants and sweaters. Or use stackable acrylic drawers to organize small items in your closet.</li>
</ul>
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<td width="624"><strong>LEARN MORE:</strong> We&#8217;ll show you <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-organize-your-closet-complete-guide/">How to Organize Your Closet</a> with this guide.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Closets_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Closet Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<div id="office"></div>
<h2>Home Office Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6613 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/07-Home-Office.png" alt="Home Office Organization" width="1793" height="386" /><br />
Especially for those that conduct business at home or frequently work remotely, the home office is a place where you need to be productive. Having a clutter-free and well organized office space can help you stay productive and enable you to do your best work.</p>
<h3>Common problems with home office organization</h3>
<ul>
<li>Paper clutter is one of the most common problems in an office space.</li>
<li>Cord management can quickly turn into a snake pit, which can sometimes even be hazardous.</li>
<li>Desk areas can sometimes become home for more decorations and clutter than actual items needed for day-to-day work activity.</li>
<li>Books can pile up and congest an office area if left neglected or not properly stored.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Home office organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Create a filing system for papers. Stay ahead of paper clutter by investing in boxes, bins, or even a file cabinet to keep it all organized.</li>
<li>Pay attention to cord management in your office. Use a desk with a hole for organizing cords, or use cord wrappers, velcro straps, or hooks that hold cords in place, out of your way.</li>
<li>Avoid letting your desk drawer become a catch-all. Use drawer organizers or a desk organizer to give everything a home, and resist the temptation to toss things like random office supplies in the drawer when they don’t have another home.</li>
<li>If you need a workspace, but need to share the room with a den, guest bedroom, playroom, or something else, using a bookshelf or cubby unit as a divider can create a quiet nook for getting work done. As a bonus, it will come with lots of storage.</li>
<li>Declutter by removing everything from the floor, surfaces, cabinets, drawers, shelves, and other areas. Get rid of anything you don’t want or need.</li>
<li>Put away anything that doesn’t belong in the office.</li>
<li>Simple office storage solutions can be as easy as getting a filing cabinet or a bookcase to create storage outside of your office desk. Make everything look nice by choosing a color scheme for all your home office furniture.</li>
<li>Sort paper items based on what you need to file, what you need to address, and what can be recycled. If you have paper records taking up a lot of space, consider scanning them so you can keep digital copies on a hard drive, instead.</li>
<li>Organize drawers with drawer organizers, dividers and bins as you put things away. Small items like paper clips, binder clips, sticky notes, and more can be stored in small jars in your drawer, or kept organized with drawer dividers. Only use the office to store things you need for work.</li>
<li>Take advantage of all the wall space in your work area (and free up desk space in the process). Put up shelving. Use a whiteboard, corkboard or pegboard to organize office essentials. Attach cubbies to the wall.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>LEARN MORE:</strong> Check out these <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/10-office-organization-ideas/" target="_blank">10 Office Organization Ideas</a> that will inspire and help you get started.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Home-Office__Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank"><u>Home Office Organization Checklist</u></a>.</p>
<div id="garage"></div>
<h2>Garage Organization</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6614 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/08-Garage.png" alt="Garage Organization" width="1793" height="386" /><br />
Once the whole house is organized, it’s time to tackle your final challenge: The garage. Organizing a garage presents unique challenges, since many people use almost the entire space for storage. There’s a real need for organization solutions in any garage.</p>
<p>The garage needs to be home for everything from the lawn mower to tool storage to bike storage, which can be a challenge. Here’s how to get started with some of our favorite storage solutions and garage organization ideas to makeover your space from disaster to organized garage.</p>
<h3>Common problems with garage storage</h3>
<ul>
<li>It’s easy to place things in the garage if there’s nowhere else for them to live, letting them hide behind the garage door, but doing this creates a mish mash of clutter in this space.</li>
<li>Garages are often a place in many homes where an accumulation of things over years, sometimes even decades, begin to overtake the space. Sometimes to the point where parking the car inside the garage is impossible.</li>
<li>Holiday decorations year after year can begin to pile up, which can leave them prone to gathering dust or damage if not stored properly.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Garage storage and organization solutions</h3>
<ul>
<li>Don’t let the garage become your home’s ultimate, catch-all drop zone. If you can’t find a home for something <em><i>anywhere</i></em> in your house, don’t just stick it in the garage — consider whether you really need it.</li>
<li>When decluttering the garage, start by taking <em><i>everything</i></em> out. Yes, it’s a pain. But doing so makes you individually confront each and every item before you can put it back, and you’ll likely get rid of a lot more things you don’t want or need.</li>
<li>Keep like items with like in the garage. For example, create an area for tools, an area for toys, and an area for sporting equipment. This will provide easy access to stored items and make everything easier to find.</li>
<li>Invest in specific garage storage systems, like thick, heavy-duty storage bins, like Rubbermaid. The garage isn’t quite as safe against pests, weather, and other dangers, so make sure your belongings are well protected.</li>
<li>Take everything out of the garage. Declutter by deciding what to keep, and what to sell, donate, recycle, and throw away.</li>
<li>Before putting the items you’re keeping back in the garage, organize them into piles so similar items are together. For example, a pile for tools and tool holders, a pile for sports equipment, and a pile for yard tools.</li>
<li>Before putting things away, take this chance to clean the garage floor.</li>
<li>Use different types of shelves depending on your needs, and create a DIY storage system that works for your space. Wall mounted shelves can do above where you park your car. If you have the floor space, free-standing shelving units or a workbench can provide lots of storage.</li>
<li>Take advantage of garage wall space. A pegboard, garage cabinets, storage rack, hangers, and more can create out-of-the-way storage for garden tools, power tools, sports gear, cleaning supplies, totes, plastic bins, and whatever else you need to store in the garage. Storage cabinets can be used to hide away everything from extension cords to tool racks. And garage shelves can double as storage and a workspace if needed.</li>
<li>For large, bulky items, look up. The garage, with all its vertical space, is made for overhead storage. Bike racks can be mounted on the walls or ceiling. And shelving units can be attached to the garage ceiling to create out-of-the way storage for items you don’t need very often.</li>
</ul>
<table style="background-color: #fff8e9;">
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width="624"><strong>LEARN MORE:</strong> Get inspired with these <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/garage-storage-ideas/" target="_blank">Garage Storage Ideas</a> that showcase a variety of ways to organize and store your items in your garage.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p><strong>Need a checklist?</strong> Download our <a href="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Garage_Home-Organization-Checklist-Neighbor.pdf" target="_blank">Garage Organization Checklist</a>.</p>
<p>Your organized home leads to more efficient cleaning, streamlined mornings, and lowered stress. If you’re looking for additional ways to improve your living or storage space after you complete this house organization guide, consider tackling any other rooms in your house that aren’t on this list — or even the attic or basement. Taking the home organization tips from your home to your office can increase work productivity, too.</p>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/home-organization-guide/">Ultimate Guide to Home Organization</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Best Packing Tape for Moving</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Thu, 29 Oct 2020 19:00:35 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to store]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving supplies]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6566</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>When you&#8217;re preparing to move to a new home, you probably have a lengthy moving checklist that can include convincing friends to help you move, finding moving boxes, buying bubble wrap and hiring professional movers. You may be thinking that moving tape is the least of your worries and that you can simply pick up any kind [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/">Best Packing Tape for Moving</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>When you&#8217;re preparing to move to a new home, you probably have a lengthy <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">moving checklist</a> that can include convincing friends to help you move, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">finding moving boxes</a>, buying bubble wrap and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">hiring professional movers</a>.</p>
<p>You may be thinking that moving tape is the least of your worries and that you can simply pick up any kind from the store. However, choosing the wrong kind of moving and packing tape can lead to breakage, lost possessions and even injuries.</p>
<h2>What&#8217;s the Best Tape for Moving?</h2>
<p><strong>For quick, short moves, shipping tape may be the best tape for packing and moving.</strong> Traditionally identified by being clear and making loud noises when used, it&#8217;s a great option if boxes won&#8217;t be stored for long periods or in extremely hot or cold temperatures.</p>
<p>If the boxes could be prone to extreme temperatures or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">stay in storage</a> for long periods, opt for a more robust storage tape.</p>
<p>If boxes are particularly heavy, you can use filament tape which contains fiberglass strands to add extra strength or simply apply extra strands of regular shipping tape to provide additional support to the moving box.</p>
<p>There&#8217;s much more to choosing the best tape for packing and moving. To learn more about choosing the right tape for packing, what tapes to avoid, how to tape boxes like a pro and more, keep reading!</p>
<div class="embed-container"><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed//eYoEfxr50vg" width="300" height="150" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div>
<h2></h2>
<h2>7 Important Properties of Packing Tape and Moving Tape</h2>
<p>You may be thinking any tape that covers the gap will work to keep your possessions in place. That&#8217;s not necessarily the case. Moving boxes change hands several times, get jostled around a lot, and often face substantial temperature changes. So you probably shouldn&#8217;t just grab the first roll of tape with a dispenser you see. Consider these important factors when you choose the packing tape for your move.</p>
<h3>1. Adhesion (Sticking Power)</h3>
<p>Yes, most tape sticks, but not all of it sticks well to cardboard. How well your tape sticks depends on the tape&#8217;s grade (a combination of stickiness and strength) and the kind of adhesive it contains. The most common types of adhesives are hot melt adhesive and acrylic adhesive. Acrylic tapes are typically designed for longer use.</p>
<h3>2. Strength</h3>
<p>Tapes that tear easily are easy to use but usually not very strong. It&#8217;s important to have tape that doesn&#8217;t tear when you move the box. Additionally, the strength of your tape can actually help reinforce your moving boxes. While you don&#8217;t always need heavy-duty shipping/packing tape, stronger grades of tape are useful for some items.</p>
<h3>3. Ease of Use</h3>
<p>Moving is a chaotic time. Anything that helps you save time during the packing process can be helpful. Some of the stickiest tapes can be difficult to pull from a roll, making you spend precious extra time sealing each box.</p>
<h3>4. Ability to Withstand Temperatures</h3>
<p>You may be packing in a temperature-controlled environment, but your boxes won&#8217;t be staying at the same temperature during the move. Consider whether your boxes will be spending time in a humid storage space or how cold the moving truck might be during a winter move.</p>
<h3>5. Width</h3>
<p>Tape that barely covers the seam of your boxes won&#8217;t stay in space while you lift and carry the boxes. The width of your tape can help you avoid using multiple layers and make a considerable difference in strength and how well it sticks. Most quality tapes used to seal boxes are 2-3 inches wide.</p>
<h3>6. Cost</h3>
<p>While getting the cheapest tape available can leave you with boxes that don&#8217;t stay sealed, you don&#8217;t necessarily want to spring for the most expensive option you can find. Costly tape means you won&#8217;t be able to afford as much. You might be tempted to skimp on double layers or the best length for your boxes.</p>
<h3>7. Brand</h3>
<p>The brand of tape you choose isn&#8217;t nearly as important as how well it works. Still, trusted brands are typically successful because they get the job done. For instance, <a href="https://www.duckbrand.com/products" target="_blank">Duck brand tape</a> is well-known and comes in a variety of types and styles. Other popular tape brands include <a href="https://www.scotchbrand.com/3M/en_US/scotch-brand/tips-uses/packing-for-a-move/" target="_blank">Scotch</a>, Uline, and 3M. If you pick up your tape from a storage facility or moving company, you may be interested in a brand specifically designed for your needs like U-Haul or Tape King.</p>
<h2><img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-6637" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/pexels-ketut-subiyanto-4246120.jpg" alt="Packing tape when moving" width="1280" height="853" />How to Choose the Right Packing Tape and Moving Tape</h2>
<p>The type of tape you&#8217;ll use for packing depends on your moving needs. Since you&#8217;re planning to seal boxes, begin by choosing tape labeled for moving or storage. These choices will make it easier to narrow your selection to find exactly what you need to keep your possessions safe, whether you&#8217;re moving across the neighborhood or putting your belongings in storage. Other concerns that may factor into your tape choice include:</p>
<h3>How Long Boxes Remain Sealed</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re facing a one-day move, most types of hot-melt adhesive packing tape will be sufficient to keep your possessions where they belong. If your boxes will be spending a considerable amount of time in storage, you&#8217;ll need tape designed to last and combat the effects of temperature change and humidity.</p>
<h3>Extreme Temperatures</h3>
<p>Are you moving during winter? Will your boxes will be exposed to moisture or excessive humidity? You may want to consider acrylic tapes that can withstand temperature changes.</p>
<h3>What You&#8217;re Packing</h3>
<p>Box types tend to vary with the items you&#8217;re moving. You can seal boxes that weigh under 30 pounds with lighter weight tape. While you can expect most brands of moving tape to be sufficient for the bulk of your moving boxes, you may want to consider heavy-duty types like filament tape or gummed paper tape for the boxes containing your heaviest possessions.</p>
<h3>Moving Conditions</h3>
<p>You&#8217;re not likely to be handling every single box yourself. Consider whether you&#8217;re working with a professional moving company or if you&#8217;re doing a DIY move with a convoy of pick-up trucks. Will your possessions be exposed to a considerable amount of rough handling or jostling in transit? If so, you might consider a stronger tape that helps reinforce the strength of your moving boxes.</p>
<h2>What&#8217;s the Difference Between Moving Tape and Storage Tape?</h2>
<p>Moving tape and storage tape can both seal boxes, but they don&#8217;t last the same amount of time.</p>
<p>When you&#8217;re packing boxes, moving and storage seem a lot like the same thing. Yet, storage typically means your belongings will spend considerably more time packed away. Moving and storage tape look virtually the same (often simply referred to a clear packing tape). But they have different qualities that make them perfect for a specific job.</p>
<p>Moving tape uses a hot-melt adhesive designed to keep boxes sealed through the handling and jostling related to moving. Storage tape uses an acrylic adhesive that can withstand heat, cold, and humidity for up to 10 years. Some quality moving tapes can last up to two years. But storage tape is typically a safer bet for boxes going in storage.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Moving Tape Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you&#8217;ve already removed the label and don&#8217;t know whether you&#8217;re using storage or moving tape, listen to the sound it makes as it&#8217;s peeled from the roll. Moving tape makes a ripping, crackly sound as it releases from the roll. Storage tape unrolls smoothly and quietly.</p></blockquote>
<h2>Types of Moving Tape</h2>
<p>Your moving tape choices aren&#8217;t limited to clear, brown, black, or silver. It&#8217;s time to learn about the types of tape that work best for each moving job you&#8217;ll face. Your moving boxes might be mostly the same size and shape. But they hold different objects and typically have different weights. It&#8217;s a good idea to have a variety of different kinds of tape to take care of your moving needs. These are some of the most common types of packing tape used for moving.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Moving Tape Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>There&#8217;s no doubt you&#8217;ll use tape for sealing boxes. However, there are a variety of other uses for different types of tape during the packing process.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Shipping Tape</h3>
<p>Shipping tape seems like an obvious candidate for sealing moving boxes. It&#8217;s the sticky, clear tape that makes a loud ripping sound when it releases from the roll. With a hot melt adhesive and a typical width of 2-3 inches, shipping/packing tape is suitable to seal most cardboard boxes. Shipping tape is a great choice for any short move. When used with a tape dispenser, it&#8217;s easy to apply and removes easily as well.</p>
<h3>Storage Tape</h3>
<p>Much like shipping tape, storage tape is usually clear and 2-3 inches wide. However, storage tape is made with acrylic adhesive, which makes it longer lasting. An excellent choice for boxes that will be put in <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/">storage</a>, shipping tape can last up to 10 years in all temperatures and humidity levels.</p>
<h3>Filament Tape</h3>
<p>Sometimes called strapping tape, filament tape contains fiberglass strands to add extra strength. Heavy boxes, boxes that will likely face an excess of jostling and rough handling, or those exposed to heat and cold can benefit from the use of filament tape. Graded by weight, this heavy-duty packing tape is designed for boxes that will hold up to 100 pounds. Some tapes can even support up to 380 pounds.</p>
<h3>Brown Packing Tape</h3>
<p>While this tape has the width to easily cover box seams, it&#8217;s made of paper. Paper has the convenience of tearing easily during application, but the same convenience is a detriment during transit. Paper tape doesn&#8217;t stand up to blunt force trauma or moisture. That means it&#8217;s only useful for lightweight items during short moves.</p>
<h3>Duct Tape</h3>
<p>The tape that holds everything together must be a good choice for packing, right? Not really. In fact, duct tape is one of the worst types of tape for moving tasks. Although it&#8217;s powerful and uses a sticky adhesive, it doesn&#8217;t stick well to cardboard. Duct tape is more expensive than most packing tapes. It also leaves behind a sticky residue and is difficult to remove from practically all surfaces.</p>
<h3>Masking Tape</h3>
<p>Easy to apply and makes labeling a cinch, masking tape works great for many things. Unfortunately, sealing boxes isn&#8217;t one of them.</p>
<p>However, masking is easily removed and leaves no residue. So it can be used to hold items together and to secure bubble wrap or other packing supplies. A strip of masking tape across your boxes makes for quick and easy labeling.</p>
<h3>Gummed Paper Tape</h3>
<p>With strength and adhesive properties to spare, this tape can definitely seal your moving boxes. Sometimes called mailing tape, this is the papery tape usually found on boxes you receive from online retailers or packages you receive at store pickup. Its biggest downfall is that you have to apply water to make it stick.</p>
<p>Gummed paper tape works well in professional facilities, but it&#8217;s usually not the best type for residential moving needs. Activating the tape is a hassle, and its reinforced lines make it difficult to remove, as well. This heavy-duty sealing/packaging tape is best saved for extremely heavy boxes that have a long way to travel.</p>
<h3>Labeled Tape</h3>
<p>It goes without saying that labels are useful for the placement of moving boxes. When you get your boxes to your new home, you want to know which room to put them in. Labeled tape combines labeling and sealing into one task with color-specific tape that&#8217;s labeled for each room. You could place labels or stickers on top of your boxes. But labeling tape can be seen on all sides of the box for easy accessibility when unloading and <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">unpacking time</a> arrives.</p>
<h3>Electrical Tape</h3>
<p>Easy to apply and easy to remove, this shiny tape carries the name electrical tape for a reason. The most common type is only 3/8 inch wide, and an inability to stick to cardboard makes this tape useless for keeping boxes closed. Still, electrical tape can be used for other moving tasks like color-coding boxes or grouping cords and other items together.</p>
<h3>Cellophane Tape</h3>
<p>You may know this tape as Scotch tape. Whether you&#8217;re accustomed to the Scotch tape you use with wrapping paper or the kind of cellophane tape typically seen in offices, this weaker adhesive tape isn&#8217;t suitable for sealing cardboard boxes. Cellophane works best for moving tasks like attaching cords to their electronics or sealing bubble wrap.</p>
<h3>Washi (Craft) Tape</h3>
<p>While you won&#8217;t be sealing boxes with this skinny, lightweight tape, you can use it for other tasks during your move. Washi tape is easily affordable and found in a variety of fun colors. It can be used to color-code your boxes and group items together. A different color for each room can mean you don&#8217;t have to wonder if you&#8217;re putting those heavy boxes in the right place.</p>
<h2>The Worst Types of Tape for Sealing Moving Boxes</h2>
<p>If you&#8217;re still thinking of using whatever sticky substance you can get your hands on, you should know there are some types of tape that are best avoided. Tapes that aren&#8217;t designed to stick to cardboard or aren&#8217;t wide or strong enough could leave you with a mess on your hands. Any type of tape that is easy to break or remove with your hands can be loosened from your moving boxes during transport. While these tapes might have other uses during your move, using them to seal boxes isn&#8217;t a great idea.</p>
<ul>
<li>Duct Tape: The rubber adhesive used in duct tape means it doesn&#8217;t stick well to boxes and leaves a sticky residue on other items.</li>
<li>Masking Tape: Easy removal and simple tearing by hand make masking tape a winner for grouping things together. But it&#8217;s not strong enough to seal and reinforce moving boxes.</li>
<li>Electrical Tape: This flexible tape doesn&#8217;t adhere well to cardboard, making it useless for box sealing.</li>
<li>Cellophane Tape: This clear tape is useful for keeping tissue paper in place on delicate items and securing bubble wrap in place, but isn&#8217;t strong enough for sealing boxes.</li>
</ul>
<h2><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6571" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Using-a-moving-tape-dispenser-to-secure-boxes.jpg" alt="close-up of someone using a tape dispenser to seal a moving box" width="1254" height="836" /></h2>
<h2>Best Tape Dispensers for Sealing Moving Boxes</h2>
<p>If you&#8217;re hoping for a fast and easy packing process, using the right tape dispenser (tape gun) can make a big difference. A tape gun allows you to seal boxes quickly with one hand. It can also easily cut strong tape the exact length you need. When choosing a tape dispenser, avoid flimsy, cheap models. Even ordering all-in-one tape with dispenser products might not give you the best tool for a specific job. A tape gun that bends, doesn&#8217;t hold tape properly, or falls apart can make your job more difficult than not using one at all.</p>
<p>Look for these properties in a quality tape dispenser.</p>
<h3>Safety</h3>
<p>A packaging tape dispenser needs a sharp cutting edge to efficiently cut the tape as you seal your moving boxes. If your tape gun is flimsy, has a short handle, or is constructed poorly, your hand might be too close to the cutting edge. While you probably won&#8217;t end up with a serious injury, cuts on your hands and fingers won&#8217;t make moving day any easier.</p>
<h3>Easy Loading</h3>
<p>Most tape dispensers load from the side. However, if yours requires a difficult process to correctly line up the tape or secure the roll in place, you may find yourself skimping on tape to avoid slowing down to load the gun. To load your tape gun, you should be able to quickly push a roll of tape onto the dispenser, thread the tape end between the roller and metal gate, and secure the tape in place.</p>
<h3>Comfort</h3>
<p>The handle of your packing tape dispenser should be easy to hold. It should also be ergonomically designed and have a coating that provides a firm grip.</p>
<h3>Strength</h3>
<p>A tape dispenser that is strong and durable helps you quickly seal several boxes without a struggle. Your tape dispenser should be composed of both hard plastic and metal parts for a product that doesn&#8217;t flex or bend while you&#8217;re pulling out tape. It should also cut easily without significant effort.</p>
<h3>Quality Working Parts</h3>
<p>The main parts of your tape dispenser should be designed in a way that completes the job smoothly. When you choose a tape gun, pay attention to the roller, dispenser, brake, and handle. Your tape gun&#8217;s roller should be smooth and perfectly round, with a standard size to fit almost any kind of tape. The dispenser should be smooth and perfectly sized to the width of the tape. The brake should work on contact for an immediate stop and smooth cut.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Moving Tape Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you have a helper, purchase two tape dispensers to keep things moving quickly. Sharing can lead to slower packing and lost time.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Tape Boxes Like a Moving Pro</h2>
<p>If this is your first move, assembling boxes and taping them shut might seem like a simple concept that just takes a little practice. That&#8217;s partially true. But the way you tape your box can make a big difference in how well it stays sealed, especially on the bottom. So, what&#8217;s the best method for assembling and taping moving boxes?</p>
<p>The H-Method. This method requires you to apply tape to the vertical and horizontal seams of each box. Here’s how to do it:</p>
<ol>
<li>Begin by folding the box into shape.</li>
<li>Turn the box over, and fold in the edges (smaller edges first).</li>
<li>Tape down the long horizontal seam in the middle. Remember to allow the tape to extend over the side for extra support.</li>
<li>Making sure the flaps are close together, repeat the horizontal seam taping.</li>
<li>Tape both sides of the shorter vertical seams for extra support.</li>
<li>Fill your box and use the appropriate packing materials to ensure nothing&#8217;s moving around.</li>
<li>Repeat the H-Method for the top of the box.</li>
</ol>
<h2>Specialty Tapes for Specific Moving Needs</h2>
<p>Packing your possessions the right way is vital for getting them safely to your new home. Cardboard boxes have limits on the amount of protection they can provide. Securing your possessions firmly in place can help you avoid damage and find things quickly when unpacking.</p>
<ul>
<li>Use masking tape, painter&#8217;s tape, or related products to form an X over glass items. It keeps glass from shattering on impact and helps prevent it from sliding around inside the packaging.</li>
<li>Use scotch tape to secure tissue or other clean white paper around delicate moving parts of items that could be easily damaged during transit.</li>
<li>Use moving tape to secure moving blankets in place and avoid slippage.</li>
<li>Switch to strips of washi tape or masking tape for labels you want to write on.</li>
<li>Use electrical tape to attach hardware or cords to the items they belong to.</li>
<li>Use masking tape to secure the lids of toiletries.</li>
<li>Keep duct tape available to repair boxes that get damaged along the way.</li>
</ul>
<p>Moving is a huge job with a lot of things to worry about. Tape is a great tool to help make the job easier. Don&#8217;t just pick up something sticky to seal your moving boxes. Choose the right variety of tapes that can help you with many packing needs.</p>
<p>The right moving tape can keep your possessions where they belong and even reinforce your boxes for a safe move. Now that you know how much you can do with tape, it&#8217;s hard to remember why you thought it wasn&#8217;t the most important item on your list!</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/best-moving-tape-packing/">Best Packing Tape for Moving</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Change of Address Checklist: The Ultimate Guide to Address Changes During a Move</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 27 Oct 2020 19:00:06 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving checklist]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6557</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>When you change your address, you have a laundry list of essential moving to-dos to take care of. Moving from one home to another is hectic. But it&#8217;s important to remember that a change of address needs to be listed on all of your important accounts and mailing lists. While you probably weren&#8217;t looking for [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist: The Ultimate Guide to Address Changes During a Move</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>When you change your address, you have a laundry <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">list of essential moving to-dos</a> to take care of. Moving from one home to another is hectic. But it&#8217;s important to remember that a change of address needs to be listed on all of your important accounts and mailing lists. While you probably weren&#8217;t looking for another task to add to your moving to-do list, making a checklist of people you should notify when you move is vital. This change of address checklist will remind you what changes to make and how to accomplish them before the move.</p>
<h2>What Do I Need for a Change of Address?</h2>
<p>Certain documents may be needed to complete your change of address with some companies and important agencies.</p>
<p>When you think of changing your address, the number of people and companies you need to contact can quickly get overwhelming. Having the right documents and information available can make the transition go smoothly. While you might not need information for everyone on the list, here are some common points of information you might need.</p>
<h3>Your New Postal Address</h3>
<p>This probably seems obvious, but a misspelled word or number out of place can completely change your address. Make sure you have the exact postal address and zip code of your new home.</p>
<h3>Account Numbers</h3>
<p>Utility companies, medical providers, and streaming services use an account number for the easiest method of identification. Having your numbers available, whether you&#8217;re on the phone, online, or at the office, can help make the change quick and painless.</p>
<h3>Passwords</h3>
<p>You can save time by changing your details online for many accounts. If you don&#8217;t have a virtual service keeping up with your passwords, it&#8217;s time to dig out the list.</p>
<h3>Phone Number</h3>
<p>In the past, having your new landline number available could be a challenge. Today, most people depend entirely on mobile phones. If you expect to change your number, you&#8217;ll want the new phone number available as soon as possible.</p>
<h3>Credit Card Number</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re establishing payment methods in a new city, you may need to have a credit card available to set up accounts.</p>
<div class='embed-container'><iframe src='https://www.youtube.com/embed//xk-YhyoZRhM' frameborder='0' allowfullscreen></iframe></div>
<h2>When Should I Change My Address?</h2>
<p>Notifying relevant agencies of your change of address will take place over the two weeks leading up to moving day and the days following the move.</p>
<p>You don&#8217;t need to wait until after you move to notify important agencies of your updated address. In fact, changing your address early is a critical step in ensuring you&#8217;ll be prepared to move into your new home. Use this list to make sure you notify the proper companies on time so your services won&#8217;t be interrupted.</p>
<h3>Two Months Before the Move</h3>
<p>While it&#8217;s not time to officially change your address, you&#8217;ll need to prepare for the events leading up to the move.</p>
<ul>
<li>Book Your Move. It&#8217;s not enough to simply have boxes on hand and be prepared for moving day. Call ahead to make sure your moving company of choice can coordinate with your schedule. Determine whether you&#8217;ll need <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=header&amp;utm_medium=headerlogo">storage facilities</a> in your new city before your arrival.</li>
<li>Make a List. Watch your mail, check your email frequently, and dig out your holiday list. The mail you receive is a good reminder of all the subscriptions and mailing lists your address is included on. Your holiday list can help you ensure all of your friends and family are aware of your new mailing address. Build a personal change of address checklist that includes government agencies, local service providers, retail stores and apps, and any other companies that send you mail.</li>
<li>Get the Details. Make sure you have the exact details of your new postal address and the correct zip code. This is also when you need to learn what documents and information you&#8217;ll need to have to fill out the physical or online moving forms.</li>
</ul>
<h3>One Month Before the Move</h3>
<ul>
<li>Gather Information. You will need account numbers, passwords, legal details, and personal details to change your address across different accounts. Gathering the information ahead of time will make change of address forms a breeze.</li>
<li>Remove Yourself From Unnecessary Mailing Lists. Receiving less mail will make your change of address easier. As you make your list, remove yourself from mailing lists and subscription services you no longer wish to receive.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Two Weeks Before the Move</h3>
<ul>
<li>Contact the United States Postal Service (USPS). Since the postal service will be forwarding your mail, this is the best place to start. It can take some time for the change to be official, so it&#8217;s important to avoid waiting until the last minute.</li>
<li>Check in With Utility Companies. You don&#8217;t want to spend your first night without heat, electricity, or running water. It&#8217;s essential to contact local utility companies before you move. If internet is essential, make sure to contact a local provider ahead of time, as well.</li>
<li>Get in Touch With Financial Institutions. Your bank and other financial institutions mail documents that include sensitive financial information. A change of address with these organizations is vital to protect yourself against risks of identity theft.</li>
</ul>
<h3>As Soon as Possible After the Move</h3>
<ul>
<li>Update Your Driver&#8217;s License or State ID. Most states require you to have your address updated on your driver&#8217;s license and registration within 30 days. Waiting until the last minute can mean you won&#8217;t get an appointment in time.</li>
<li>Keep an Eye on Forwarded Mail. As you receive forwarded mail at your new address, you&#8217;re likely to realize you&#8217;ve forgotten to update your address with a few organizations. Take care of this as you receive mail so it&#8217;s not forgotten while you&#8217;re unpacking.</li>
</ul>
<h2>Your Change of Address Checklist</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6562" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Man-changing-his-address-on-his-online-subscriptions-and-services.jpg" alt="Man changing his address on his online subscriptions and services" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>While snail mail might not be your main form of correspondence, most of your accounts, memberships, and bills have your address on file. Important documents and those with personal and financial information are often received by mail. Completing the proper changes will help you avoid confusion and potential difficulties in the future. Use this change of address checklist to make sure nothing gets left out.</p>
<h3>Post Office</h3>
<p>Your local post office is a good place to start when you begin to document your address change. The only way you can receive mail at your new address is to set up a mail forward through the U.S. Postal Service. Fill out <a href="https://moversguide.usps.com/mgo/disclaimer?referral=UMOVE" target="_blank">this simple online form</a> to get it done right away. Mail sent to your old address will be forwarded to your new home for six months to a year.</p>
<h4>How Do I Include My Family Members on Change of Address Forms?</h4>
<p>The name of everyone who is moving to a new address must be included on your USPS change of address form.</p>
<p>If everyone in your family has the same surname, everyone will be included on one form. Simply include the names of every family member who will be moving to the new residence. If there are members in your family with different surnames, you&#8217;ll need a separate form.</p>
<h4>How do I change my address for a temporary move?</h4>
<p>If you need to live at a new residence for less than a year, you can have your mail forwarded to your new address for a specific amount of time.</p>
<p>There are a variety of reasons you may be temporarily changing residences. Luckily, you can apply for a temporary address change. A temporary address change typically means six months or less. However, you will also have the option to extend the change up to 12 months. This option means your address will automatically revert to your original residence after the specified time.</p>
<h3>Government Agencies</h3>
<p>Be sure to notify these agencies of your upcoming move:</p>
<h4>Internal Revenue Service</h4>
<p>You can&#8217;t get a tax refund or stimulus check if the IRS doesn&#8217;t have your current address on file. You can <a href="https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8822.pdf" target="_blank">take care of this online</a> and even link your bank account to your tax return so you can have money owed to you by the IRS sent immediately.</p>
<h4>Social Security Administration</h4>
<p>If you receive benefits from the government (like disability, retirement, Medicare, survivor benefits, or supplemental security), it&#8217;s essential to update your address as soon as you move. Even if you receive payment through direct deposit, benefits will stop if the agency can&#8217;t contact you by mail. Fill out the <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/myaccount/change-of-address.html" target="_blank">SSA&#8217;s simple online form</a> to update your contact information.</p>
<h4>State Tax Agency</h4>
<p>To change your address with your state tax agency, go to your specific state&#8217;s website, and look for directions. Most often, you&#8217;ll be able to take care of this online.</p>
<h4>DMV</h4>
<p>Whether you&#8217;re changing states or not, the DMV typically expects you to report your change of address within 30 days of moving (even within the same city). If you&#8217;re taking a registered vehicle across state lines for the move, you&#8217;ll be required to register your vehicle in your new state, as well. Luckily you can get a lot done while at your local DMV office. Bring the right documents with you and update your address for your driver&#8217;s license, vehicle registration, voter registration, and passport.</p>
<h4>Voter Registration</h4>
<p>Election time is not when you want to figure out where to go vote. Changing your voter registration address will inform you of your voting district and polling location, so you&#8217;ll at least know you&#8217;re waiting in the right line. You can change your <a href="https://www.usa.gov/change-voter-registration" target="_blank">voter registration online</a> or when you visit the DMV.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Change of Address Checklist Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Combine tasks into one trip to take care of your address change quickly. For instance, you can accomplish a lot with one trip to your local DMV office.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Utilities</h3>
<p>Moving to a new home only to realize that it will take days to get your utilities turned on isn&#8217;t a situation anyone wants to face. Whether you&#8217;re moving down the street or across the country, make sure to check into notifying local utility companies of your new address at least a month ahead of moving day.</p>
<p>You may be able to complete your change of address online for many of these companies. If you already have an online account and are remaining in the same area, simply update your account to reflect your new billing address. A move across state lines or a transition from apartment to home will require you to cancel your current utility services and open new accounts.</p>
<p>Common utilities you can expect to change include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Gas and Electric</li>
<li>Phone, Cable, and Internet Providers</li>
<li>Water/Sewage Department</li>
<li>Garbage/Recycling Company</li>
<li>Home Security Company</li>
</ul>
<h3>Your Employer</h3>
<p>Even if you&#8217;re changing jobs, your previous employer should be notified of your new address a couple of weeks before your move. Your previous employer might need to mail important documents to you (like tax information) after you&#8217;ve been removed from the HR system. If you&#8217;ve been communicating with your new employer at your current address, it&#8217;s important to let them know about your new address and your moving date.</p>
<h3>Financial Agencies</h3>
<p>Mail theft is one of the most common ways identity theft occurs. That&#8217;s why it&#8217;s vital to ensure you notify all financial institutions of your change of address before the move.</p>
<ul>
<li>Bank: Even if you bank online, you may receive statements, debit cards, and other important financial information in the mail.</li>
<li>Credit Card Companies: Even if you use paperless billing and only shop online, your credit card and retail card providers should be notified of your change of address. You don&#8217;t want important notices, your updated card, or seasonal offers falling into the wrong hands.</li>
<li>PayPal: Payment services like PayPal, Stripe, and Venmo keep your address on file. Defaulting to your old address could lead to declined payments and products lost in shipping.</li>
<li>Your IRA/401(k) Administrator: Long-term accounts can be easy to forget. Make sure you update your address to avoid missed memos and other important information.</li>
<li>Credit Unions: It&#8217;s common to use a bank and credit union for different purposes. If you use a credit union, you need to update your address before moving day.</li>
<li>Accountant and Tax Preparer: When tax season arrives, you&#8217;ll be glad you took care of this on time. Conflicting addresses on tax forms can lead to unnecessary delays, lost refunds, and even tax audits.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Change of Address Checklist Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Order new checks when you take care of your address change to eliminate an extra step.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Loan Providers</h3>
<p>Are you paying for a car? Do you still have a mortgage on your home? Are you paying off a mountain of student loans? While the idea of leaving these responsibilities behind is tempting, it&#8217;s not a realistic decision. You&#8217;re required to let your lenders know of your move. Taking care of this task ahead of time helps ensure you don&#8217;t miss any payments and potentially damage your credit.</p>
<h3>Insurance Companies</h3>
<p>It&#8217;s easy to forget how many insurance policies you need to protect your family and possessions. Insurance coverage can be tricky in the best of situations. Don&#8217;t let a simple task leave you underinsured in your time of need. Often, a change of address can be accomplished online or over the phone with the following companies.</p>
<ul>
<li>Health Insurance, Life insurance, and Dental Insurance: A health insurance claim can be denied for something as small as a typo. So, even if you remain in the same state with coverage under the same provider, notify all insurance companies of your address change.</li>
<li>Car Insurance: Auto insurance coverage varies from state to state. Even if you remain in the same city, update your auto insurance when you update your driver&#8217;s license and registration.</li>
<li>Home Insurance or Renters Insurance: Home insurance is only useful if it&#8217;s for the right home. You&#8217;ll need to notify your home insurance provider of your new address and see if any other coverage changes apply. Whether you rent or buy your home, you may be required to provide proof that you&#8217;ve secured home or renter&#8217;s insurance.</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Change of Address Checklist Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Ask your home or rental insurance provider if your possessions are covered during transit. If not, you might want to consider mover&#8217;s insurance to protect against risks during the move.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Online Shopping Sites</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6561" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Man-receiving-packages-hed-ordered-online.jpg" alt="Man receiving packages he'd ordered online" width="1366" height="768" /></p>
<p>Online services are a part of everyday life for most people. Shopping online is likely a convenience you&#8217;ll be taking advantage of immediately after you move. If you forget to update your address information for Amazon or eBay, your purchases will go to your old address by default. Luckily, these changes are typically as simple as making an update to your account profile.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Change of Address Checklist Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Your streaming services like Netflix and Amazon Prime have your address on file, too. Make sure to update your address before the move so you can keep streaming without interruption.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Clubs and Organizations</h3>
<p>Retail clubs like Sam&#8217;s Club and Costco exist practically everywhere. Make sure you include your updated address with these organizations so you&#8217;ll be ready to stock up on supplies after the move.</p>
<h3>Apps</h3>
<p>When you&#8217;re in a hurry and Google Maps defaults to your old address, you&#8217;ll likely be routed to a long commute. Many types of convenient apps use your home address as a default. If you use these types of apps, take a moment to edit your address before the move.</p>
<ul>
<li>Map Apps: Waze, Google Maps, Apple Maps</li>
<li>Transportation Apps: Uber, Lyft</li>
<li>Smart Home Apps: TV, thermostat, lights, speakers</li>
</ul>
<blockquote>
<h4>Change of Address Checklist Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Don&#8217;t forget to change the address in your browser. Auto-fill is only convenient if the right address is associated with your name.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Magazines and Subscriptions</h3>
<p>Magazines and subscription boxes are a “set it and forget it” convenience that can be easy to overlook. While the new residents at your previous address might appreciate your Dollar Shave box or favorite monthly magazine subscriptions, take the time to enter in your new address so you receive next month’s box.</p>
<h3>Local Service Providers</h3>
<p>If you employ local providers to take care of routine services (like housecleaning or lawn care) on your property, you need to advise them of your move ahead of time. If your new address is within the service area, advise companies of your new address and when you expect to be moved in.</p>
<h3>Medical Providers</h3>
<p>Your doctor, dentist, veterinarian, and other local medical providers need to know about your change of address. Specialists that you see at least once a year like your optometrist, orthodontist, or other medical specialist need to be included on this list, as well. Appointment reminders, bills, and other important information can go unnoticed for weeks or even months when your providers don&#8217;t have your current address. Conflicting addresses can also lead to problems with payments and insurance claims.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Change of Address Checklist Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you&#8217;re moving far away, your current medical providers may be able to help with referrals in your new town.</p></blockquote>
<h3>Friends and Family</h3>
<p>Your immediate family and closest friends are likely aware of your changing address, and they might even be helping with the details of your move. Still, your circle of relatives and acquaintances goes far beyond those you see on a regular basis, and they should have a spot on your change of address checklist. Luckily, today&#8217;s technology makes notifying your friends and family of your move as simple as sending out a mass email. If you&#8217;re worried about accidentally snubbing loved ones, use your contact list or holiday list to make sure everyone gets the memo.</p>
<h2>5 Tips to Make Changing your Address Easier</h2>
<p>Changing your address across all of your accounts can be a cumbersome job, but there are ways to make it easier. Organization is key, so take the time to make a plan and follow it carefully. Filling out address forms in small batches can help you avoid fatigue. Use these tips to make finishing up your change of address checklist the smoothest part of your move.</p>
<ol>
<li>Create a change of address checklist.</li>
<li>Ensure you have the right address.</li>
<li>Gather information before filling out forms.</li>
<li>Figure out what you can do online.</li>
<li>Take care of multiple things at once.</li>
</ol>
<p>Moving to a new address is a chaotic experience that can make it easy to forget essential tasks. Creating a streamlined process for your official change of address can make things go more smoothly, especially if you follow this change of address checklist. Remember to start the process early so your first few days of <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">settling in at your new residence</a> are more comfortable and enjoyable.</p>
<h2>Additional Moving Resources</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
      </a>
   </div>
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist: The Ultimate Guide to Address Changes During a Move</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Most Parents Say Remote Learning Isn’t Working For Their Kids</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/remote-learning-isnt-working/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/remote-learning-isnt-working/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 20 Oct 2020 16:00:44 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Lifestyle]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6545</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>According to a survey of parents whose kids are remote learning from home, there are numerous obstacles making this kind of school less effective than in-person classes.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/remote-learning-isnt-working/">Most Parents Say Remote Learning Isn’t Working For Their Kids</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Maria G., a mom of two elementary school kids, lives in New York, the U.S. city most battered by the coronavirus. She understands why her kids’ school remained closed this fall. But that doesn’t mean remote learning is going well for her family.</p>
<p>“It&#8217;s impossible,” she said. “I work full time from home and have two children doing remote learning all week. As I suspect it is in most homes, kids turn to mom for everything — including help with school. I feel like I&#8217;m always 10 steps behind.”</p>
<p><span id="more-6545"></span></p>
<p>Maria said she wouldn’t be comfortable having her kids back in the classroom (as parents of <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-college-packing-list/"><u>students moving to college</u></a> might feel, too), but she doesn’t know how to solve some of the challenges that come with remote learning, either.</p>
<p>“I don&#8217;t think I can solve a problem administrators are clearly trying very hard to solve,” she added. “There&#8217;s just no good solution here.”</p>
<p>In the U.S., some school districts are attempting to reopen amid the <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/survey-quarantine-brought-families-closer-together/"><u>ongoing coronavirus pandemic</u></a>. But it’s impossible to even track how many students are attending in-person classes versus learning remotely from home, because those decisions are made by local districts and they change frequently as <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/schools-are-reopening-then-quickly-closing-due-to-coronavirus-outbreaks-11597700886" target="_blank"><u>schools and districts that </u></a><a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/schools-are-reopening-then-quickly-closing-due-to-coronavirus-outbreaks-11597700886" target="_blank"><u>reopened</u></a><a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/schools-are-reopening-then-quickly-closing-due-to-coronavirus-outbreaks-11597700886"><u> close down</u></a> — temporarily or indefinitely — after experiencing their own outbreaks.</p>
<p>Amid all the uncertainty, many districts across the country made the difficult decision to stick with remote learning this year. And as we all face an unprecedented situation in which kids are attending school online and it’s largely up to their parents to guide them through it, we wondered: How’s it going so far?</p>
<p>So we surveyed American parents whose kids are learning remotely, hoping to learn more about the challenges both kids and parents face in this challenging new world.</p>
<h2>Survey: Most Parents Say Remote Learning Isn’t Working for Their Kids</h2>
<p>From our survey results, we were able to see that most parents and their kids are facing significant challenges that have come with remote learning. Here are some of the things we learned:</p>
<ul>
<li><b></b><strong><b>75 percent of parents say their kids achieve just four or fewer hours of learning per day from home.</b></strong></li>
<li>More than 55 percent of parents say their kids are achieving 50 percent or less instruction compared to in-person learning.</li>
<li>Nearly 70 percent of parents say at-home distractions are the top obstacle to remote learning.</li>
<li>1 in six parents say they <u><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/americans-outgrow-living-space/">don’t have adequate space</a> </u>or a dedicated work area for remote learning for their kids.</li>
<li>Nearly one in five say they don’t have the right materials for at-home learning.</li>
<li>55 percent of parents say having students at home has cut their ability to work remotely by 50 percent or more.</li>
<li>1 in five say they are only able to work at home 25 percent as effectively as without a student at home.</li>
</ul>
<h3>75% of Parents Say Their Kids Learn for 4 Hours Or Less Per Day From Home</h3>
<p>The first indication that remote learning isn’t working out for a lot of parents and families? 75 percent of parents in our survey say that their kids achieve just four or fewer hours of learning per day from home, <strong><b>including 22 percent of parents who say their kids only spend one to two hours per day on remote learning.</b></strong> That’s compared to the average day of in-person classes, which would include six to seven hours of instruction.</p>
<p><em><i><img class="alignnone wp-image-6547 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/01-Parents-Say-Kids-Learn-Less-From-Home.png" alt="75% of Parents Say Their Kids Learn for 4 Hours Or Less Per Day From Home" width="1789" height="1101" /></i></em></p>
<p>In addition, more than half of parents say their kids are learning less from home than they typically do in a classroom. Well over half of parents surveyed say their kids achieve 50 percent or less instruction, compared to in-person learning.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6548 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/02-Parents-Say-Kids-Achieve-Less-At-Home.png" alt="kids achieve 50 percent or less instruction, compared to in-person learning" width="1789" height="1182" /></p>
<p>That lines up with what research into the effects of the pandemic is beginning to show. Oregon-based education research nonprofit <a href="https://www.nwea.org/about/"><u>NWEA</u></a> <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/schools-coronavirus-remote-learning-lockdown-tech-11591375078" target="_blank"><u>published some preliminary research</u></a> on the effects of remote learning for the roughly 55 million K-12 students whose schools abruptly closed in the spring. They found that kids nationwide were returning to school this fall with only 70 percent of their expected reading gains, and only 50 percent of their expected math gains. For kids from minority or low-income families, kids whose families were economically impacted by the pandemic (or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/are-storage-units-a-good-investment-during-a-recession/"><u>past economic recessions</u></a>), or kids with less access to technology, learning losses were even greater.</p>
<h3>70% of Parents Say Distractions At Home Are Keeping Their Kids From Learning</h3>
<p>Domonique H. has two kids learning from home: a 13-year-old eighth grader, and an 11-year-old sixth grader. But in addition to that, Domonique runs an at-home daycare that she says creates a home environment that’s making it harder for her kids to learn.</p>
<p>“I’ve had to adjust schedules to make sure that the timing lines up with what they need. Them needing quiet space is a little bit more difficult to achieve so we’ve just needed to make adjustments to give them as quiet an environment as possible,” she explained. “I’ve had to utilize different spaces in the home more often, move around the daycare kid’s main area to reduce the noise.”</p>
<p>Domonique isn’t alone. Nearly 70 percent of parents say that distractions at home are the biggest obstacle to remote learning for their kids.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6549 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/03-Parents-Say-Distractions-at-Home-Stunt-Learning.png" alt="70% of Parents Say Distractions At Home Are Keeping Their Kids From Learning" width="1789" height="1036" /></p>
<h3>Many Families Don’t Have the Space or Resources for Remote Learning</h3>
<p>If you look closely at that chart, you’ll see that 21% of parents said the biggest obstacle for their kids was that they don’t have the space for remote learning, or they <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/study-quarantine-americans-stuff/"><u>don’t have the right materials and resources</u></a> to help their kids succeed. That’s yet another challenge families are facing as they try to navigate remote learning.</p>
<p>1 in six parents said that even if it wasn’t the biggest obstacle for their kids, they didn’t have the space in their home for remote learning.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6550 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/04-Parents-Say-They-Dont-Have-Space-for-Learning-at-Home.png" alt="Many Families Don’t Have the Space or Resources for Remote Learning" width="1789" height="990" /></p>
<p>What’s even more shocking is that nearly one in five said they don’t have the right supplies or materials to support at-home learning.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6551 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/05-Parents-Say-They-Dont-Have-the-Resources-at-Home.png" alt="1 in 5 parents say they don't have materials for remote learning" width="1789" height="1509" /></p>
<p>It’s important to note that our survey was conducted online, which may have skewed the results toward families who have computers and an internet connection at home. <a href="https://www.fcc.gov/general/explanation-broadband-deployment-data" target="_blank"><u>According to the FCC</u></a>, 25 million Americans lack stable broadband access at home, and more than 14 million have no internet access at home at all. These families are at a significant disadvantage when it comes to remote learning.</p>
<h3>Remote Learning Is Keeping Parents From Working, Too</h3>
<p>While remote learning is especially hard on the kids who have to navigate it, their parents are facing challenges, too.</p>
<p>Many offices and workplaces remain closed, and 71 percent of parents say someone in their household is currently working remotely from home while their kids are learning remotely.</p>
<p>55 percent of those parents say having students at home has reduced their ability to work remotely by 50 percent or more. And one in five says they are only able to work 25 percent as effectively as they would be without any students at home.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6552 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/06-Most-Parents-Say-Remote-Learning-Affects-Ability-to-Work.png" alt="Remote Learning Is Keeping Parents From Working, Too" width="1789" height="1270" /></p>
<h2>How Can Parents Help Make Remote Learning Easier?</h2>
<p>We don’t know how long kids will need to keep learning from home, but we do know that this survey revealed some of the ways parents can help their kids succeed. If your home has space for it, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/smart-storage-ideas/"><u>creating a quiet, dedicated area for learning</u></a> can be the first step. And <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/10-office-organization-ideas/"><u>keeping it well-organized</u></a> will give your kids an environment where they can do their best learning.</p>
<h3>Methodology</h3>
<p>We surveyed 611 American parents on Sept. 18, 2020. Respondents came from all 50 states and the District of Columbia. In order to complete the survey, the parents had to have at least one child who is engaged in remote learning from home.</p>
<p>All parents were at least 25 years old. Their ages were:</p>
<ul>
<li>27 percent ages 25-34;</li>
<li>38 percent ages 35-44;</li>
<li>19 percent ages 45-54;</li>
<li>16 percent 55 and over.</li>
</ul>
<p>54 percent of survey respondents were female, and 46 percent were male.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/remote-learning-isnt-working/">Most Parents Say Remote Learning Isn’t Working For Their Kids</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Moving to Salt Lake City, UT: A Neighbor Moving Guide [Updated]</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-to-salt-lake-city-utah/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-to-salt-lake-city-utah/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Fri, 16 Oct 2020 15:10:54 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Sarah Seright]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[City Guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Host]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Life Hacks]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Renter]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.storewithneighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=2475</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Thinking about moving to Salt Lake City? This capital city is a beautiful location with easy access to the outdoors. It&#8217;s close to a brand new international airport, has two professional sports teams, has all four seasons, and is #2 on Neighbor&#8217;s 2020 Most Neighborly Cities rankings. Moving to SLC is a great decision! However, you [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-to-salt-lake-city-utah/">Moving to Salt Lake City, UT: A Neighbor Moving Guide [Updated]</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p class="p1"><span class="s1">Thinking about moving to Salt Lake City? This capital city is a beautiful location with easy access to the outdoors. It&#8217;s close to a brand new international airport, has two professional sports teams, has all four seasons, and is #2 on <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/">Neighbor&#8217;s 2020 Most Neighborly Cities rankings</a>. Moving to SLC is a great decision!</span></p>
<p class="p1"><span class="s1">However, you don’t just move to a new city &#8211; you&#8217;re moving to a new neighborhood and community. This guide will give you everything you need to know before deciding to move to and live in Salt Lake City, Utah. Whether you are young or old, adventurous or conservative, rich or poor, don’t leave it to chance to find your next home. Relocate with confidence.</p>
<h3>Contents</h3>
<ul>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier1">Quick Facts</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier2">Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier3">Salt Lake City Schools &amp; Scores</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier4">Buying a Home in Salt Lake City</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier6">Apartments in Salt Lake City</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier7">Salt Lake City Cost of Living</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier8">Things To Do in Salt Lake City, Utah</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier9">Salt Lake City Commuting &amp; Public Transit</a></li>
<li><a href="#unique-identifier10">Cheap Self Storage in Salt Lake City</a></li>
</ul>
<div id="unique-identifier1"></div>
<h2>Quick Facts</h2>
<p><strong>Population:</strong> 200,591<br />
<strong>Median age:</strong> 32<br />
<strong>Median household income:</strong> $56,370<br />
<strong>Married population:</strong> 42.6%<br />
<strong>Altitude:</strong> 4,327 ft<br />
<strong>Average July high:</strong> 93 degrees<br />
<strong>Average January high:</strong> 37 degrees<br />
<strong>Average rainfall:</strong> 20 inches</p>
<h3>I Am Salt Lake &#8211; Podcast</h3>
<p class="aligncenter"><a href="http://www.iamsaltlake.com/" target="_blank"><img class="aligncenter wp-image-2751" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/iTunesLogoYellow_2018.jpg" alt="I am Salt Lake Podcast" width="150" height="150" /></a>What is it like to live in Salt Lake City? What makes SLC unique and cool enough to move there? To answer that, we talked to Chris Holifield, host of the <a href="http://www.iamsaltlake.com/" target="_blank">I Am Salt Lake</a> podcast. He explores the streets looking to showcase the best people, businesses, food, and events the city has to offer. We asked him for his advice on getting the most out of Utah&#8217;s capital and tips for moving to Salt Lake City.</p>
<p>Here&#8217;s our Q&amp;A with him:</p>
<h4><b>What do you like most about Salt Lake? </b></h4>
<p>Salt Lake City is an interesting city. The thing I like about Salt Lake is that it’s big enough to be a city and have that city feel yet it’s small enough that everyone knows everyone that it has that small town feel at the same time.</p>
<h4><b>What are a few of your favorite hole in the wall restaurants in Salt Lake?</b></h4>
<p><a href="https://www.charliechows.com/" target="_blank">Charlie Chows</a> (Chinese Food), <a href="http://www.chungasmexican.com/" target="_blank">Chungas</a> (Mexican Food), and <a href="https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60922-d443677-Reviews-Blue_Plate_Diner-Salt_Lake_City_Utah.html" target="_blank">Blue Plate Diner</a> (Classic American Food) are a few of our favorites.</p>
<h4><b>What are the coolest events that happen within Salt Lake every summer? </b></h4>
<p>One of my all time favorites over the summer months here in Salt Lake City is the <a href="https://www.slcfarmersmarket.org/" target="_blank">downtown farmers market</a>. It goes every Saturday from 8am-2pm from June until October at Pioneer Park right downtown Salt Lake City. I really look forward to this all year. There are tons upon tons of local produce and arts &amp; crafts vendors. I feel like I’m at a street fair or something every time I go it’s so huge.<br />
Another event that I LOVE about summer is <a href="https://craftlakecity.com/" target="_blank">Craft Lake City</a>. This year it is happening from August 10-12 right downtown at Gallivan Center. This is it’s 10th year and every year they blow me away more and more. Tons of local artists and vendors, live music, and more!</p>
<h4><b>Do you have any favorite food trucks that roam the city?</b></h4>
<p><a href="http://www.chowtruck.com/" target="_blank">Chowtruck</a> was a favorite. The reason I say was a favorite is because they actually had to recently close up shop. Chowtruck paved the path for all of the other food trucks in the city so they kind of hold a special place in my heart.<br />
Some other favorite food trucks that you should keep your eyes open for are <a href="https://www.yelp.com/biz/gerlachs-south-salt-lake">Gerlach’s</a>, <a href="https://roaminghunger.com/cupbop-korean-bbq/" target="_blank">Cup Bop</a>, <a href="http://www.waffluv.com/find-us/" target="_blank">Waffle Love</a>, and I’m not sure if this is allowed but those taco carts on the corner of 800 South are seriously some of the best.</p>
<h4><b>If someone were moving to Salt Lake City, what tips or advice would you give them to help them settle in and get to know the city?</b></h4>
<p>&#8220;I would say download and listen to every episode of our podcast, <a href="http://www.iamsaltlake.com/" target="_blank">I am Salt Lake</a>. This will allow you to get to know all of the amazing people in the city and what Salt Lake City has to offer. Another tip I would give people that have just moved here is to give it time. Be patient. Put yourself out there. Go to events, network, and volunteer. You will find your tribe, I promise you.&#8221;</p>
<div id="unique-identifier2"></div>
<h2>Neighborhoods in Salt Lake City</h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of the best parts about moving to Salt Lake City is the diversity of neighborhoods. Each has its own vibe, demographic, and will make your experience living in Salt Lake City very different (<a href="https://www.apartmentguide.com/blog/salt-lake-city-facts/" target="_blank">see 50 facts about Salt Lake neighborhoods</a>).</span></p>
<p>You can read about people&#8217;s personal experiences in Salt Lake City in Lifey&#8217;s <a href="http://lifey.org/salt-lake-city-utah" target="_blank">Guide to Salt Lake City</a>. Once you&#8217;ve lived here a while, you can <a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd0-zmpI_GG1UJNGImHDy9yaLm4vEO49Sdfr3HT4z2QDBL34g/viewform" target="_blank">contribute to Lifey&#8217;s collection</a>.</p>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>9th and 9th</strong> <span style="font-weight: 400;">– Area extending from 800 East to 1100 East and 800 South to 1300 South; 9th and 9th is often described as a mini-city within Salt Lake City.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>The Avenues</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area covering everything north of South Temple and east of State Street to city limits; the amount of wealthy people and fancy houses increases as you go deeper into this neighborhood.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Capitol Hill</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from State Street to 500 West and north of South Temple to city limits; this neighborhood was named for Utah’s grand Capitol Building.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Central City</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area between State Street and 700 East extending from South Temple to 700 South; points of interest include Trolley Square and Liberty Park.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Central City West</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from 300 West to I-15 and from South Temple to 1300 South; the neighborhood where the Vivint Smart Home Arena is located, home of the Utah Jazz.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Downtown</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from State Street to 300 West and South Temple to 700 South; downtown is bustling with attractions including the City Creek and Gateway malls along with world-famous Temple Square.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>East Central</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from 700 East to 1300 East and from South Temple to 1300 South; this quiet neighborhood is home to a few small concert venues and bars.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Fairpark</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from 500 West to 1460 West and North Temple to 600 North; this area boasts one of Utah’s most iconic restaurants, The Red Iguana.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Federal Heights</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area between Virginia Street and the University of Utah from 100 South to Federal Heights Drive; Federal heights is right next to one of the most well-known universities in the state.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Foothill and East Bench</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area stretching east of 1300 East to city limits between 500 South and I-89; popular attractions here include the Hogle Zoo, This is the Place Heritage Park, and Natural History Museum of Utah.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Glendale</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending west of I-15 to city limits from 950 South to 2100 South; this diverse neighborhood has over 25 different languages being spoken.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Liberty Wells</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from State Street to 700 East and 900 South to 2100 South; due to job and housing opportunities, this area is one of the most recommended neighborhoods for millennials in Salt Lake City.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Marmalade District</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from 300 North to 400 North and Quince Street to Center Street; this neighborhood is rich in history and beautiful architecture and named for imported pear and apricot trees planted in the 1900s.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Poplar Grove</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area stretching west from I-15 to city limits between North Temple and 950 South; this area is one of the largest neighborhoods in Salt Lake City.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Rose Park</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending west from I-15 to Redwood Road and north from 600 North to city limits; the streets in Rose Park were laid out to look like several roses with one of the main roads forming the stem.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Sugar House</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending south from 1700 South to city limits between 700 East and Foothill Drive; this part of the city is full of eclectic and vintage vibes.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>University</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending from 110 East to University Street and South Temple to 500 South; bustling with over 30,000 students, the University area is lively and hip.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Westpointe</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area extending west from Redwood Road to city limits and north from 700 North to city limits; this neighborhood encompasses the airport and nearby housing developments.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><strong>Yalecrest</strong><span style="font-weight: 400;"> – Area stretching from Sunnyside Avenue to 1300 South between 1300 East and 1500 East; Salt Lake City’s official ivy-league neighborhood.</span></li>
</ul>
<h3><b>Salt Lake City Neighborhood Map</b></h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-2482" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Salt-Lake-City_map.jpg" alt="District map of Salt Lake City" width="100%" /></p>
<div id="unique-identifier3"></div>
<h2>Salt Lake City Schools &amp; Stats</h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you have children then this is probably one of the most important things to think about before moving to Salt Lake City. Where are your kids going to go to school? How good is the school when compared to the others in the area? Does the school specialize in a certain subject and will your children enjoy that?</span></p>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Salt Lake City, there are two school districts: Salt Lake City School District and Granite School District. Located directly in Salt Lake City, there are:</span></p>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">39 Local Elementary Schools</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 Local Junior High / Middle Schools</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">7 Local High Schools</span></li>
</ul>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since there are so many schools to report on feel free to visit </span><a href="https://www.slcschools.org/schools/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Salt Lake City School District’s school directory</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and Granite School District </span><a href="https://www.graniteschools.org/schools/elementary-schools/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">elementary</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><a href="https://www.graniteschools.org/schools/junior-high-schools/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">junior high</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and </span><a href="https://www.graniteschools.org/schools/senior-high-schools/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">high school</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> directories for all their information. Here, we’ve broken down the interesting stats on four of the main high schools in the area so you can make an informed decision when moving to Salt Lake City. For more in-depth information, visit the links above and compare the below </span><a href="https://www.schools.utah.gov/data/reports" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">assessments</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p>
<h3><b>East High School</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Actual Enrollment 2017: </span><strong>1,923 students</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Graduation Rate for 2017: </span><strong>90%</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Student to Teacher Ratio for 2017: </span><strong>20 students/1 teacher</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average Cost for Student Lunch in 2017: </span><strong>$2.50</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">School Subject % Proficiency for 2017: </span><strong>27.7% Language Arts / 31.7% Mathematics / 23.4% Science</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average ACT score: </span><strong>19.3 Composite / 18.4 English / 20.5 Reading / 18.8 Math / 19.7 Science</strong></li>
</ul>
<h3><b>Highland High School</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Actual Enrollment 2017: </span><strong>1,645 students</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Graduation Rate for 2017: </span><strong>88%</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Student to Teacher Ratio for 2017: </span><strong>20 students/1 teacher</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average Cost for Student Lunch in 2017: </span><strong>$2.50</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">School Subject % Proficiency for 2017: </span><strong>30.5% Language Arts / 36.6% Mathematics / 27.7% Science </strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average ACT score: </span><strong>20.4 Composite / 19.6 English / 21.6 Reading / 19.8 Math / 20.9 Science</strong></li>
</ul>
<h3><b>Skyline High School<br />
</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Actual Enrollment: </span><strong>1,448 students</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Graduation Rate: </span><strong>95%</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Student-to-Teacher Ratio: </span><strong>16 students/1 teacher</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average Cost for Student Lunch: </span><strong>$1.75</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">School Subject % Proficiency: </span><strong>56.7% Language Arts / 34.6% Mathematics / 42.0% Science</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average ACT score: </span><strong>24.3 Composite / 24.3 English / 25.5 Reading / 23.4 Math / 24.3 Science</strong></li>
</ul>
<h3><b>West High School<br />
</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Actual Enrollment: </span><strong>2,380 students</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Graduation Rate: </span><strong>84%</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Student-to-Teacher Ratio: </span><strong>20 students/1 teacher</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average Cost for Student Lunch: </span><strong>$2.50</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">School Subject % Proficiency: </span><strong>37.0% Language Arts / 33.4% Mathematics / 33.8% Science</strong></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Average ACT score: </span><strong>20 Composite / 19.3 English / 21.2 Reading / 19.5 Math / 20.3 Science</strong></li>
</ul>
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<h2>Buying a Home in Salt Lake City</h2>
<p>The estimated average home price or condo value in Salt Lake City is currently $352,300 for a medium home with 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms.</p>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We’ve compiled a list of calculators to help you purchase a home in Salt Lake City and figure out how much you can afford when it comes to mortgages, refinancing, and affordability of homes you are looking at.</span></p>
<h3><b>Home Buying Calculators</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.zillow.com/mortgage-calculator/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mortgage calculator</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.zillow.com/mortgage-calculator/refinance-calculator/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Refinance calculator</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.zillow.com/mortgage-calculator/house-affordability/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Affordability calculator</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.zillow.com/mortgage-calculator/amortization-schedule-calculator/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Amortization calculator</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.zillow.com/mortgage-calculator/debt-to-income-calculator/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Debt-to-Income calculator</span></a></li>
</ul>
<h3><b>Other Home Buying Resources</b></h3>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/condo-vs-townhouse-your-ultimate-guide-to-choosing-the-right-home/">Condo vs Townhouse Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-save-for-a-house/">How to Save for a House</a></li> 
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/afford-payment-house/">Affording a Down Payment</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/what-is-a-good-credit-score-to-buy-a-house/">What is a Good Credit Score to Buy a House?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/first-time-home-buyer-loan/">How to get a First-time Home Buyer Loan</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-make-an-offer-on-a-house/">How to Make an Offer on a House</a></li> 	
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-long-does-it-take-to-close-on-a-house/">Closing on a House Guide</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/the-ultimate-home-inspection-checklist-for-buyers/">Home Inspection Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-get-rid-of-pmi-a-practical-guide-to-removing-private-mortgage-insurance/">How to Get Rid of PMI</a></li>
</ul>
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<h2>Apartments in Salt Lake City</h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Renting an apartment is almost as stressful as entering into a new relationship. You have to search for the perfect match, with the right amenities, price, location, features, and above all, the other tenants and your landlord have to be awesome. </span></p>
<p>You’ll be living in a neighborhood within a neighborhood—a community that functions within society, and you want to be in the best position possible. You need a landlord who fits your personality type so you don’t clash over the dumbest things, like if he can fix the lightbulb in the hallway or not. Luckily for you, we’ve compiled a few resources to help make the process seamless and easy.</p>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.zillow.com/rent-affordability-calculator/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rent Affordability Calculator</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.zillow.com/salt-lake-city-ut/rentals/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Zillow Apartments for Rent</span></a></li>
</ul>
<p>A few tips when looking at Salt Lake apartments for rent:</p>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Check out brand new properties.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Look at middle floor units.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">When you find a place you like, jump on it!</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Negotiate on a fixer-upper.</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Choose your amenities wisely.</span></li>
</ul>
<div id="unique-identifier7"></div>
<h2>Salt Lake City Cost of Living</h2>
<p>Currently the cost of living in Salt Lake City is indexed at 92.4 which is less than the average across the United States. This means it is relatively cheaper to live in Salt Lake City than most cities across the US.</p>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Find out from the locals how much groceries are, average rent/mortgages, property expenses, taxes, etc. The better idea you can get of the city and living conditions before arriving, the more prepared you can be—and also the more negotiating power you’ll have when you’re determining what to request for your salary if you are moving here for work. </span></p>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The cost of living index will help you understand if you can afford to live in Salt Lake City, Utah, how this city compares to other cities within Utah, and how Utah compares to others in the USA. Take the cost of living seriously and it could save you lots of money in the long run. </span></p>
<div id="unique-identifier8"></div>
<h2>Things To Do in Salt Lake City, Utah</h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What is there to do in Salt Lake City? More than you would think!</span></p>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Temple Square</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hogle Zoo</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Utah Museum of Fine Arts</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Red Butte Garden</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Antelope Island State Park</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tracy Aviary</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest</span></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bees baseball games</span></li>
</ul>
<h3><b>Salt Lake City Attraction Resources</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g60922-Activities-Salt_Lake_City_Utah.html" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">TripAdvisor List</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.visitsaltlake.com/things-to-do/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">List of Attractions</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.yelp.com/search?find_desc=Fun+Things+To+Do&amp;find_loc=Salt+Lake+City%2C+Salt+Lake+City%2C+UT" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yelp List</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.groupon.com/local/salt-lake-city/things-to-do" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Groupon List</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.trekaroo.com/places/salt-lake-city-utah/activities" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fun Things to do with Kids</span></a></li>
</ul>
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<h2>Salt Lake City Commuting &amp; Public Transit</h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">How accessible is Salt Lake City? Before settling down in any given neighborhood you need to check out how close it is to the main cities and attractions. We’ve compiled the best commuting times, average gas prices, and available public transit surrounding Salt Lake City below.</span></p>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Commuting Times can make or break an apartment or house when you are deciding on a place to live. Unless you want to be out in the open and in the countryside then I’d suggest looking up the typical travel times from Salt Lake City out to the nearest cities.</span></p>
<h3><b>Commuting Times</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Provo – 45 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Lehi – 30 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Sandy – 25 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Bountiful – 15 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Ogden – 35 minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Logan – 1 Hour and 15 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to St. George – 4 Hours and 10 Minutes</li>
</ul>
<h3><b>Travel Time from Salt Lake City to Utah Attractions and National Parks</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Park City – 40 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Bear Lake – 2 Hours and 15 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Yellowstone – 4 Hours and 40 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Zion National Park – 4 Hours and 30 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Arches National Park – 3 Hours and 30 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Canyonlands National Park – 3 Hours 50 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Capitol Reef National Park – 3 Hours and 20 Minutes</li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;">Time to Bryce Canyon National Park – 4 Hours</li>
</ul>
<h3><b>Available Public Transit</b></h3>
<ul>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.rideuta.com/Rider-Info/Station-Addresses" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Trax Routes</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.rideuta.com/Services/Bus" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bus Routes</span></a></li>
<li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://www.rideuta.com/Rider-Tools/Schedules-and-Maps/750-FrontRunner" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">FrontRunner Routes</span></a></li>
</ul>
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<h2>Cheap Self Storage in Salt Lake City</h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you are moving then you should seriously consider </span>self storage.<span style="font-weight: 400;"> It could take a while to find the perfect neighborhood in a day, week, month, or year. You’ll want to <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/Salt-Lake-City--Utah-self-storage?utm_source=blog">find a cheap self storage unit near you</a> that can protect your belongings while you continue your search for home. You need something flexible, cheap, and in a convenient location—you need Neighbor Storage. Neighbor’s got you covered with their self storage platform. The prices below speak for themselves.</span></p>
<h3><b>Average Price of Storage in Salt Lake:</b></h3>
<table>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td><b>Unit Size</b></td>
<td><b>Traditional Self Storage Unit Price</b></td>
<td><b>Neighbor’s Average Price</b></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">5 x 5</span></td>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">$43</span></td>
<td><b>$26</b></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">5 x 10</span></td>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">$62</span></td>
<td><b>$31</b></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 x 10</span></td>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">$108</span></td>
<td><b>$54</b></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 x 15</span></td>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">$140</span></td>
<td><b>$70</b></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 x 20</span></td>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">$174</span></td>
<td><b>$87</b></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 x 30</span></td>
<td><span style="font-weight: 400;">$240</span></td>
<td><b>$119</b></td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We’ve listed out all the unit sizes you could possibly imagine. You won’t need anything bigger than an 10 x 20 storage unit unless you are trying to store an RV in which case you should really be looking at Neighbor’s website for a space to save you money. The traditional self storage unit prices are almost double every time for every size of storage unit available. </span></p>
<p><a href="http://www.neighbor.com/?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Neighbor</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> provides storage at affordable costs, secure locations, and has on demand units so you can get a unit anytime, every time. </span><strong><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/Salt-Lake-City--Utah-self-storage?utm_source=blog&amp;utm_campaign=contentlinks">Find cheap Salt Lake City self storage</a> or <a href="http://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host/?utm_source=blog" target="_blank">rent out your extra space on Neighbor</a>. </strong></p>
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<h2>Salt Lake City Moving Guide Conclusion: Home Sweet Home?</h2>
<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can literally <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-new-city/">move anywhere in the United States</a>. According to a </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pew Research Center Survey</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, 37% of Americans have never lived outside their hometown and 57% have never lived outside their home state. Don’t fall into that statistic! Be a traveler, explorer, or nomad of the USA suburbia! Why not try living in Utah? If not, explore other new neighborhoods near you and only settle when you have found the city that fits your vibe.</span></p>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
      </a>
   </div>
   <div class="new-entry-cta-card">
      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
      </a>
   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-to-salt-lake-city-utah/">Moving to Salt Lake City, UT: A Neighbor Moving Guide [Updated]</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></content:encoded>
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		<title>How to Move a Couch: A Complete Guide</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 13 Oct 2020 19:00:50 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[furniture]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[moving house]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6472</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Whether you&#8217;re moving or just rearranging pieces of furniture, transporting a couch from one place to another can be a demanding job. A sofa is often the heaviest piece of furniture in a home. It&#8217;s awkwardly shaped and can be difficult to move even with a group of people. To figure out how to move [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch: A Complete Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Whether you&#8217;re <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-and-packing-tips-the-ultimate-guide-to-relocating-your-home/">moving </a>or just rearranging pieces of furniture, transporting a couch from one place to another can be a demanding job. A sofa is often the heaviest piece of furniture in a home. It&#8217;s awkwardly shaped and can be difficult to move even with a group of people. To figure out how to move a couch, you need to make certain preparations and take your time.</p>
<h2>Tools and Supplies for Moving a Couch</h2>
<p>Moving a couch or a love seat to a new home isn&#8217;t an easy job, but the right moving equipment can help. Before planning how to move a couch, gather these tools to simplify the job:</p>
<ul>
<li>Furniture Sliders</li>
<li>Furniture Dolly or Hand Truck</li>
<li>Helping Hands</li>
<li>Gloves</li>
<li>Measuring Tape</li>
<li>Heavy Duty Plastic Wrap, Bubble Wrap, or Large Plastic Bags</li>
<li>Furniture Blankets</li>
<li>Packing Tape</li>
<li>Lifting Straps</li>
<li>Tie Down Straps</li>
<li>Wide Wooden Board</li>
</ul>
<h2>How to Move a Couch: Your Step-by-Step Guide</h2>
<p>Whether you&#8217;re moving your couch across the room or across the country, safety should be your top priority. Heavy couches and even recliners can cause serious injuries when you use improper techniques. This step-by-step guide will help you understand how to move a couch safely.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>Don&#8217;t go beyond your limits and risk injury. If you find that you don&#8217;t have the necessary capabilities or DIY tools to move your couch, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">hire a professional moving company</a> to take care of the job for you. If you&#8217;re on the fence, get a moving quote from furniture movers so you can make the best choice for you.</p></blockquote>
<h3>1. Measure and Plan</h3>
<p>Your couch fits neatly into your living room, but it will suddenly feel much larger in a hallway — or when it&#8217;s stuck by a narrow door. When you measure your couch, make sure you include the spaces with the heaviest padding and largest corners, like the armrests. Measure the length, width, and depth of your couch. Plan the path you&#8217;ll take to get the couch outside and remove obstacles or big, heavy items accordingly. It may even be necessary to remove doors to provide extra space to fit the couch through tight doorways.</p>
<h3>2. Wrap the Couch</h3>
<p>Protecting your couch&#8217;s upholstery from protruding objects and dirt and grime is essential. First, remove cushions and loose pillows. These can be packed separately in a box. Remove the legs, arms, and any pieces of large sectionals that are detachable. If you&#8217;re moving a sleeper sofa, remove the mattress to eliminate extra weight. Wrap the entire couch in plastic wrap and tape up any loose ends.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If your couch is upholstered with delicate materials like leather, it&#8217;s best to wrap the couch with moving blankets before using plastic wrap or shrink wrap, as plastic can damage the material.</p></blockquote>
<h3>3. Move the Couch</h3>
<p>No matter what your plan for moving the couch, prepare to adapt to keep everyone safe. Make communication a priority so everyone is ready to lift at the same time and take breaks as needed. If you have a furniture dolly available, tip the couch vertically and slide it onto the dolly. Use tie-down straps to secure it in place.</p>
<p>Slowly maneuver the couch along the planned path. Tight corners and doorways can be tricky and may require you to pivot, angle, or change your carrying methods to get through a narrow area. Remain patient and communicate with your helpers for the best solution. Not only will this keep people safe, but it will also protect your hardwood floors</p>
<h3>4. Load the Couch</h3>
<p>Some couches can be loaded into a moving van, SUV, or pickup truck. For very large couches, your best bet will probably be a moving truck. If you&#8217;re using a moving truck, there is likely a loading ramp included. With one person on each side, roll the dolly into the moving truck. Angle the furniture dolly to balance the couch and remove the tie-down straps. Using two people, slide the couch off the dolly and position it for safe transit in the moving truck.</p>
<p>If you&#8217;re working without a dolly, or loading your couch into a van or SUV, use the same method of lifting with at least one person on each side. Load the couch and position it for transport. Use tie-down straps to avoid shifting during transport.</p>
<h2>How to Move a Couch Up or Down Stairs</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6474" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Moving-a-Couch-Up-and-Down-Stairs-Neighbor.jpg" alt="Two young men are carrying a heavy couch downstairs" width="1254" height="836" /></p>
<p>Narrow stairways, steep steps, and even wide, stable stairs can be a challenge when moving a heavy couch. Remember that a dolly or furniture sliders cannot be used on stairs, so you will definitely need help. As with any couch-moving plan, it&#8217;s essential to begin by planning your path and measuring the space you&#8217;ll have in the stairwell. It&#8217;s best to have at least two helpers to navigate a couch up or downstairs. Use these steps to figure out how to move a couch past any set of stairs safely.</p>
<h3>1. Assign a Navigator</h3>
<p>Since you&#8217;ve planned your path and taken careful measurements, you know how many steps you&#8217;ll have to endure. Still, there&#8217;s a very good chance you won&#8217;t be able to see them with a couch obstructing your view. One of your helpers should walk ahead to help the lifters navigate the path downstairs.</p>
<h3>2. Lift Carefully</h3>
<p>With one mover at each end of the couch, lift from the bottom of the couch for best maneuverability. Be sure all lifters know how to avoid injury and squat instead of bending at the waist to lift heavy furniture.</p>
<h3>3. Use Objects to Help Handle the Load</h3>
<p>If you&#8217;re navigating a short flight of steps, it&#8217;s worth your time and money to purchase a wide wooden board to create a makeshift ramp. This way, you can simply position the couch on the ramp and slide it down the flight of steps. If you&#8217;re navigating a longer stairwell, and a banister is available, it can also be used to distribute weight.</p>
<p>Tilt the couch so it&#8217;s above the banister to add additional support. Keep in mind that while a banister is helpful, it doesn&#8217;t provide a wide support for a heavy couch. Ensure that all helpers maintain a firm grip when the couch is resting on the railing.</p>
<h2>How To Move a Couch by Yourself</h2>
<p>If you didn&#8217;t hire a moving crew and don&#8217;t want to recruit your good friends as helping hands, you&#8217;ll need to get creative when it comes to moving your couch. While moving heavy furniture can be done alone, it&#8217;s important to understand your capabilities and avoid pushing yourself. After all, a serious injury could cost you a lot more than hiring someone to help you move. Use these tips to decide how to move a couch by yourself.</p>
<h3>1. Estimate Your Capabilities</h3>
<p>When you&#8217;re deciding exactly how to move a couch from one space to another, you need to know what you&#8217;re capable of. Can you handle turning your couch on one end to slide or roll it across rooms, through tight doorways, and down narrow hallways? Are you able to safely lift one end of your couch alone? If you&#8217;re unable to lift one end of the couch, you&#8217;ll need help to move it safely.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip:</h4>
<p>If you can&#8217;t call on someone you know to help you, a site like <a href="https://www.taskrabbit.com/" target="_blank">TaskRabbit </a>might provide the one-time assistance you need.</p></blockquote>
<h3>2. Determine Your Plan of Action</h3>
<p>To move your couch alone, you&#8217;ll need some tools of the trade. If you&#8217;re capable of turning your couch up on one end and maneuvering it to the vehicle that way, a furniture dolly will provide your easiest course of action. If the couch needs to stay flat, oversized furniture sliders will help it glide smoothly to its destination.</p>
<p>No matter which tools you choose, always make safety a priority. Take the time to secure the couch firmly with tie-down straps if you&#8217;re using a dolly. Stop when you&#8217;ve reached your limits. Never risk injury with creative lifting tactics.</p>
<h3>3. Load Carefully</h3>
<p>This step could be the biggest hurdle when moving your couch alone, so take your time and navigate carefully. If you rented a moving truck, there should be a ramp available. In this case, you simply need to roll or slide your couch up the ramp and safely into the waiting truck.</p>
<p>If you&#8217;re without a loading ramp, it&#8217;s time to get creative. If your couch isn&#8217;t already vertical, turn it up on one end. Position yourself at the bottom end and hoist the couch into your vehicle. If the couch is too heavy to lift in this position, it&#8217;s time to get help. Knock on your neighbor&#8217;s door or grab that random jogger passing by. You didn&#8217;t get this far to end up with an injury. Once you get the couch loaded, secure it in place, and pat yourself on the back. You deserve it.</p>
<p>The prospect of moving your couch to a new house might have you wondering if it&#8217;s worth moving in the first place or if you should hire professional movers. However, once you properly learn how to move a couch, the job isn&#8217;t as difficult as it seems and you can save on moving costs. Being able to load your own couch can simplify <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/comprehensive-guide-shipping-furniture/">the furniture shipping process</a>, too. Always remember to thank any helpers for a job well done and be prepared to provide them with a cold drink when the heavy lifting is complete.</p>
<h2>More Moving Resources</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
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         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch: A Complete Guide</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Kitchen Colors: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing the Best Color for your Kitchen</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/kitchen-colors/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/kitchen-colors/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 13 Oct 2020 16:00:50 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Lifestyle]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6477</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>When choosing your kitchen colors, what’s the right strategy? Do you just pick some colors you like, and then hit the paint chip display at your local hardware store? Do you look for colors on sale to save a few bucks? They’re just paint colors — not exactly a high-stakes decision, right? Well, not necessarily. As [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/kitchen-colors/">Kitchen Colors: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing the Best Color for your Kitchen</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>When choosing your kitchen colors, what’s the right strategy?</p>
<p>Do you just pick some colors you like, and then hit the paint chip display at your local hardware store? Do you look for colors on sale to save a few bucks? They’re just paint colors — not exactly a high-stakes decision, right?</p>
<p><span id="more-6477"></span></p>
<p>Well, not necessarily.</p>
<p>As it turns out, the colors you choose for your kitchen can be more impactful than you might ever have considered. Did you know that paint colors can affect us psychologically, impacting our sense of depth and space, our mood — even our appetite, making this choice all the more important when it comes to the kitchen?</p>
<p>It’s true, and we’re going to explain everything below. Before we get started though, a note: When choosing kitchen colors or any other colors for your home, you can take these psychology theories into account or ignore them and just choose colors you love. It’s your home, and it’s up to you. That said, though, the psychology behind paint colors is pretty fascinating, so let’s dive in.</p>
<h2>How Psychology Can Play a Role In Choosing Kitchen Colors</h2>
<p>Those who are experienced in interior design already know how much colors can change the way we’re influenced by spaces — and that goes for everywhere in our homes, not just the kitchen.</p>
<p>Bright and strong colors can add more life to a space, especially one that doesn’t get energy from natural light. Using colors and materials with little contrast can help a small space feel roomier. There are many, many examples of how designers use colors to influence how we perceive spaces.</p>
<p>So how can that help you decide on your kitchen colors? It really depends on your space and your goals. Here are a few psychology factors to keep in mind when shopping paint chips, wallpaper, tiles, and other color elements for your kitchen.</p>
<h3>Color Affects Our Perception of Depth and Space<em><i> </i></em></h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6485" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/01-Before-After-IG.jpg" alt="Color Affects Our Perception of Depth and Space " width="1788" height="918" /></p>
<p>This will be especially useful for anyone who has a small cramped kitchen. Colors can trick the way our brains perceive a space in some really interesting ways.</p>
<p>You might have already heard that dark colors will make a space seem smaller and more closed-off, while light colors will brighten it and make it seem larger. That’s one of the oldest tricks in the interior design playbook.</p>
<p>But did you know that having contrasting colors will also make the space feel smaller? For that reason, if possible, you should choose your floor, counter, and cabinet colors to match the color you choose for the wall, if you’re trying to make your space look larger. For maximum effect, make everything a similar, light shade.</p>
<h3>Color Affects Our Moods<em><i> </i></em></h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6483" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/02-IG-Kitchen-Examples-1.png" alt="Color Affects Our Moods " width="800" height="726" /></p>
<p>Another well-known trick in interior design is choosing colors to evoke certain moods.</p>
<p>Here are just some of the most popular kitchen colors, and the feelings they tend to inspire:</p>
<ul>
<li><b></b><strong><b>Red</b></strong>: Passion and energy. Seeing a red wall can raise your heart rate and give you more energy. But it’s also associated with anger and passion, which is why, in homes, you’re more likely to see a red accent wall than an entirely red room.</li>
<li><b></b><strong><b>Blue</b></strong>: Calm. Blue tones remind us of the ocean and the sky, and might make some people feel sleepy and relaxed. In hot climates, using blue tiles or ceramic in a kitchen can give the space a cooler feel.</li>
<li><b></b><strong><b>Green</b></strong>: Fresh and healthy. Green tends to remind us of plants and nature, which inspires feelings of harmony and balance. It also subconsciously makes us think of healthy, nutritious foods, which is why green is such a popular choice in kitchens.</li>
<li><b></b><strong><b>Yellow</b></strong>: Happiness and energy. It’s said that yellow stimulates the analytical part of our brains, but that it also suppresses creativity and may make some people feel uneasy. That’s why so many fast food restaurants have yellow walls: They want their customers to eat quickly and move on.</li>
<li><b></b><strong><b>White or gray</b></strong>: Maturity and security. White and gray are very trendy kitchen colors right now, which isn’t surprising considering they convey an air of class and success. A bright, white kitchen will feel open and clean, and gray accents can help provide the depth needed to keep the space from feeling too sterile.</li>
</ul>
<h3>Color Affects Our Appetite</h3>
<p>One very surprising psychological factor you might consider when choosing kitchen colors is how colors can affect our appetite.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6487 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/03-How-Color-Affects-Appetite-1.png" alt="Color Affects Our Appetite" width="1788" height="1344" /></p>
<p><em><i> </i></em>Ever wondered why so many restaurants use red tablecloths? Because red is an energizing color that evokes passion and can raise your heart rate, it can also increase your appetite. Restaurants are doing this to get their customers to eat more!</p>
<p>Red isn’t the only color that can affect how much you eat. Studies have shown that yellow and orange hues increase your brain’s serotonin production, which can also stimulate your appetite.</p>
<p>On the other hand, because they’re calming colors that tend to make people feel relaxed or sleepy, blue and green tones can actually have the opposite effect and suppress your appetite.</p>
<h2>Factors to Consider When Choosing Kitchen Colors</h2>
<p>The psychology aspects are fun to consider when choosing kitchen colors, but there’s a lot more you can take into account. These other factors can help you narrow down your choices to the perfect color for your space.</p>
<h3>Keep Things Neutral</h3>
<p>It can be tempting to choose a bright, trendy color, but neutrals tend to be more timeless and able to stand the test of time. If you want a kitchen that won’t look dated any time soon, sticking to neutrals can be a good strategy. Don’t forget, you can use dishes, towels, rugs, and other accessories to add pops of color.</p>
<h3>Consider Your Lighting</h3>
<p>The same color can look wildly different under different types of lighting. That’s why it’s very important to take your light into consideration when choosing colors for your kitchen. A kitchen with big windows and a lot of natural light might look nice in a darker shade that you wouldn’t want to use for an interior kitchen with harsh, LED lighting. Whatever colors you consider, make sure to test them in your actual space to see how they look with the lighting you have.</p>
<h3>Mind Other Details in the Room</h3>
<p>Maybe you’ve always dreamed of bright yellow kitchen walls, but your kitchen already has blue floor tiles and gray countertops. Or maybe you’d like a crisp, all-white kitchen, but you have to work with your home’s existing dark wood lintels.</p>
<p>All this to say, when choosing a color scheme, consider other parts of the room that you can’t change. Sure, flooring and counters can be replaced, but if you don’t have the time and budget for that kind of project, you might need to limit yourself to a paint color that complements what’s already there.</p>
<h3>Mix Colors Carefully</h3>
<p>There’s nothing wrong with mixing different color palettes in one room, but it’s important to make sure the finished product won’t be a clashing eyesore.</p>
<p>If you plan to use more than one bold color, gather all the elements you’re considering — flooring, countertops, cabinets, and paint — and see how they all look together in the space. Do this before installing anything, and don’t be afraid to change your mind if they clash too much.</p>
<h2>How to Choose the Perfect Kitchen Color</h2>
<p>Ready to get started and choose the perfect color for your kitchen? Use this checklist to make sure the color you end up with is just right for your space.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6480 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/04-Perfect-Kitchen-Color-Checklist.png" alt="How to Choose the Perfect Kitchen Color" width="1788" height="1340" /></p>
<ul>
<li>Start thinking about colors you might like. Choose a variety of colors to explore, but not so many that you’ll have a hard time narrowing your choice down. 3-5 potential colors is a good starting point.</li>
<li>Lay out samples of all the finishes going in your kitchen, if needed. This is only necessary if you’re building or renovating your kitchen from scratch. If floors, cabinets, and counters are already installed, then just lay out paint chips to see how they look against the other finishes, in your space, with the lighting you have.</li>
<li>Use the process of elimination to remove colors one at a time until you have a decision.</li>
<li>Use a tester can of paint to paint a small area of the kitchen in your chosen color. Take a break so you can see it with fresh eyes. Step back and really evaluate how it looks. Make sure you love it before you go ahead with painting the entire kitchen.</li>
<li>Don’t be afraid to try another color if it doesn’t look quite right.</li>
<li>Once you’ve decided for sure on a color you love, paint the whole room, and enjoy!</li>
</ul>
<p>The kitchen is one of the most important rooms in a home, and the color scheme of the room can make or break it. By using this guide to choose the perfect color, you can make your kitchen into a place where you love to spend time preparing meals, being with family and friends, and enjoying a space that is truly your own.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/kitchen-colors/">Kitchen Colors: The Ultimate Guide to Choosing the Best Color for your Kitchen</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>How to Move a Mattress or a Sleep Number Bed</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 06 Oct 2020 19:00:19 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Moving Tips]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to guide]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to move]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[how to store]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Storage Tips]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6465</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Finding the best mattress that truly gives you a good night&#8217;s sleep is no easy task. If you&#8217;re planning to move or store your mattress in another location instead of getting a new mattress, transporting that mattress without damage can be difficult, as well. A mattress can be hard to carry, load, and safely move [&#8230;]</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress or a Sleep Number Bed</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Finding the best mattress that truly gives you a good night&#8217;s sleep is no easy task. If you&#8217;re planning to move or <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/mattress-storage/">store your mattress</a> in another location instead of getting a new mattress, transporting that mattress without damage can be difficult, as well. A mattress can be hard to carry, load, and safely move from one place to another. Luckily, a few tools and the right procedure can make the job a lot easier. Follow these steps to learn how to move a mattress safely and without hassle.</p>
<h2>Tools and Moving Supplies</h2>
<p>A big part of learning how to move your mattress correctly is discovering what DIY tools you need. Those mattress moving tools and materials include:</p>
<ul>
<li>Mattress Bag</li>
<li>Packing Tape</li>
<li>Bubble Wrap</li>
<li>Ratchet Straps</li>
<li>Cardboard</li>
<li>Helping Hands (optional but preferred)</li>
</ul>
<h2>How to Move a Mattress: Your Step-by-Step Guide</h2>
<p>If you&#8217;re taking the time to move your spring or memory foam mattress yourself, keeping it in pristine shape is important to you. If you have time, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-clean-a-mattress-a-complete-guide/">cleaning your mattress</a> before transport will make it fresh for your new space. Taking certain precautions when you pack and move your mattress will keep it from getting damaged during transport. Following these steps can help you understand how to move a mattress without damage.</p>
<h3>1. Create Adequate Working Space</h3>
<p>Your mattress is big, bulky, and awkward to move around. Don&#8217;t make it the first piece of furniture you move from the room. Move bedside tables, lamps, dressers, and other furniture from the bedroom to provide space to freely move the mattress. You can even lean your mattress against a wall to disassemble and remove the bed frame to provide more floor space.</p>
<h3>2. Put on the Mattress Bag</h3>
<p>A high-quality mattress bag will protect your mattress from dirt, weather, and other potential risks. Putting on the mattress bag is a bit like packing a giant sandwich. With the mattress lying flat on the floor, simply slide each side up a little at a time until the mattress is fully enclosed. You can take the same steps to protect your box spring. Press any extra air from the bag, then fold over the top and tape the bag securely.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Mattress:</h4>
<p>If you&#8217;re moving multiple mattresses at once, label the mattress bags for easy sorting and placement when you get to your new home.</p></blockquote>
<h3>3. Transport the Mattress to the Vehicle</h3>
<p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6467" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Couple-Moving-a-Mattress-in-a-Mattress-Bag-Neighbor-1.jpg" alt="couple moving a mattress packed in a mattress bag down the stairs" width="5200" height="3455" /></p>
<p>This is a great time to have those helping hands we mentioned. Having friends, family members, or neighbors to help you with the heavy lifting is the best way to avoid injury to yourself and damage to the mattress. Clear a wide path from the bedroom to the moving truck before lifting the mattress. With one person at each end of the mattress, turn the mattress up on one side and carry or slide it along your cleared path.</p>
<h4>Can I learn how to move a mattress by myself?</h4>
<p>If you must move the mattress alone, you should reinforce it with cardboard after putting on the mattress bag to increase stability and make it less floppy. Then, slide the mattress onto a furniture dolly and secure it in place with tie-down straps. Be sure to take your time getting the mattress outside to avoid slippage.</p>
<h3>4. Load the Mattress</h3>
<p>Getting the mattress into your chosen vehicle may be the most difficult task. For the easiest loading and transportation without damage, a moving van or pickup truck is your best choice. However, it&#8217;s possible to move your mattress with your own vehicle.</p>
<h4>Van , U-Haul, or Moving Truck</h4>
<p>While some larger mattresses won&#8217;t fit into a van, many sizes will. If you have the space, you can lie your mattress flat on the floor of the van. However, it&#8217;s important to remember not to place any heavy furniture or items with sharp edges or corners on top or against your mattress, especially if it&#8217;s a memory foam mattress. Consider protecting it with moving blankets. You can also pack the mattress upright against a vehicle wall.</p>
<h4>Pickup Truck</h4>
<p>Practically any mattress can be hauled safely in a truck. The mattress should lay flat in the truck bed or on top of the wheel wells. It might be necessary to leave the tailgate down if the mattress is a king-size. Avoid placing anything on top of the mattress. You can safely haul the box spring beneath the mattress, but other items shouldn&#8217;t be under the mattress during transport.</p>
<h4>Car</h4>
<p>Transporting a mattress on the roof of a car should always be a last resort. Many cars are too narrow to support a queen-size mattress or king-size mattress, so measure before carrying the mattress outside. Then carefully place the mattress on the roof of the car to avoid puncturing the mattress bag on luggage racks or other protrusions.</p>
<h3>5. Secure the Mattress</h3>
<p>Ensuring your mattress won&#8217;t slip, shift, or fall during transport is a vital step in the process. If the mattress is laid flat and has no room to shift in a van or moving truck, you won&#8217;t need to tie it in place. If the mattress is placed against a wall, a strap must be placed across it to avoid shifting.<br />
Even if your mattress seems secure in a truck bed, it&#8217;s always best to place a strap across it. Air can get beneath the mattress during travel and lift the mattress out of the truck. If the tailgate is open, also place a strap over the length of the mattress.</p>
<p>If your mattress is on the roof of your car, then this step is vital. While <a href="https://vandimensions.com/info/is-it-illegal-to-tie-a-mattress-to-your-car" target="_blank">transporting your mattress on the roof isn&#8217;t illegal</a>, it can cause you to break other traffic laws like driving with an obstructed view or exceeding the vehicle length limit. Place straps across the mattress in two places. The straps will need to run through the windows across the inside of the car&#8217;s roof. Another strap must be placed over the length of the mattress and tied to the vehicle&#8217;s frame. For best results, avoid highways and take side roads for slower travel. It&#8217;s also a great idea to have a friend drive behind you to alert you if the mattress begins to slip.</p>
<blockquote>
<h4>Pro Tip for How to Move a Mattress:</h4>
<p>If you&#8217;re traveling a long distance, stop regularly and ensure the straps remain tight. As the mattress begins to settle, straps or ropes will likely loosen.</p></blockquote>
<h2>How to Move a Sleep Number Bed</h2>
<p>Moving the mattress on a Sleep Number bed is considerably different from moving a regular mattress. To move your Sleep Number bed, you&#8217;ll need to deflate and disassemble the mattress. Asking a friend to help can make the process safer and easier, but you can manage the task without professional movers. Learn how to move a Sleep Number bed with these steps.</p>
<h3>1. Deflate the Mattress</h3>
<p>Use your controller to deflate your Sleep Number mattress. Simply press the down arrow until the display reads zero to remove all air from the mattress chambers. If your mattress has a double chamber, you&#8217;ll need to press the right or left side button while pressing the down arrow.</p>
<h3>2. Disassemble the Mattress</h3>
<p>Unzip the mattress while it&#8217;s still in a flat position. Remove the hose by gently pressing the gray tab, then simply pull out the hose. Repeat the process on the other side of the bed. Some beds have two hoses per chamber, so you may need to consult your manual to determine how many hoses your mattress contains.</p>
<p>Remove all internal mattress components. Taking a picture of each layer as you remove it can make reassembly a simple process. Unplug the Firmness Control System from the wall and leave the hoses attached.</p>
<h3>3. Securely Pack the Pump</h3>
<p>The pump to your Sleep Number mattress is fragile and must be packed carefully to avoid damage. Pack it snugly into a box with packing materials to keep it firmly in place. Make sure the pump cannot move freely inside the box.</p>
<h3>4. Pack the Mattress</h3>
<p>When the mattress is disassembled into large pieces, packing the components is as simple as folding or rolling the foam pads and mattress cover to fit into your chosen containers. Your mattress parts can be packed into hard storage tubs or heavy-duty moving boxes.</p>
<h3>5. Disassemble the Base and Load the Parts</h3>
<p>Your Sleep Number bed may have a modular base, a flex-fit base, or no base at all. Disassemble your Sleep Number base according to the manufacturer&#8217;s instructions. A modular base is heavy and will likely require help to carry and load into your vehicle. Loose parts of a flex-fit base should be packaged securely and placed in boxes or storage bins.</p>
<p>Loading your Sleep Number mattress is as simple as carrying your chosen boxes to the vehicle and securing them safely for transport. Always be sure to have a helper or furniture dolly to move heavy boxes.</p>
<p>Moving your mattress takes a little effort, but it&#8217;s worth your time if you love the surface you sleep on. Once you know all the details about how to move a mattress and find a friend to help, the job gets much easier. Once you have your familiar bed in your new home, you can get a good night&#8217;s sleep — you&#8217;ll definitely have earned it.</p>
<h2>More Moving Resources</h2>
<h4>Moving and Packing Items</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-couch-a-complete-guide/">How to Move a Couch</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-refrigerator/">How to Move a Refrigerator</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-piano/">How to Move a Piano</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-move-a-pool-table/">How to Move a Pool Table</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/pack-shoes-moving/">How to Pack Shoes for Moving</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-to-pack-dishes-and-glasses-for-a-move/">How to Pack Dishes and Glasses</a></li>
</ul>

<h4>Other Moving Resources</h4>
<ul>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/ultimate-moving-checklist/">Ultimate Moving Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/free-moving-boxes/">Where to Find Free Moving Boxes</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/5-tips-hiring-movers-packers/">Tips for Hiring Movers and Packers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/how-much-to-tip-movers/">How Much to Tip Movers</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/should-you-stage-your-home-when-selling/">Should you Stage your Home When Selling?</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/change-of-address-checklist/">Change of Address Checklist</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-kids-15-tips-smooth-move/">Moving with Kids</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/moving-with-a-dog/">Moving with a Dog</a></li>
<li><a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/unpacking/">Ultimate Guide to Unpacking</a></li>
</ul>
<section class="new-entry-cta">
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      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space">   
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/host.jpg)"></div>
         <span>Rent Out Your<br>Unused Space</span>
         <p>Make $50-$500 each month renting your garage, driveway, shed or other storage space</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/how-to-host?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=list_your_space" class="btn btn-cta">List Your Space</a>
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      <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage">
         <div class="card-icon" style="background-image: url(https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/renter.png)"></div>
         <span>Save 50% <br>on Storage</span>
         <p>Find storage in your own neighborhood at half the cost of a self storage unit</p>
         <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/search/?utm_source=blog&utm_medium=article_cta&campaign=find_storage" class="btn btn-cta">Find Storage</a> 
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   </div>
</section>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/move-mattress-sleep-number-bed/">How to Move a Mattress or a Sleep Number Bed</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Ranking: The 25 Most Neighborly Cities in America</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Mon, 28 Sep 2020 13:00:39 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Lifestyle]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6431</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>Everyone wants great neighbors. But where do the most neighborly people live? These are the 25 most neighborly cities in America.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/">Ranking: The 25 Most Neighborly Cities in America</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>Everyone wants good neighbors.</p>
<p>When you get along with the people around you and know you can count on them (and they can count on you), it creates a feeling of neighborhood solidarity, builds community, and keeps everyone safer. A recent <a href="https://www.huduser.gov/portal/periodicals/em/summer16/highlight2.html" target="_blank"><u>Housing and Urban Development study</u></a> showed that while neighborhood crime rates are lower in the U.S. than they’ve ever been before, strong community bonds are closely associated with safe neighborhoods where people have a sense of community well-being.</p>
<p>But where in the U.S. can you find <em><i>the best</i></em>, most friendly neighbors? And what does it actually mean to be neighborly? We wanted to find out.<br />
<span id="more-6431"></span></p>
<p><a href="#infographic">[Check out the full rankings infographic]</a></p>
<p>We scoured the web for data about different things that we think make friendly neighbors: People looking out for each other, doing favors for one another, and just acting like good neighbors. Then, we analyzed that data to see which cities in the U.S. have the best neighbors — and are the most neighborly.</p>
<p><strong>According to our data, the top 25 most neighborly cities are:</strong></p>
<ol>
<li>Augusta, Georgia</li>
<li>Salt Lake City, Utah</li>
<li>Columbia, South Carolina</li>
<li>Lancaster, Pennsylvania</li>
<li>Portland, Oregon</li>
<li>Minneapolis, Minnesota</li>
<li>Washington, D.C.</li>
<li>Spokane, Washington</li>
<li>Greenville, South Carolina</li>
<li>Rochester, New York</li>
<li>Ogden, Utah</li>
<li>Jacksonville, Florida</li>
<li>Seattle, Washington</li>
<li>Colorado Springs, Colorado</li>
<li>Sacramento, California</li>
<li>Bridgeport, Connecticut</li>
<li>Lakeland, Florida</li>
<li>Baton Rouge, Louisiana</li>
<li>Denver, Colorado</li>
<li>Grand Rapids, Michigan</li>
<li>Tucson, Arizona</li>
<li>Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</li>
<li>Charlotte, North Carolina</li>
<li>Honolulu, Hawaii</li>
<li>Fort Myers, Florida</li>
</ol>
<p>What makes these spots more neighborly and friendlier than all the rest? It was a combination of these factors (a more detailed methodology can be found at the end of this article):</p>
<ul>
<li>Charitable giving;</li>
<li>“Formal volunteering,” or volunteering for organizations;</li>
<li>“Informal volunteering,” or doing favors for friends, family, and neighbors;</li>
<li>Community well-being, which came from a study that surveyed people on whether they felt safe, happy, and proud of their home communities.</li>
</ul>
<p>Here are the factors that made each of our top 25 cities some of the most neighborly in the U.S.</p>
<h2>The 25 Most Neighborly Cities in America</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6433 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/01-Augusta-GA.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - Augusta" width="1789" height="573" /></p>
<h3>#1: Augusta, Georgia</h3>
<p>We found the No. 1 most neighborly place in the U.S. to be Augusta, Georgia, and there were a lot of reasons for that.</p>
<p>For one, 87.5 percent of itemized tax returns filed by people living in Augusta included charitable giving. The average amount that those folks donated to charity was almost $7,000. But there’s more to being neighborly than just being charitable.</p>
<p>We also found that nearly 25 percent of the population has put in hours volunteering for an organization they believe in, and according to census data, almost 9 percent of people reported doing some “informal volunteering,” which includes doing favors for friends and neighbors. That’s the very definition of being neighborly!</p>
<p>And to top it all off, we found that 11.2 percent of workers in Augusta carpool, above the national average of 9 percent. Coworkers helping each other get to work? That’s pretty neighborly, too.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6434 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/02-SLC-UT.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - salt lake city" width="1789" height="574" /></p>
<h3>#2: Salt Lake City, Utah</h3>
<p>Coming in at the No. 2 spot is Salt Lake City, Utah, where charitable giving really makes the city stand out. 83.6 percent of people who filed itemized tax returns in Salt Lake gave to charity, and they gave, on average, 5.9 percent of their total income (the fourth highest amount in the entire U.S.). That comes out to an average itemized donation of $9,274.</p>
<p>Salt Lake’s volunteerism is nothing to sneeze at, either. 36 percent of people who live there report volunteering for organizations they love.</p>
<p>And when it comes to helping out their coworkers and neighbors? Salt Lake has a carpooling rate of 12 percent — higher than the national average. It’s clear that this is a city where people take being neighborly seriously.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6435 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/03-Columbia-SC.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - columbia" width="1789" height="574" /></p>
<h3>#3: Columbia, South Carolina</h3>
<p>Coming in third is Columbia, South Carolina, where 85 percent of itemized tax deductions included charitable giving. Folks who live in Columbia were making sizeable gifts, too — the average amount of an itemized donation was $6,324.</p>
<p>While formal volunteering in Columbia was pretty average, the city had a high rate of informal volunteering — 7.3 percent of its people reported that they love doing favors for friends and neighbors, which is the very definition of being neighborly, if you ask us.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6436 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/04-Lancaster-PA.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - lancaster" width="1789" height="574" /></p>
<h3>#4: Lancaster, Pennsylvania</h3>
<p>In our No. 4 city, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 12.9 percent of workers carpool, which is way above the national average of just 9 percent. In addition to that, Lancaster ranked 19th in the entire U.S. in a 2018 community wellbeing study, which showed this city is a place where people feel safe, like to live, and take pride in their community.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6437 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/05-Portland-OR.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - portland" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#5: Portland, Oregon</h3>
<p>In Portland, Oregon, nearly a third of all people report volunteering for organizations they believe in — 31 percent, according to census data. In addition to that, 6 percent say they “informally volunteer” by doing favors for people around them, including their neighbors. Pretty neighborly, if you ask us.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6438 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/06-Minneapolis-MN.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - minneapolis" width="1789" height="574" /></p>
<h3>#6: Minneapolis, Minnesota</h3>
<p>In No. 6 Minneapolis, Minnesota, almost 85 percent of itemized tax returns showed some charitable giving. But where Minneapolis really shines is how much its residents volunteer — more than 37 percent of them give their time to organizations they love, one of the highest volunteer rates in the country.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6439 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/07-Washington-DC.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - washington dc" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#7: Washington, D.C.</h3>
<p>Washington, D.C. is another city where the charity of its residents landed it high in our rankings — No. 7, to be exact. 82.5 percent of itemized tax returns in D.C. include gifts to charity, and a third of residents report putting in volunteer hours to make their community better, according to census data.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6440 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/08-Spokane-WA.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - spokane" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#8: Spokane, Washington</h3>
<p>No. 8 is Spokane, Washington, where a quarter of people put in formal volunteer hours, according to census data, but where 5.8 percent of people report doing “informal” volunteering, like just helping out the people in their neighborhoods.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6441 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/09-Greenville-SC.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - greenville" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#9: Greenville, South Carolina</h3>
<p>What makes our No. 9 city, Greenville, South Carolina, stand out, is that 11.2 percent of workers there carpool — more than the national average of carpoolers. Add in the fact that 86.2 percent of itemized tax returns from Greenville included donations to charity, and you’ve got one neighborly city.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6442 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/10-Rochester-NY.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - rochester" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#10: Rochester, New York</h3>
<p>Rounding out the top 10 most neighborly cities is Rochester, New York, where 83.3 percent of people who filed itemized tax returns reported making donations to charity. What makes Rochester even more neighborly, though, is that nearly a third of the people who live there — 32.5 percent, to be exact — report spending time volunteering.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6443 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/11-Ogden-UT.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - ogden" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#11: Ogden, Utah</h3>
<p>Ogden, Utah, in our No. 11 spot, stands out for how charitable its residents are. An incredible 87 percent of itemized tax returns from Ogden residents included donations to charity, but that’s not even all — the average Ogden resident donated 6.9 percent of their income (the second highest percentage in the nation). That makes the average total charitable donations from someone living in Ogden $9,219.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6444 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/12-Jacksonville-FL.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - jacksonville" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#12: Jacksonville, Florida</h3>
<p>Our No. 12 city, Jacksonville, Florida, has plenty of charitable residents — 82.9 percent of itemized tax returns included gifts to charity. But where Jacksonville really stands out is the number of people helping each other get to work — 11.5 percent of all workers there carpool. That’s well above the 9 percent national average.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6445 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/13-Seattle-WA.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - seattle" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#13: Seattle, Washington</h3>
<p>Seattle, Washington is above average in neighborliness according to almost every one of our metrics. 80.3 percent of itemized tax returns included charitable donations, 31.3 percent of Seattle residents spend time volunteering, and 10 percent of Seattle workers carpool with friends or coworkers.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6446 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/14-Colorado-Springs-CO.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - colorado springs" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#14: Colorado Springs, Colorado</h3>
<p>The people of Colorado certainly have a reputation for being friendly. For those in Colorado Springs, it’s a combination of their above average gifts to charity — 80.9 percent of itemized tax returns include charitable donations — and their willingness to help each other get to work — 9.7 percent of all workers in the city carpool.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6447 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/15-Sacramento-CA.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - sacramento" width="1789" height="574" /></p>
<h3>#15: Sacramento, California</h3>
<p>Like Colorado Springs just above it in the ranking, No. 15, Sacramento, California, made our most neighborly list because of charity — 84 percent of all itemized tax returns from Sac included gifts — and carpooling — 9.2 percent of the city’s workers give each other lifts to work.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6448 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/16-Bridgeport-CT.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - bridgeport" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#16: Bridgeport, Connecticut</h3>
<p>Bridgeport, Connecticut, our No. 16 city, hits right at the national average for volunteerism and carpooling to work. So what sets this neighborly city apart? That would be the charity of its residents. 85.7 percent of itemized tax returns filed by Bridgeport residents include charitable gifts.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6449 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/17-Lakeland-FL.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - lakeland" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#17: Lakeland, Florida</h3>
<p>In Lakeland, Florida, our No. 17 city, people are clearly neighborly because of how many of them are willing to give time to helping others. Census data shows that a very impressive 36 percent of Lakeland residents have volunteered their time to help out an organization and make their community better.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6450 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/18-Baton-Rouge-LA.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - baton rouge" width="1789" height="573" /></h3>
<h3>#18: Baton Rouge, Louisiana</h3>
<p>What makes our No. 18 city, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, so neighborly? Plenty of people in the city give to charity and 9.1 percent of them carpool — more than the national average. But what really stands out is how many people report “informal” volunteering, or doing favors for the people around them — 6.5 percent of people report doing so, according to census data.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6451 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/19-Denver-CO.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - denver" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#19: Denver, Colorado</h3>
<p>Another Colorado city, Denver, makes our list at the No. 19 spot, for a few good reasons: An impressive 81.9 percent of itemized tax returns from Denver residents including donations to charity, and almost 30 percent of people who call Denver home report putting in volunteer hours. The Mile High City clearly also has mile-high rates of neighborliness.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6452 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/20-Grand-Rapids-MI.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - grand rapids" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#20: Grand Rapids, Michigan</h3>
<p>What sets our No. 20 most neighborly city, Grand Rapids, Michigan, apart from so many other places in the U.S. is how many people spend time formally volunteering — according to census data, nearly a third of people in Grand Rapids do. This city also ranked 23rd in a 2018 community wellbeing study, which means people in Grand Rapids are proud of their community and happy to live there. Happy people make great neighbors, if you ask us.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6453 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/21-Tucson-AZ.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - tucson" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#21: Tucson, Arizona</h3>
<p>In Tucson, Arizona, our No. 21 city, nearly 85 percent of people report charitable donations on their itemized tax returns. Tucson also has a higher-than-average rate of carpooling workers: 10 percent.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6454 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/22-Philadelphia-PA.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - philadelphia" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#22: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania</h3>
<p>They don’t call it the “City of Brotherly Love” for nothing. People in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania make great neighbors.</p>
<p>For starters, 84.3 percent of people there who file itemized tax returns report giving to charity. And 26.4 percent of Philly residents report putting in volunteer hours in their community.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6455 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/23-Charlotte-NC.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - charlotte" width="1789" height="574" /></p>
<h3>#23: Charlotte, North Carolina</h3>
<p>Charlotte, North Carolina nabs our No. 23 spot by being above average in just about every category of neighborliness: 85.9 percent of itemized tax deductions include gifts for charity, 30.2 percent of residents report that they volunteer on the regular, and 9.4 percent of workers carpool to their jobs. That’s a lot of people helping people, and you love to see it.</p>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6456 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/24-Honolulu-HI.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - honolulu" width="1789" height="574" /></p>
<h3>#24: Honolulu, Hawaii</h3>
<p>In Honolulu, Hawaii, our No. 24 most neighborly city, an incredible number of people help each other get to work — 14.6 percent of workers there carpool. In addition to that, Honolulu ranked 24th in the entire nation for its sense of community wellbeing, which, according to a 2018 study, measures how much people like where they live and take pride in their home communities.</p>
<h3><img class="alignnone wp-image-6457 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/25-Fort-Myers-FL.png" alt="Most Neighborly City - fort myers" width="1789" height="574" /></h3>
<h3>#25: Fort Myers, Florida</h3>
<p>Rounding out our list at No. 25 is Fort Myers, Florida, where helping out others definitely seems to be a priority for residents. 81 percent of itemized tax returns from Fort Myers residents included charitable gifts, and 10.3 percent of workers carpool together — more than the national average.</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<div id="infographic"></div>
<h2>Full Rankings</h2>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6458 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/26-Most-Neighborly-Cities-List.png" alt="Neighbor's Most Neighborly Cities in the US Ranking" width="1788" height="2710" /></p>
<h2>Methodology</h2>
<p>Here’s how we determined which cities are the most neighborly in America.</p>
<p>We started with a list of the 100 largest metro areas in the country, and from there, it was a combination of surveys, data points, and other factors.</p>
<p>We felt that informal volunteering (i.e. doing favors for neighbors) captured the spirit of being neighborly better than the other data points included, so that data was weighted more than the others. Here’s how everything was weighted:</p>
<ul>
<li>Informal volunteering: 3</li>
<li>Charitable giving: 1.5</li>
<li>Community well-being: 1.5</li>
<li>Formal volunteering: 1</li>
<li>Carpooling: 1</li>
</ul>
<h3>Which Cities Are Most Charitable?</h3>
<p>One of the biggest data points we looked at was charitable giving. <a href="https://www.magnifymoney.com/blog/personal-loans/most-charitable-places-study/" target="_blank"><u>Using IRS data compiled by Magnify Money</u></a>, we were able to calculate the percentage of itemized tax returns filed by residents in each community that included gifts to charity. Being charitable is a big part of being neighborly, so this data was a definite factor.</p>
<h3>Which Cities Are Most Selfless?</h3>
<p>Another big part of being a good neighbor is helping people out, so we turned to U.S. Census Bureau data from the <a href="https://data.nationalservice.gov/Volunteering-and-Civic-Engagement/Volunteering-and-Civic-Life-in-America/spx3-tt2b" target="_blank"><u>report on Volunteering and Civic Engagement</u></a>. We looked at two different data points from census surveys:</p>
<ul>
<li>The percentage of people in a place who did “formal” volunteering, or worked for organizations in their communities</li>
<li>The percentage of people in a place who reported “informal” volunteering, which can be as simple as doing favors for a friend or neighbor. It’s the very definition of being neighborly, so we had to include it.</li>
</ul>
<p>In addition to volunteering data, we looked at rates of workers in each city who help each other get to work. We factored in data about people who carpool collected as part of the <a href="https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs" target="_blank"><u>American Community Survey</u></a>, and included the percentage of Americans in each city who carpool to work as a ranking factor.</p>
<h3>Which Cities Are Thriving Communities?</h3>
<p>Another set of data that factored into our rankings was a <a href="https://wellbeingindex.sharecare.com/"><u>2018 study by </u></a><a href="https://wellbeingindex.sharecare.com/" target="_blank"><u>Gallup </u></a><a href="https://wellbeingindex.sharecare.com/"><u>and health engagement platform Sharecare</u></a>. That study created an index of “community wellbeing,” which was comprised of:</p>
<ul>
<li>How much people like where they live</li>
<li>Whether people feel safe where they live</li>
<li>How much people take pride in their home community</li>
</ul>
<p>That study created a ranking of the cities in the U.S. with the highest levels of community wellbeing, and several of our most neighborly cities ranked in the top 20 for community health.</p>
<h3>Were <em><i>All</i></em> U.S. Cities Considered?</h3>
<p>Using these data points means we were constrained by which cities the data was available for — we didn’t have all these data points for <em><i>every</i></em> city in the U.S. We compiled our data for the top 100 largest metro areas in the U.S., but for some of them, we still weren’t able to find all our data points. If just a data point or two was missing, we subbed in the national average. But it sadly wasn’t possible to analyze this data for <em><i>every</i></em> city and town in America. Some of the smaller ones that slipped under our radar may very well be the true most neighborly.<br />
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<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/most-neighborly-cities-america/">Ranking: The 25 Most Neighborly Cities in America</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
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		<title>Self Storage Is Meeting Demand By Getting Younger, Cooler, and More Creative</title>
		<link>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/self-storage-more-creative/</link>
		<comments>https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/self-storage-more-creative/#respond</comments>
		<pubDate>Tue, 15 Sep 2020 16:00:19 +0000</pubDate>
		<dc:creator><![CDATA[Neighbor]]></dc:creator>
				<category><![CDATA[Neighbor News]]></category>
		<category><![CDATA[Self Storage]]></category>

		<guid isPermaLink="false">https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/?p=6412</guid>
		<description><![CDATA[<p>People need self-storage in cities where there’s no room for traditional, sprawling storage facilities. Here’s how the industry is getting creative to meet storage demand in dense, urban neighborhoods.</p>
<p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog/self-storage-more-creative/">Self Storage Is Meeting Demand By Getting Younger, Cooler, and More Creative</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.neighbor.com/storage-blog">Neighbor Blog</a>.</p>
]]></description>
				<content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>When you picture a self-storage facility, you likely envision the traditional kind of facility we’re all familiar with: long hallways lined with storage units in a sprawling complex that requires some serious real estate.</p>
<p>You probably don’t picture a <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/neighbor-com-launches-across-san-francisco-bay-area-disrupting-local-self-storage-market/"><u>brightly-lit, 10,000-square-foot warehouse space in San Francisco’s downtown market district</u></a>, surrounded by high-rise buildings and with a coworking space operating above it. But in 2020, self-storage is beginning to look different from what we’re used to.</p>
<p><span id="more-6412"></span></p>
<p>This year, Neighbor made its first commercial expansion into San Francisco, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/rentals/San-Francisco--California-self-storage-space-22433?startDate=2020-08-27"><u>listing that 10,000-square-foot storage space</u></a>, located at 995 Market Street in Mid Market, on our peer-to-peer storage rental platform. The space is located on the first floor of a building operated by WeWork, making it the kind of mixed-use storage facility that’s becoming increasingly common in dense metro areas. And in the coming months, Neighbor plans to add more of these types of repurposed, rentable spaces to its platform.</p>
<p>San Francisco is one of the most densely populated areas in the United States. <a href="https://www.census.gov/population/www/censusdata/density.html" target="_blank"><u>According to the Census Bureau</u></a>, San Francisco is home to 17,246.4 people per square mile.</p>
<p>Having that many people means there’s a real need in the San Francisco area for self-storage — but the density of the population begs the question: Where do you put it?</p>
<p>But this year, <a href="https://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/news/2020/08/13/san-francisco-vacancy-rates-sublease-rents-low.html" target="_blank"><u>San Francisco’s office vacancy rates nearly doubled</u></a>, from 3.7 percent at the end of 2019, to 6.6 percent in the second quarter of 2020. San Francisco isn’t alone in that either — with the coronavirus pandemic causing many companies to shift to long-term remote work, office vacancies in cities all over the U.S. are <a href="https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200817005422/en/Moody%E2%80%99s-Analytics-Forecasts-Office-Vacancy-Rate-Hitting" target="_blank"><u>expected to reach historic highs</u></a>. Considering this trend, it’s no surprise that storage facilities like the one at 995 Market Street are becoming more common. Residents need storage. And commercial landlords and building owners need to fill newly vacant space.</p>
<p>And so, in 2020, <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/neighbor-self-storage-costs/"><u>self-storage is changing</u></a>. Far from the sprawling, side-of-the-highway facilities most of us are familiar with, a new kind of self-storage is becoming more common: urban, mixed-use space that meets the needs of a new generation. And emerging technology, like Neighbor’s platform, is facilitating that shift.</p>
<p>Here’s how and why self-storage is changing, and how Neighbor is meeting the needs of a new kind of self-storage customer.</p>
<h2>Self Storage Demand Goes Where the People Are</h2>
<p>To understand and predict new trends in consumers’ need for self-storage, you have to understand some of the industry’s history.</p>
<p>For example, the fact that <a href="https://www.neighbor.com/storage-blog/the-storage-facility-managers-guide-to-occupancy-rates/"><u>self-storage occupancy</u></a> has been holding steady at over 90 percent since 2015 tells us that there’s a consistent need for storage space that’s keeping up with the industry’s growth.</p>
<p>Speaking of the industry’s growth, it currently <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/914662/self-storage-completions-usa/" target="_blank"><u>totals about 60 million square feet of new construction each year</u></a>. Self-storage is a $40-billion-per-year industry that represents the fastest-growing segment in commercial real estate — and has for four decades running. While many industries have contracted during the pandemic, self-storage has seen continued growth from people who want more personal living space in their homes, or who are relocating for new jobs or downsizing to reduce their living expenses.</p>
<p><a href="https://www.selfstorage.org/Blog/ArticleID/72/The-Impact-of-Population-Growth-on-Self-Storage-Development" target="_blank"><u>According to the Self Storage Association</u></a>, one of the most important factors to consider when predicting self-storage demand in any given area is its population growth. For example, take Raleigh, North Carolina, the metro area that experienced the third-highest population growth in the U.S. from 2010 to 2016. Raleigh also ranks extremely high among cities with the most new self-storage space coming online year-over-year.</p>
<p>On the other hand, consider Chicago, which has shown the largest population decline of any major metropolitan area in the U.S. in recent years. Subsequently, the Chicago area’s self-storage demand is softening, and the industry there is showing lower square footage growth and square foot per capita growth than the national average.</p>
<p>In other words, self-storage demand is highest in places where population numbers are not only high, but trending upwards. That means that self-storage is needed in metropolitan areas where the population is growing. <a href="https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-releases/2020/pop-estimates-county-metro.html" target="_blank"><u>According to the Census Bureau</u></a>, the top five fastest-growing metro areas in the U.S. from 2010 to 2019 are:</p>
<ul>
<li>Dallas, Texas</li>
<li>Houston, Texas</li>
<li>Phoenix, Arizona</li>
<li>Atlanta, Georgia</li>
<li>Washington, D.C.</li>
</ul>
<p><img class="alignnone wp-image-6414 size-full" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/01-Fastest-Growing-Cities-Densely-Populated-Infographic.png" alt="fastest growing cities are some of the most densely populated ones" width="1788" height="3230" /></p>
<p>All of those cities also appear in the Census Bureau’s top 10 list of most populous metropolitan areas. That means the cities with the highest rates of growth (and presumably the largest demand for more self-storage) are already some of the nation’s biggest and most densely populated.</p>
<h2>How Do You Build Sprawling Storage Facilities in Dense Cities?</h2>
<p>The short answer? You don’t. You get creative instead.</p>
<p><em><i><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-6421" src="https://blog.neighbor.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/02-Trunk-Club-Composite_1.png" alt="How Do You Build Sprawling Storage Facilities in Dense Cities" width="1200" height="869" /> </i></em></p>
<p>Take Chicago’s 325 W. Ohio Street, for example. Located in the trendy and upscale River North neighborhood, where real estate is at a premium, the Life Storage facility located here has managed to find a way to offer self-storage that’s needed in the densely populated neighborhood, while subsidizing the cost of square footage on one of Chicago’s most in-demand blocks: The upper floors of the building are home to a Trunk Club Clubhouse, rented by Nordstrom and used as a combination lounge, patio, and retail space. Here, customers can rent a storage unit, go upstairs for a drink, hang out on the trendy rooftop patio, and meet